-1

I am trying to create 1-n relationship using entity framework code first approach. Following are my classes

public class User
{

    [Key]
    public int UserID { get; set; }


    //public virtual Vote Vote { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Email { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Bio { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Education { get; set; }
    [Required]
    public string Experience { get; set; }

    public string Password { get; set; }

}

and following is my second class

public class Vote
{
    [Required]
    [Key]
    public int VoteID { get; set; }

    [ForeignKey("UserID")]
    [Required]
    public virtual User User { get; set; }

    //public virtual int UserID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public int VoteCount { get; set; }
    [Required]

    public  int UserID { get; set; }


}

the user and vote and 1-n relationship, in my case what I mean is that UserID should be foreign key in Vote table. But when I done creating db with following commands

   enable-migrations -ContextTypeName ProfileOne.PO -Force

   Add-migration PO

   update-database

I am not getting any foreign key OR column name UserID

Any help will be appreciated why I am not able to achieve the result.

3
  • 1
    This should create a Vote table with UserID. But the relationship is 1-n (user has many votes), not 1-1. If UserID is not created something else is wrong in code we can't see. – Gert Arnold Oct 22 '16 at 9:25
  • I would believe in this scenario EF expects a one-to-one relationship. Depending on EF version, the attribute may be ignored as the convention uses the PK as FK in such a relationship. – DevilSuichiro Oct 22 '16 at 11:02
  • This should create the Foreign Key. We're missing part of the puzzle here. Easy enough to create an minimal reproducible example for this kind of problem. – Henk Holterman Oct 24 '16 at 8:20
1

Try to use the following approach:

public class User
{
    [Key]
    public int UserID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Email { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Bio { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Education { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Experience { get; set; }

    public string Password { get; set; }        


    //Navigation properties
    public virtual ICollection<Vote> Votes { get; set; }
}


public class Vote
{
    [Key]
    public int VoteID { get; set; } 

    [Required]
    public int VoteCount { get; set; }  


    //Foreign key for User
    [Required]
    public int UserID { get; set; } 

    //Navigation properties
    public virtual User User { get; set; }
}


For more information, have a look at Entity Relationships. Hope this helps...

0
-1

Modify you're classes to look like:

public class User
{
    [Key]
    public int UserID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Email { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Bio { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Education { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Experience { get; set; }

    public string Password { get; set; }

    public virtual Vote Vote { get; set; }
}

public class Vote
{
    [Required]
    [Key]
    public int VoteID { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public int VoteCount { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public  int UserID { get; set; }

    //[ForeignKey("UserID")]
    //[Required]
    public virtual User User { get; set; }
}

The relationship between 2 entities is defined by the virtual properties, which u commented them.

1
  • 1
    No. The attributes are redundant (the naming conventions do the same thing), but certainly not wrong. Nor is the virtual modifier required. – Gert Arnold Oct 22 '16 at 9:27

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