1

I'm trying to push a list of collected items (fruits) to an empty array outside of the loop.

Then I want to access each fruit from the array with addEventListener, and append them to a container (fruit basket) on click.

I got the function itself to work fine in a different way: https://jsfiddle.net/ec4hqas2/

However that's with the eventListener inside the loop, I want it outside, like this:

https://jsfiddle.net/ec4hqas2/8/

(function() {

  var fruits = document.querySelectorAll('.list li');
  var fruit_basket = document.querySelector('.fruit-basket');
  var fruits_array = [];

  for (var i = 0; i < fruits.length; i++) {
    // Returns only numbers
    fruits_array.push(i);

    /* This returns the entire NodeList:
    fruits_array.push(fruits[i]); 
    */
  }
  console.log(fruits_array); // result: [0,1,2]

  // Append each clicked fruit to fruit basket
  fruits_array[i].addEventListener('click', function() {
    fruit_basket.appendChild(this);

  });

})();

Problem is that I can only manage to push the number of fruits from the loop to the array. How do I push the entire list item elements with their fruit name to the empty array?

The reason I'm trying to do this, is that I recall being told that keeping eventListener out of loop was a good practice, but I might have mixed things up, is this a bad idea in the first place?

I read these articles trying to wrap my head around NodeLists & Arrays, but I'm still confused: https://davidwalsh.name/nodelist-array https://toddmotto.com/a-comprehensive-dive-into-nodelists-arrays-converting-nodelists-and-understanding-the-dom/

Any help greatly appreciated! :-)

2

Adding the event-listener inside, or outside, a loop doesn't really matter what tends to be the problem is creating a function multiple times within the loop, as you are with your anonymous function:

for (var i = 0; i < fruits.length; i++) {
  var fruit = fruits[i];
  fruit.addEventListener('click', function() {
    fruit_basket.appendChild(this)
  });
}

The 'better' way, which avoids the recreation of the anonymous function on each loop would be to use a named function and assign that function as the event-handler within the loop:

// declaring the variables using let,
// first we retrieve all of the <li> elements held
// inside of an ancestor element with the class of
// 'list':
let fruits = document.querySelectorAll('.list li'),

// retrieving only the first - if any - element with
// the class of 'fruit-basket':
  fruit_basket = document.querySelector('.fruit-basket');

// creating a named-function, to avoid re-recreating
// an anonymous function, which will be bound as the
// event-handler later:
function addToBasket(event) {
  // the 'event' object, as well as the 'this'
  // is passed automatically from the
  // EventTarget.addEventListener() method,
  // the event.target is the element upon
  // which the listened-for event was first
  // triggered (here the <li> or a descendant
  // of that <li>):
  fruit_basket.appendChild(event.target);
}

for (let i = 0; i < fruits.length; i++) {

  // iterating through the NodeList returned
  // by document.querySelectorAll() and binding
  // the addToBasket function as the event-handler
  // for the 'click' event:
  fruits[i].addEventListener('click', addToBasket);
}

let fruits = document.querySelectorAll('.list li'),
  fruit_basket = document.querySelector('.fruit-basket');

function addToBasket(event) {
  fruit_basket.appendChild(event.target);
}

for (let i = 0; i < fruits.length; i++) {
  fruits[i].addEventListener('click', addToBasket);
}
ul {
  border: 1px solid #f90;
  width: 80%;
  margin: 0 auto 1em auto;
  border-radius: 0.5em;
  min-height: 6em;
  line-height: 2em;
}
<ul class="list">
  <li>Apple</li>
  <li>Banana</li>
  <li>Orange</li>
</ul>

<ul class="fruit-basket">

</ul>

JS Fiddle demo.

Incidentally there is an alternative means, using the <ul> elements:

// again, creating a named-function to act as the
// event-handler:
function addToBasket(event) {
  // finding the relevant element to which
  // the event.target should be appended as
  // a child, and appending the event.target:
  document.querySelector('.fruit-basket').appendChild(event.target);
}

// here we create an Array from the Array-like
// NodeList returned by document.querySelectorAll:    
Array.from(
  document.querySelectorAll('ul')

// iterating over that Array of nodes:
).forEach(

  // we use an Arrow function to bind the addToBasket
  // function as the event-handler for the 'click'
  // event on each of the <ul> elements:
  list => list.addEventListener('click', addToBasket)
);

let fruits = document.querySelectorAll('.list li'),
  fruit_basket = document.querySelector('.fruit-basket');

function addToBasket(event) {
  document.querySelector('.fruit-basket').appendChild(event.target);
}

Array.from(
  document.querySelectorAll('ul')
).forEach(
  list => list.addEventListener('click', addToBasket)
);
ul {
  border: 1px solid #f90;
  width: 80%;
  margin: 0 auto 1em auto;
  border-radius: 0.5em;
  min-height: 6em;
  line-height: 2em;
}
<ul class="list">
  <li>Apple</li>
  <li>Banana</li>
  <li>Orange</li>
</ul>

<ul class="fruit-basket">

</ul>

JS Fiddle demo.

References:

| improve this answer | |
  • Wow thank you so much for the detailed response! I think I get most of your code. Is the problem with the anonymous function inside the loop that it gets recreated every time the loop runs? So 3 times in my code example? With your code, we have a named function created only once, and it only gets used when the user clicks (event.target) on an element? I'm really trying to wrap my head around this, and I clearly have a lot of studying to do! – Capax Oct 22 '16 at 14:05
2

You don't even need a for loop.

Add a event listener to the container and append the e.target into the fruit-basket

var fruits = document.querySelectorAll('.list');
var fruit_basket = document.querySelector('.fruit-basket');

fruits[0].addEventListener('click', function(e) {
    if(e.target.tagName === 'LI')
      fruit_basket.appendChild(e.target)    
});

Working Fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/h0zmkyyn/

| improve this answer | |
  • If there's only one .list element, you may as well avoid fruits[0] and simply retrieve the element with document.querySelector('.list'). – David says reinstate Monica Oct 22 '16 at 12:27
  • Good Point. The OP had querySelectorAll. So, I guess that's the intent !. Thanks for pointing out. – Pranesh Ravi Oct 22 '16 at 12:29
1

You've been told wrong, you have to add the event listeners to each element individually anyway, so you have to use a loop.

The collection of elements is already an array-like nodeList, so there's no need for an additional array.

What you could do, is define the callback outside the loop, so the function isn't defined for every iteration, but it won't really matter much for just a few elements

(function() {

    var fruits       = document.querySelectorAll('.list li');
    var fruit_basket = document.querySelector('.fruit-basket');
    var cb_func      = function() {
        fruit_basket.appendChild(this);
    };

    for (var i = 0; i < fruits.length; i++) {
        fruits[i].addEventListener('click', cb_func);
    }

})();
| improve this answer | |

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