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I am watching this video. Basically it says that using a dictionary(python's language?) will make calculate fibonacci from time O(n^2) to O(n).

I have the programmed the following code, fibo1 ought to be O(n) but actually it runs really slow. fibo2 is the normal recursion and it is O(n^2) solution, but actually it runs much faster than fibo1. How can I understand this?

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
int fibo1(int i, std::map<int,int>& m);
int fibo2(int i);

int main()
{
    std::map<int,int> m;
    m[1] = 1; m[2] = 1;
    int n = 40;
    std::cout << fibo1(n,m);
    //std::cout << fibo2(n);
    return 0;
}

int fibo1(int i, std::map<int,int>& m)   {
    if(m[i]==0)   {
        return fibo1(i-1,m)+fibo1(i-2,m);
    }
    return m[i];
}

int fibo2(int i) {
    if(i==1 || i==2) {
        return 1;
    }

    return fibo2(i-1)+fibo2(i-2);
}
  • Why no comment vote down? – an offer can't refuse Oct 21 '16 at 17:31
  • 3
    Most probably that dictionary you talk about provides O(1) insert/lookup behavior. std::map has O(log(n)) insert/lookup as far as I know. You can use unordered_map for O(1) behavior though. And also, you need to assign m[i] before returning inside the if statement. – zahir Oct 21 '16 at 17:35
  • @buzhidao Profile your code to find the bottlenecks. "Why no comment vote down?" It probably means you should improve your question. Generally there's no comment needed with every downvote. – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 21 '16 at 17:36
  • @zahir unordered_map is then just like dictionary structure in python--a hash table? – an offer can't refuse Oct 21 '16 at 17:54
  • So, bug aside, the purpose of m is to cache values that have already been calculated? And those values will be for arguments from 1 up to n. That sounds very much like an array or a vector. A map has far more overhead for no benefit here. – Pete Becker Oct 21 '16 at 19:14
5

You never actually write the fib[n] at m[n], so you never look up anything and always recalculate it. Use m[i] = fibo1(i-1,m) + fibo1(i-2,m); in the if statement rather than the return line.

| improve this answer | |
  • Haha nice catch. I hate these kind of bugs. It's like your mind fills in the code you've written with the code that's in your head and you miss it. You've got to actually execute the code in your head line by line instead of 'reading' it. – joseph Oct 21 '16 at 17:42
3

In the fibo1 method you are only returning the values without setting the map a proper value.

int fibo1(int i, std::map<int,int>& m)   {
if(m[i]==0)   {
    m[i] = fibo1(i-1,m)+fibo1(i-2,m);
}
return m[i];
}

Also, you should consider using a simple vector instead of a map to get a better performance

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1

You do not store result in the map, and you should remember, that std::map::operator[] is doing lookup which is significantly expensive, so you should avoid multiple lookups for the same key:

int fibo1(int i, std::map<int,int>& m)   {
    int &value = m[i];
    if( value == 0)   {
        value = fibo1(i-1,m)+fibo1(i-2,m);
    }
    return value;
}
| improve this answer | |

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