42

So I know how to find the intersection of two lists by doing:

>>> a = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> b = [1,3,5,6]
>>> list(set(a) & set(b))
[1, 3, 5]

But what is the best way to find all the elements that are not included in the intersection. My initial idea is to create a union of the two lists and then remove all the elements from the intersection from the union, as such:

>>> a = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> b = [1,3,5,6]
>>> intersection = list(set(a) & set(b))
>>> union = list(set(a) | set(b))
>>> non_intersection = intersection - union
[2, 4, 6]

Is this the best way to do this or is there another way?

2
  • 6
    What you're looking for is called the symmetric difference. Sets have a method for it. Try googling.
    – BrenBarn
    Oct 21, 2016 at 20:53
  • 5
    To add on what BrenBarn said, use ^ instead of &.
    – MooingRawr
    Oct 21, 2016 at 20:54

2 Answers 2

68

I usually prefer a shortcut:

set(a) ^ set(b)
{2, 4, 6}
2
  • 2
    hi, out of interest what is the idea with the "^"?
    – Je Je
    Apr 20, 2021 at 3:10
  • 1
    @JeJe The ^ operator in this case is similar to the "XOR" operator for bitwise functions, but for set mathematics. Here it is finding the symmetric difference between two sets, returning a new set composed of only the items that are included in set A or set B, but not both.
    – h0r53
    Sep 8, 2021 at 17:12
20

Symmetric difference?

>>> set(a).symmetric_difference(b)
{2, 4, 6}
4
  • 4
    symmetric_difference takes in any iterable, so there's no need for the second call to set.
    – Alex Hall
    Oct 21, 2016 at 20:59
  • ty! This is ANOTHER reason for preferring the method over the shortcut 😀 The other being: its much more explicit! btw: Looots of these take any iterable!
    – ewerybody
    Oct 1, 2020 at 9:18
  • can this method be used for two pd df and extract non intersecting rows
    – Ayan Mitra
    Nov 5, 2020 at 8:14
  • 1
    symmetric_difference doesn't work on iterable list. Jan 27, 2023 at 3:33

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