2

I need a function that will take two iterators and a custom comparator to compare values of this iterators. I don't want use additional template argument for this. I've implemented it in this way:

template<typename T>
void foo(T begin, T end,
  function<bool(decltype(*begin), decltype(*begin))> compare = less<decltype(*begin)>())
{
    // I want to use 'compare' as: "compare(*begin, *begin);"
}

This code has been compiled normally by clang, but on GCC 5.4.0 I've got some errors:

binary_heap.cpp:10:79: error: local variable 'begin' may not appear in this context
   function<bool(decltype(*begin), decltype(*begin))> compare = less<decltype(*begin)>())
                                                                               ^
binary_heap.cpp:10:85: error: template argument 1 is invalid
   function<bool(decltype(*begin), decltype(*begin))> compare = less<decltype(*begin)>())

How to correct this code so that it can be successfully compiled on both clang and GCC? Or maybe are there a more suitable solution for defining such function?

  • Why do you not want to use an additional template argument for this? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Oct 20 '16 at 18:47
5

You cannot use a parameter in a default argument, even in an unevaluated context (although the Standard should probably be amended to loosen that restriction). Instead of decltype(*begin), use

decltype(*std::declval<T&>())

Edit: Actually, that probably doesn't do what you want, since if applying the * operator yields an lvalue, then the decltype specifier will resolve to an lvalue reference, but you would want the unreferenced type to be the argument to std::less. Better to use:

typename std::iterator_traits<T>::value_type

Edit 2: I agree with krzaq, it's better to just add another template parameter.

4

You're pessimizing performance of your algorithm by a lot just by forcing the use of function (more details here). Just take template deduced Compare and you're golden:

template<typename T, typename Compare = std::less<typename iterator_traits<T>::value_type>>
void foo(T begin, T end, Compare compare = {})
{
    // I want to use 'compare' as: "compare(*begin, *begin);"
}

Interestingly, standard algorithms force/suggest use of lightweight functors by taking them by value instead of a forwarding reference.


To answer the actual question: you can use std::less<>, which defaults to std::less<void> and has templated operator() doing the actual comparisons:

template<typename T>
void foo(T begin, T end,
  function<bool(decltype(*begin), decltype(*begin))> compare = less<>())
{
    // I want to use 'compare' as: "compare(*begin, *begin);"
}
  • Out of curiosity, in what ways do you pessimize the performance by using function? – RyanP Oct 20 '16 at 18:51
  • @krzaq Thank you! If I interested in best performance, what kind of solution should I choose? – 0x1337 Oct 20 '16 at 18:54
  • @0x1337 I'd pass a template parameter without much interference. It makes for slightly worse error messages (hopefully to be fixed with concepts), but is readable, fast and consistent with the standard library. Look how Compare is taken by std::sort – krzaq Oct 20 '16 at 18:57
  • 1
    I'd use {} instead of Compare{} following DRY. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Oct 20 '16 at 19:40
3

Add another template parameter Compare. This makes inlining easier by the compiler. While I'm at it support Sentinels.

template<class It, class Sentinel, class Compare=std::less<void>>
void foo(It begin, Sentinel end, Compare cmp={}) {
}

However, assuming C++14, barring the above, I'd do this:

template<class T>
using comparator_sig = bool(T const&,T const&);
template<class T>
using comparator = std::function<comparator_sig<T>>;
template<class It>
using compare_inside_it = comparator<
  typename std::iterator_traits<It>::value_type
>;

template<typename T>
void foo(T begin, T end, compare_inside_it<T> compare = less<>) {
}

in C++11 I would write my own less<void>:

struct compare_less {
  template<class T>
  bool operator()( T const& lhs, T const& rhs ) const {
    return std::less<T>{}(lhs, rhs);
  }
};

and do:

template<typename T>
void foo(T begin, T end, compare_inside_it<T> compare = compare_less{}) {
}

or even just do:

template<typename T>
void foo(T begin, T end, compare_inside_it<T> compare = {}) {
  if (!compare) compare=compare_less{};
}

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