16

Kotlin beginner here. How do I take a list and without mutating it, create a second (immutable) list with one updated element at a specific index?

I'm thinking of two ways, both of which seem like they may incur performance hits, mutate the underlying object, or both.

data class Player(val name: String, val score: Int = 0)

val players: List<Player> = ...

// Do I do this?
val updatedPlayers1 = players.mapIndexed { i, player ->
    if (i == 2) player.copy(score = 100)
    else player
}

// Or this?
val updatedPlayer = players[2].copy(score = 100)
val mutable = players.toMutableList()
mutable.set(2, updatedPlayer)
val updatedPlayers2 = mutable.toList()

If there is no performant way to do this, is there a more appropriate data structure in the Kotlin stdlib or other library? Kotlin doesn't seem to have vectors.

  • Have you found answer? – Ruslan Nov 13 '16 at 21:36
11

For me obvious that second way should be faster, but how much?

So I wrote some benchmarks here

@State(Scope.Thread)
open class ModifyingImmutableList {

    @Param("10", "100", "10000", "1000000")
    var size: Int = 0

    lateinit var players: List<Player>

    @Setup
    fun setup() {
        players = generatePlayers(size)
    }

    @Benchmark fun iterative(): List<Player> {
        return players.mapIndexed { i, player ->
            if (i == 2) player.copy(score = 100)
            else player
        }
    }

    @Benchmark fun toMutable(): List<Player> {
        val updatedPlayer = players[2].copy(score = 100)
        val mutable = players.toMutableList()
        mutable.set(2, updatedPlayer)
        return mutable.toList()
    }

    @Benchmark fun toArrayList(): List<Player> {
        val updatedPlayer = players[2].copy(score = 100)
        return players.set(2, updatedPlayer)
    }
}

And got following results:

$ java -jar target/benchmarks.jar -f 5 -wi 5 ModifyingImmutableList
Benchmark                            (size)   Mode  Cnt         Score        Error  Units
ModifyingImmutableList.iterative         10  thrpt  100   6885018.769 ± 189148.764  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.iterative        100  thrpt  100    877403.066 ±  20792.117  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.iterative      10000  thrpt  100     10456.272 ±    382.177  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.iterative    1000000  thrpt  100       108.167 ±      3.506  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList       10  thrpt  100  33278431.127 ± 560577.516  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList      100  thrpt  100  11009646.095 ± 180549.177  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList    10000  thrpt  100    129167.033 ±   2532.945  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList  1000000  thrpt  100       528.502 ±     16.451  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toMutable         10  thrpt  100  19679357.039 ± 338925.701  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toMutable        100  thrpt  100   5504388.388 ± 102757.671  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toMutable      10000  thrpt  100     62809.131 ±   1070.111  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toMutable    1000000  thrpt  100       258.013 ±      8.076  ops/s

So this tests shows that iterating over collection about 3~6 times slower, that copying. Also I provide my implementation: toArray, which looks like more performant.

On 10 element, toArray method has throughput 33278431.127 ± 560577.516 operations per second. Is it slow? Or it's extremely fast? I write "baseline" test, which shows cost of copying Players and mutating array. Results interesting:

@Benchmark fun baseline(): List<Player> {
    val updatedPlayer = players[2].copy(score = 100)
    mutable[2] = updatedPlayer;
    return mutable
}

Where mutable - just MutableList, which is ArrayList.

$ java -jar target/benchmarks.jar -f 5 -wi 5 ModifyingImmutableList
Benchmark                            (size)   Mode  Cnt         Score         Error  Units
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline          10  thrpt  100  81026110.043 ± 1076989.958  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline         100  thrpt  100  81299168.496 ±  910200.124  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline       10000  thrpt  100  81854190.779 ± 1010264.620  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline     1000000  thrpt  100  83906022.547 ±  615205.008  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList       10  thrpt  100  33090236.757 ±  518459.863  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList      100  thrpt  100  11074338.763 ±  138272.711  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList    10000  thrpt  100    131486.634 ±    1188.045  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList  1000000  thrpt  100       531.425 ±      18.513  ops/s

On 10 elements we have 2x regression, and on 1 million about 150000x!

So looks like ArrayList not the best choice for immutable data structures. But there are a lot other collections, one of them is pcollections. Let's see what they got in our scenario:

@Benchmark fun pcollections(): List<Player> {
    val updatedPlayer = players[2].copy(score = 100)
    return pvector.with(2, updatedPlayer)
}

Where pvector is pvector:PVector<Player> = TreePVector.from(players).

$ java -jar target/benchmarks.jar -f 5 -wi 5 ModifyingImmutableList
Benchmark                             (size)   Mode  Cnt         Score         Error  Units
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline           10  thrpt  100  79462416.691 ± 1391446.159  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline          100  thrpt  100  79991447.499 ± 1328008.619  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline        10000  thrpt  100  80017095.482 ± 1385143.058  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline      1000000  thrpt  100  81358696.411 ± 1308714.098  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.pcollections       10  thrpt  100  15665979.142 ±  371910.991  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.pcollections      100  thrpt  100   9419433.113 ±  161562.675  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.pcollections    10000  thrpt  100   4747628.815 ±   81192.752  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.pcollections  1000000  thrpt  100   3011819.457 ±   45548.403  ops/s

Nice results! On 1 million case we have only 27x slower execution, which is pretty cool, but on small collections pcollections little bit slower that ArrayList implementation.

Update: as @mfulton26 mentioned, in toMutable benchmark toList is unnecessary, so I deleted it and reran tests. Also I added benchmark on cost of creation TreePVector from existing array:

$ java -jar target/benchmarks.jar  ModifyingImmutableList
Benchmark                                 (size)   Mode  Cnt         Score         Error  Units
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline               10  thrpt  200  77639718.988 ± 1384171.128  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline              100  thrpt  200  75978576.147 ± 1528533.332  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline            10000  thrpt  200  79041238.378 ± 1137107.301  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.baseline          1000000  thrpt  200  84739641.265 ±  557334.317  ops/s

ModifyingImmutableList.iterative              10  thrpt  200   7389762.016 ±   72981.918  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.iterative             100  thrpt  200    956362.269 ±   11642.808  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.iterative           10000  thrpt  200     10953.451 ±     121.175  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.iterative         1000000  thrpt  200       115.379 ±       1.301  ops/s

ModifyingImmutableList.pcollections           10  thrpt  200  15984856.119 ±  162075.427  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.pcollections          100  thrpt  200   9322011.769 ±  176301.745  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.pcollections        10000  thrpt  200   4854742.140 ±   69066.751  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.pcollections      1000000  thrpt  200   3064251.812 ±   35972.244  ops/s

ModifyingImmutableList.pcollectionsFrom       10  thrpt  200   1585762.689 ±   20972.881  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.pcollectionsFrom      100  thrpt  200     67107.504 ±     808.308  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.pcollectionsFrom    10000  thrpt  200       268.268 ±       2.901  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.pcollectionsFrom  1000000  thrpt  200         1.406 ±       0.015  ops/s

ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList            10  thrpt  200  34567833.775 ±  423910.463  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList           100  thrpt  200  11395084.257 ±   76689.517  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList         10000  thrpt  200    134299.055 ±     602.848  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toArrayList       1000000  thrpt  200       549.064 ±      15.317  ops/s

ModifyingImmutableList.toMutable              10  thrpt  200  32441627.735 ±  391890.514  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toMutable             100  thrpt  200  11505955.564 ±   71394.457  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toMutable           10000  thrpt  200    134819.741 ±     526.830  ops/s
ModifyingImmutableList.toMutable         1000000  thrpt  200       561.031 ±       8.117  ops/s
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  • Nice benchmarks but it looks like some work is done in setup for some benchmarks that should be done in the benchmark itself to compare apples with apples. github.com/KotlinBy/kotlin-benchmarks/commit/… – mfulton26 Oct 24 '16 at 14:12
  • No, because we don't measure cost of creating collections, but modifying. Having right collection is requirements in this case. Depending of what @Eric do, he can create PVector instead of List, so wrapping then not required. Same for mutable case. Cost of TreePVector.from can be another benchmark. – Ruslan Oct 24 '16 at 14:22
  • 1
    I see. Thanks @IRus. From what I understood from Eric's question he has a list and wants to create a copy of it with an updated element so that is why I was thinking that the cost of creating the copy should be included in each benchmark. – mfulton26 Oct 24 '16 at 14:31
  • Note that the call in the toMutable benchmark to toList is unnecessary. A MutableList is already a List. Copying the list is not necessary in order to return a List. – mfulton26 Oct 24 '16 at 14:32
  • So it looks like your answer is, "For large collections, using PVector to begin with (don't convert from a list) is the only way to get decent immutable performance. For small collections, use PVector, toMutable, or toArrayList." Is that your advice? – Eric Apr 17 '18 at 14:21
6

Kotlin's List interface is for "read-only access" to lists which are not necessarily immutable lists. Immutability cannot be enforced via interfaces. Kotlin's stdlib's current implementation for toList calls, in some cases, toMutableList and returns its result as a "read-only access" List.

If you have a List of players and want to efficiently get another List of players with an updated element then one straightforward solution is to copy the list to a MutableList, update the desired element, and then only store a reference to the resulting list using Kotlin's "read-only access" List interface:

val updatedPlayers: List<Player> = players.toMutableList().apply {
    this[2] = updatedPlayer
}

If this is something you intend to do often you might consider creating an extension function to encapsulate the implementation details:

inline fun <T> List<T>.copy(mutatorBlock: MutableList<T>.() -> Unit): List<T> {
    return toMutableList().apply(mutatorBlock)
}

Then you can copy lists with updates more fluently (similar to data class copying) without needing to specify the result type explicitly:

val updatedPlayers = players.copy { this[2] = updatedPlayer }
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0

Edit: With your updated question, I'd say that using map-like operations is the most performant way to do this, since it copies the list only once.


If you're using mutableListOf or normal constructors like ArrayList() to create the instance you can simply cast the List to MutableList:

val mp = players as MutableList<Player>
mp[2] = mp[2].copy(score = 100)

toList/toMutableList will duplicate the list items, so you're right with the performance impact.

However, the idea is actually that if you need mutability, you declare the property as MutableList. You can use a construct like this - using two properties - if you need to expose the list to another object:

private val _players = mutableListOf<Player>()
val players: List<Player> 
       get() = _players.toList()

For the score variable it's similar - if you need to change it, it's OK to declare it as var:

data class Player(val name: String, var score: Int = 0)

In this case, you can also just keep the immutable List and just update the value:

players[2].score = 100

You can find more details on collections in the docs: https://kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/collections.html

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  • 3
    "In Kotlin, a list is always Mutable" That's simply not true. You can get exceptions if you call mutating methods because the underlying list may be anything e.g. an EmptyList. – Kirill Rakhman Oct 21 '16 at 21:12
  • @KirillRakhman you're right, I was actually only referring to lists created with mutableListOf or the standard constructors - updated the answer – Lovis Oct 21 '16 at 21:16
  • and nice to know: listOf (currently) calls to java's Arrays.asList, which actually creates this weird ArrayList that is not really ArrayList, since it's using the array as backing array for performance reasons. – Lovis Oct 21 '16 at 21:22
  • 2
    Sorry, but by "update an element in an immutable list" I meant create a second immutable list with one element updated without modifying the original. I've clarified the question. – Eric Oct 22 '16 at 0:59
0

I don't understand why those 2 approaches are compared in terms of their corresponding performance. In the first one you are traversing over all elements of the collection, in the second one you go straight to the needed one by its index. Traversal doesn't come for free.

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