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i am making a game that will sort out the risk dice rolling but i can only get it to compare the last two numbers and tell me who has won but i want it to order the numbers then compare the top numbers from each set ( like in a normal risk game) here is my code

import random
import time
from random import randrange
from random import randint
r = randint
min = 1
max = 6


def main():
    print("Welcome to risk dice")
    playing = input("Press Enter to Roll or Q to quit")

    if playing == 'q':
        print("Thanks for Playing")
        time.sleep(2)
        quit()
    elif playing != 'q':
        rolls = int(float(input('how many soliders are you attacking with:')))
        for x in range(rolls):
            print ('you got a...')
            a = (r(min, max))
            print(a)
        rolls = int(float(input('how many soliders are you defending with:')))
        for x in range(rolls):
            print ('you got a...')
            d = (r(min, max))
            print(d)
        if d >= a:
            print('defence wins')
        else:
            print('attackers win')
        main()
main()

any ideas are welcome im completely stuck (im using python 3.4.4)

  • You need somewhere to store the previous rolls. Right now you're using a & d for every die for the attacker and defender respectively, so it gets overwritten when you roll a new die. – TemporalWolf Oct 21 '16 at 17:11
  • ok thx ill have a look at that but i still need a way to order and compare all the numbers if anyone can help – Alex Oct 21 '16 at 17:13
  • If you store your numbers as an array (example a is [1, 5, 2, 4]) you can call a.sort(reverse=True) which will sort it from highest to lowest (default is lowest to highest). Give it the ol' college try and update your question with your attempt. – TemporalWolf Oct 21 '16 at 17:18
  • thank that works really well but i can't work out how to add it to my script so you can say how many dice you rolling for each variable also i could probably work out how to do this by my self but if you know can you tell me how to compare the second numbers on the lists – Alex Oct 21 '16 at 17:42
  • Edit your question to include what you've tried and what your expected result is. – TemporalWolf Oct 21 '16 at 17:55
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attacker_dice = []
defender_dice = []

Initialize empty arrays to put the dice in as we roll them.

rolls = int(float(input('how many soliders are you attacking with:')))
        for x in range(rolls):
            print ('you got a...')
            attacker_dice.append(r(min, max))
            print(attacker_dice[-1])

Here we append the new values to the arrays, which adds them to the end. Then, we print the number at index [-1] which is the last item.

attacker_dice.sort(reverse=True)
defender_dice.sort(reverse=True)

Once we have the arrays, we sort (from high to low)

paired_dice = zip(attacker_dice, defender_dice)

Then, we pair the dice with zip. Zip by default drops any dice that can't be paired. This mirrors the Risk rules, that you drop the lowest unpaired dice.

attacker_wins = 0
defender_wins = 0
for pair in paired_dice:
    attacker, defender = pair

Here we unpack the dice: for pair in paired_dice loops between each pair. attacker, defender = pair unpacks the pairs into their component dice.

    if attacker > defender:
        attacker_wins += 1
    else:
        defender_wins += 1

It's important to note for Risk, attacker_wins is how many armies the defender loses and vice versa.


This example works on repl.it. Since the input in not constrained, I tested it to 50 on 50 and it works just fine.

| improve this answer | |
  • @Alex I've updated it with a working examples on repl.it – TemporalWolf Oct 21 '16 at 20:17
  • ok wow that works amazingly thanks i didn't copy it down corectly – Alex Oct 21 '16 at 20:35
  • mine works to but i like you idea of saying how many armies you lose rather than if you just win or lose the battal – Alex Oct 21 '16 at 20:37
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i have edited galra's scripted to get exactly what i want (galra's scripted didn't work but i used some of the ideas)

import random
import time
from random import randrange
from random import randint
r = randint
min = 1
max = 6

def main():
    print("Welcome to risk dice")
    playing = input("Press Enter to Roll or Q to quit")

    if playing == 'q':
        print("Thanks for Playing")
        time.sleep(2)
        quit()
    elif playing != 'q':
        rolls = int(float(input('how many soliders are you attacking with:')))
        a = [ r(min, max) for x in range(rolls) ]
        a.sort(reverse=True)
        print('you got a...')
        print(a)
        rolls = int(float(input('how many soliders are you defending with:')))
        d = [ r(min, max) for x in range(rolls) ]
        d.sort(reverse=True)
        print('you got a...')
        print(d)

        if a <= d:
            print('defence wins the first battal')
        elif a > d:
            print('attackers win the first battal')

        a2 = a[1]
        d2 = d[1]
        if a2 <= d2:
            print('defence wins the second battal')
        elif a2 > d2:
            print('attackers win the second battal')
        main()
main()

thanks mostly to TemporalWolf for your advice i haven't checked to see if your answer works but this one works for me

| improve this answer | |
-1

I'm not familiar with the game, but I believe that's what you're asking for. What's different? Now the code rolls all the attacker turns one after the other, saves them to a list and printing the results, following by the same procedure for the defender. After both player's rolls have been evaluated, the short one is padded to fit the length of the long one (assigning a value of 0 to every missing roll). The two are sorted and compared. As I mentioned, I don't know the game, but this should give you a start for comparing all the rolls one to another.

import random
import time
from random import randrange
from random import randint
r = randint
min = 1
max = 6

def main():
    print("Welcome to risk dice")
    playing = input("Press Enter to Roll or Q to quit")

    if playing == 'q':
        print("Thanks for Playing")
        time.sleep(2)
        quit()
    elif playing != 'q':
        rolls = int(float(input('how many soliders are you attacking with:')))
        # evaluating all the attacker rolls
        rolls_attack_res = [ r(min, max) for i in range(rolls) ]
        print('you got a...')
        print('\n'.join(rolls_attack_res))
        rolls = int(float(input('how many soliders are you defending with:')))
        # evaluating all the defender rolls
        rolls_defense_res = [ r(min, max) for i in range(rolls) ]
        print('you got a...')
        print('\n'.join(rolls_defense_res))

        # filling the missing rolls for the player with less soldiers
        max_len = max(len(rolls_attack_res), len(rolls_defense_res))
        rolls_attack_res.extend([0] * (max_len - len(rolls_attack_res)))
        rolls_defense_res.extend([0] * (max_len - len(rolls_defense_res)))
        # sorting the rolls of both players
        rolls_attack_res.sort()
        rolls_defense_res.sort()
        # comparing the rolls, highest to highest, and following.
        rolls_res = zip(rolls_attack_res, rolls_defense_res)
        num_of_attack_wins = len([ 1 for a,d in rolls_res if a > d ])
        num_of_defense_wins = len(rolls_res) - num_of_attack_wins
        if num_of_defense_wins >= num_of_attack_wins:
            print('defence wins')
        else:
            print('attackers win')
        main()
main()
| improve this answer | |
  • Can you add some explanation as to what you're doing any why this is better? A code dump is unlikely to help future users who are trying to address a similar issue. – TemporalWolf Oct 21 '16 at 17:50
  • yeah i know i keep forgetting to add comments on my code sorry – Alex Oct 21 '16 at 17:53
  • @Alex that was actually directed at galra, but it's good advice in general :) – TemporalWolf Oct 21 '16 at 17:54
  • also galra thanks for the code and i agree it would probably help to add comment but i don't mind because i always forget to add them to – Alex Oct 21 '16 at 17:56
  • @galra this code doesn't follow the rules of Risk. Uneven die rolls drop the extra, lowest, dice. They aren't counted as automatic wins. Also, you want sort(reverse=True) to do high to low. – TemporalWolf Oct 21 '16 at 17:56

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