Here i am trying to implement sieve of erastosthene in c.The program works fine except one major problem.I manually set the first prime number to be of value 2.But at the end when i loop through all the prime numbers array and print them ,the first value becomes 1 instead of 2.Can't figure out why this problem arises.Any help would be much appreciated.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<math.h>
int main(){

    int n = 64;
    int i,j,limit=sqrt(n)+2,nPrime=0;
    int prime[50]={0},mark[64]={0};
    mark[1]=1;

    prime[nPrime++] = 2;
    printf("%d\n",prime[0]); // initialized to 2



    for(i=4;i<=n;i=i+2){
       mark[i] = 1;
    }
    for(i=3;i<=n;i=i+2){
       if(!mark[i]){
           prime[nPrime++] = i;
           if(i<=limit){
              for(j=i*i;j<=n;j=j+i*2){
                 mark[j]=1;
              }
           }
       }
    }
    int k;
    int size = sizeof(prime)/sizeof(prime[0]);
    printf("%d\n",prime[0]);  // changed to 1;
    for(k=0;k<size && prime[k]!=0;k++){
        printf("%d ",prime[k]);
    }

}
  • 2
    This breaches your mark[64] array: for(i=4;i<=n;i=i+2) mark[i] = 1;. The array is only 64 elements, indexed from 0..63. The loop above will write to mark[64], invoking undefined behavior (and overwriting your prime slot 0 as a bonus. That <= should be <. – WhozCraig Oct 22 '16 at 9:29
  • ok,,thanks...but why it will overwrite prime array ?:| – AL-zami Oct 22 '16 at 9:31
  • 1
    Because it can. UB invocation means anything can happen (including the unlucky scenario where it even appears to work correctly). Architecturally is likely dependent on the way automatic variables are allocated into their implementation stack space. Be glad you caught it. UB is no fun place. – WhozCraig Oct 22 '16 at 9:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is in this loop:

for(i=4;i<=n;i=i+2) {
    mark[i] = 1;
}

The condition should be i < n, because with <= it will take the value 64, and that would be out of bounds.

When you set mark[64] = 1 you are modifying memory that does not belong to the mark array, in this case it turn out to be the first element of the prime array. If you test out other indexes, you could end up getting a segfault.

If you set manually mark[64] = 56, you will see that prime[0] == 56

Because local variable are declared on stack, in your case the variable mark[64] which is an array of 64 integer (64 * 4 = 256 bytes) occupies the first 256 bytes of the stack then the array prime (50 * 4 = 200 bytes) occupies the next 200 bytes as shown below:

                           Stack
                       |-----------|
                       |   other   |
                       | variables |
                       |           |
            prime[49]->|-----------| addr = 0x000001C8
                       |           |
                       |   prime   |
                       |(200 bytes)|
             prime[0]->|           |
             mark[63]->|-----------| addr = 0x00000100 
                       |           |
                       |           |
                       |   mark    |
                       |(256 bytes)| 
                       |           |
              mark[0]->|-----------| addr = 0x00000000

When you write mark[64] = 1, you are actually writing the four bytes of prime[0] = 1.

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