value = input("Enter the binary value to convert to a decimal number.")
prod = 0
power = 0
ans = 0
for i in range (int(value)):
    prod = ((int(value[*right most digit here*])) * ((2**power)))
    ans = prod + ans
    prod = 0
    power + 1
else:
    print (ans)

I am trying to create a binary calculator.

I believe I have the power part of the equation working as it begins with 2 ^ 0, then 2 ^ 1 for the next digit and so on. But I am having trouble getting the first part of the equation, the right most digit of the value inputted.

So let's say, 0101 was inputted. I want 1 * ( 2 ^ 0 ) in the first loop, 0 * ( 2 ^ 1) in the second loop, and so on; right to left. So with how indexing works in Python, how can I reverse index it so [4] is in the first loop, then [3] in the second loop, and so on.

Thanks for help.

  • Just for the record, you can always use int(value,base=2). However, if you just want to use this as an exercise, the proper way would be to iterate over the string (not the indices) in reversed order: for bit in reversed(value): – juanpa.arrivillaga Oct 20 '16 at 20:08
  • Also, no need for prod = 0 in your loop. And power + 1 should be power = power + 1 or power +=1. Or better yet, do for power, bit in enumerate(reversed(value)): and no need to deal with incrementing. – juanpa.arrivillaga Oct 20 '16 at 20:16
  • I appreciate the help. But I'm quite new to this and I'm having trouble finding exactly where to put the code you have suggested. prod = 0 is removed, and now power = power + 1. Although I can't find where to put for power, bit in enumerate(reversed(value)): Is this to replace the for loop? – AAGW Oct 20 '16 at 20:23
  • Yes. In python, unless you need the index don't loop over something like for i in range(len(something)):, rather, just use for thing in something: – juanpa.arrivillaga Oct 20 '16 at 20:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

However there are better options available, i am assuming you are clearing your basics. Following can be the options:

Note : You should use len(value) instead of int(value) in the loop.

#  1. When starting the loop from 0 (i.e. i=0). you can use ( len(value) - i )th index.'

for i in range (len(value)):
   prod = ((int(value[len(value) - i - 1])) * ((2**power)))
   ans = prod + ans
   prod = 0
   power = power + 1



# 2. Python also supports negative indexing, So you may run a loop from -1 to -len(value).

for i in range (-1,-len(value) - 1,-1):
   prod = ((int(value[i])) * ((2**power)))
   ans = prod + ans
   prod = 0
   power = power + 1


# 3. You can reverse the whole string in your first step and then loop from 0 to len(value)-1.

value = reversed(value)
for i in range (len(value)):
   prod = ((int(value[i])) * ((2**power)))
   ans = prod + ans
   prod = 0
   power = power + 1

But there are some bugs in the code (or may be lack on information). This code works only for unsigned integers. If you want it to work on signed numbers as well, you have to take 2's complement into consideration. Below is a very simple code that works with signed numbers too (in case needed):

#convert binary string into decimal value. Works on 2's complement.
def binToDecimal(s):

    neg = False
    if s[0] == '1':
        s = twosComp(s)
        neg = True
    #compute the decimal value
    val = reduce(lambda x,y : int(x)*2+1 if y=='1' else int(x)*2,'0'+s)
    #negate the value if the first bit is 1
    return -val if neg else val


#return the 2's complement string
def twosComp(s):
    s = list(s[::-1])
    #take 1's complement
    s = ['1' if i=='0' else '0' for i in s]
    #take 2's complement
    for i in range(len(s)):
        if s[i] == '0':
            #no carry will be generated in this case, so we break it.
            s[i] = '1'
            break
        else:
            s[i]='0'

    # return 2's complement string
    return ''.join(map(str,s))[::-1]
  • Hi there. Thanks so much for your help. I am using your second example and I am looking at the loop code for i in range (-1,-len(value) - 1,-1):. I just want to make sure that I understand what this is actually doing. Am I right in saying that it starts at index value -1 (right most) and then for every loop, -1 is added on? To then make -2 and so on? – AAGW Oct 20 '16 at 21:43
  • @AAGW, Exactly. You got it right !!! – Shasha99 Oct 20 '16 at 21:45
value = input("Enter the binary value to convert to a decimal number.")
power = 0
ans = 0

for i in reversed(value):
    prod = int(i) * (2**power)
    ans = prod + ans
    power += 1
else:
    print(ans)

Improved your code while keeping it as close to your code as possible. Your for loop was creating a list of 1 to whatever the value we input, that's not what you should be doing. One way of doing is, treating your input as a string (which basically is a list that can be iterated through) reverse it so you go from right to left, then do your operation on it on each value. You were trying to get the index of the location of the value input right? Why? Python is beautiful where you most likely don't need to directly tell the index of something.

value = input("Enter the binary value to convert to a decimal number.")
prod = 0
power = 0
ans = 0
for i in range(int(len(value))-1):
    prod = ((int(value[-1])) * ((2**power)))
    ans = prod + ans
    prod = 0
    power + 1
else:
    print (ans)

You were doing the range of the value and not the input len so we use len() to get the length of the string that was inputted. -1 is there because the length of a string can be 3 for input 001 but if indexing 3 would be out of bounds because indexing starts at 0 not 1

Note that in Python a negative index value is accepted. Negative index means starts from the end of the list and count backwards, so I think that was the answer you were looking for.

For example if we have the list my_list=['a','b','c'] and we call my_list[-2] it will return 'b'

You have some mistakes in your code, so replace it with this:

value = input("Enter the binary value to convert to a decimal number: ")
value = int(value) # conversion from string to number

power = 0
ans   = 0

while(value > 0):
    lastDigit = value %  10  # last digit
    value     = value // 10  # cutting off last digit (for next iteration)

    prod      = lastDigit * (2 ** power)

    ans       = prod  + ans
    power     = power + 1

print (ans)

Last digit is calculated as the remainder after division by 10 (value % 10) and is cutting of by integer division by 10 (value // 10) - as in first grades of basic school: 27 % 10 = 7 27 // 10 = 2

  • I would not recommend a while loop in this case. It is not good Python style, and less efficient. There are some cases where a while loop is necessary, but they tend to be rare in python. – juanpa.arrivillaga Oct 20 '16 at 20:27
  • Please consider to accept and upvote the answer(s) which was useful for you. – MarianD May 28 '17 at 17:57

Simpler way to achieve this with be to mention base as 2 with int(). For example:

>>> num = '110'
>>> int(num, 2)
6

In case you are looking for custom solution, you may create a function as:

def binary_string_to_int(binary_string):
    int_num = 0
    for i in binary_string:
        int_num += int(i)
        int_num *= 2
    return int_num / 2

Sample run:

>>> binary_string_to_int('111')
7
>>> binary_string_to_int('101')
5
  • I've done something similar to this but now it appears the calculations are backwards. For example, 100 = 1, instead of 4. – AAGW Oct 20 '16 at 20:31
  • @AAGW: Earlier there was some issue with the logic of my code. Updated the function code. Check now – Moinuddin Quadri Oct 20 '16 at 20:33

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