3

Hey everyone I'm having problem trying to set up this forloop..but I'm failing

If you look at this picture here

I need to make those little dots be the same color as the big number depending on which section they are in.

I'm adding elements onto the front page through a for loop

for(i = 1; i < 100 ; i++){

 console.log("Number " + i + " with the color red")

}

So for example 1-5, 11-15, 21-25, 31-35, 41,45 would be red

Would I need to use regex?

  • 3
    What have you tried so far to get it to change colour? (No, a regex is not what you need at all, this is a math problem) – Soviut Oct 22 '16 at 6:17
  • Well I mean I have an extreme tedious way of doing more conditional statements but I'm trying to find out the fastest way so my code doesn't look messy – Victor Le Oct 22 '16 at 6:20
  • 3
    Here's a hint: For all the numbers that need to be red, if you divided by 10, the remaineder (modulo operator) would be <= 5. For example 24 % 10 = 4. – xbonez Oct 22 '16 at 6:24
  • 1
    Add a snippet of your logic so we can see what you're attempting and help you correct it. – Soviut Oct 22 '16 at 6:25
  • woooooow. @xbonez I can't believe I didn't think about that! Thank you. That solved my problem! – Victor Le Oct 22 '16 at 6:27
2

You can use the following function that takes as input an integer between 0 and 99 and outputs the section number (1 to 4):

((n % 10 > 4) ? 1 : 2) + ((n > 49) ? 2 : 0)

The final result is made of two parts:

  • ((n % 10 > 4) ? 1 : 2) - this part checks whether the number ends in either 0-4 or 5-9. In the former case, output 1. In the latter, output 2.
  • ((n > 49) ? 2 : 0) - add 2 to the final result if n is 50 or above (to distinguish between sections 1,2 and sections 3,4).

This formula is implemented in the getSectionNumber(n) function in the demo below:

var table = document.querySelector('table tbody');

// n is a number between 0 and 99
// output is a section (1 - 4)
function getSectionNumber(n) {
  return ((n % 10 > 4) ? 1 : 2) + ((n > 49) ? 2 : 0);
}

var sectionColors = {
  1: 'darkred',
  2: 'darkblue',
  3: 'darkgreen',
  4: 'yellow'
};

for(var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
  var row = document.createElement('tr');
  table.appendChild(row);
  for(var j = 0; j < 10; j++) {
    var cell = document.createElement('td');
    var cellId = i*10 + j
    cell.textContent = cellId;
    cell.style.backgroundColor = sectionColors[getSectionNumber(cellId)];
    row.appendChild(cell);
  }
}
<table>
  <tbody>
  </tbody>
</table>

| improve this answer | |
1

Using a ternary operator:

for(i = 1; i < 101 ; i++){
    var color = ((i%10 != 0 && i%10 <= 5) && i<51) ? "red" 
    : ((i%10 === 0 || i%10 > 5) && i<51) ? "green" 
    :((i%10 != 0 && i%10 <= 5) && i>=51) ? "blue" 
    : "pink";
    console.log(i + " - " + color)
}

As SO snippet doesn't console.log all 100 values, here is a JSfiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/jcky4dkp/1/

What does this code do?

The first condition checks if the last digit of the number is less than 6 and if the number itself is less than 51:

(i%10 != 0 && i%10 <= 5) && i<51

If that's true you'll have "red", otherwise it will check the second condition, if the last digit of the number is greater than 5 and if the number itself is less than 51:

(i%10 === 0 || i%10 > 5) && i<51

If that's true you'll have "green", otherwise it will check the third condition, if the last digit of the number is less than 6 and if the number itself is greater than 51:

(i%10 != 0 && i%10 <= 5) && i>51

If that's true you'll have "blue", otherwise, it will return "pink"

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The code is good but please make this a complete answer by explaining what you're doing and why this works. – Soviut Oct 22 '16 at 6:26
  • 1
    Woooow. This is much faster :D OP should look at this answer. – user6879896 Oct 22 '16 at 7:51

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