1

This question already has an answer here:

I'm fairly new to C# and I tried my best to find an already answered question similar to mine but I just could not get the answers to relate to my question.

So, I have an "Instance"-class which is supposed to be a super class for all game objects. It has a read-only ClassName property defined as such:

    public string ClassName
    {
        get
        {
            return this.GetType().Name;
        }
    }

And my reason for this question is that I want to have the following method which would return true if the current object is an instance of className, or if the object's class inherits from className.

    public bool IsA(string className)
    {
        //TODO
    }

This needs to be sort-of "recursive" so that if the case was: X : Class1 : Class2: Class4 then X.IsA(Class4) would return true

I've looked into methods like object.GetType() but I haven't figured out a solution.

Any ideas?

marked as duplicate by sstan, Theraot, Enigmativity c# Oct 21 '16 at 2:25

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • This needs to be sort-of "recursive" so that if the case was: X : Class1 : Class2: Class4 then X.IsA(Class4) would return true – Elmub Oct 21 '16 at 2:17
  • Taken from the accepted answer in the duplicate thread: is returns true if an instance is in the inheritance tree. Relevant documentation: is (C# Reference). – sstan Oct 21 '16 at 2:19
  • Yes I just read that aswell but one problem still persists, my parameter is a string not a class – Elmub Oct 21 '16 at 2:21
  • 2
    You're entering dangerous waters if you are using a string here. Are you sure that you are stuck using a string? If you show us where the string comes from, we may be able to suggest a cleaner alternative. – sstan Oct 21 '16 at 2:24
  • gist.github.com/Elmuti/e09b066207eef0b551f0df6f56ce48f4 I wrote this based on that linked duplicate but I'm not sure if this will work – Elmub Oct 21 '16 at 2:27
1

Just use the is or as statement. as will try to cast it to the target, and will be null if it fails (from memory).

Here's a quick linqpad demo (replace "yep".Dump()" with Console.Out.Write("yep"); for VS):

void Main()
{
    var  b = new bar();

    if (b is foo)
        "yep".Dump();
    else
        "nope".Dump();

    var b2 = new bar();
    var b3 = b2 as foo;
    // you can check if b3 is null, or if not, use it a foo.

}


class foo {}

class bar : foo {}
  • You say to use as but then don't show it in use. – mason Oct 21 '16 at 2:02
  • Does "b is foo" also check, for example if b is inherited from the class that foo inherits from? – Elmub Oct 21 '16 at 2:09
  • 2
    @user3524922 what prevents you from checking the documentation for it first? – zerkms Oct 21 '16 at 2:18
  • 1
    Well the problem is, the parameter is a string not a class – Elmub Oct 21 '16 at 2:20
  • @user3524922 what do you mean the parameter is a string ? – Noctis Oct 21 '16 at 8:17

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