8

I want to write a function to sum the numbers from zero to n. (Ideally, this would be generic over all numbers, but I will settle for i32).

mod squares {

    pub fn sum_from_zero( n: i32) -> i32 {
        [0 .. n].fold(0, |a, b| a + b)
    }
}

#[test]
fn test_sum_from_zero() {
    assert_eq!(15, squares::sum_from_zero(5));
}

I get the following compiler error:

src/lib.rs:5:18: 5:22 error: no method named `fold` found for type `[std::ops::Range<i32>; 1]` in the current scope
src/lib.rs:5         [0 .. n].fold(0, |a, b| a + b)
                              ^~~~
src/lib.rs:5:18: 5:22 note: the method `fold` exists but the following trait bounds were not satisfied: `[std::ops::Range<i32>; 1] : std::iter::Iterator`, `[std::ops::Range<i32>] : std::iter::Iterator`

I've also tried this with sum():

mod squares {

    pub fn sum_from_zero( n: i32) -> i32 {
        [0 .. n].sum()
    }
}

#[test]
fn test_sum_from_zero() {
    assert_eq!(15, squares::sum_from_zero(5));
}

And got the following compiler error:

src/lib.rs:5:18: 5:21 error: no method named `sum` found for type `[std::ops::Range<i32>; 1]` in the current scope
src/lib.rs:5         [0 .. n].sum()
                              ^~~
src/lib.rs:5:18: 5:21 note: the method `sum` exists but the following trait bounds were not satisfied: `[std::ops::Range<i32>; 1] : std::iter::Iterator`, `[std::ops::Range<i32>] : std::iter::Iterator`
src/lib.rs:5:18: 5:21 error: no method named `sum` found for type `[std::ops::Range<i32>; 1]` in the current scope
src/lib.rs:5         [0 .. n].sum()
                              ^~~
src/lib.rs:5:18: 5:21 note: the method `sum` exists but the following trait bounds were not satisfied: `[std::ops::Range<i32>; 1] : std::iter::Iterator`, `[std::ops::Range<i32>] : std::iter::Iterator`

Do I have to declare explicit bounds/traits?

1
  • 1
    You're creating a single-element array of Range<i32> types (aka [std::ops::Range<i32>; 1]). You probably just mean (0 .. n), which just changes operator precedence so that you're not invoking sum() on n. (Playground Example) – Aurora0001 Oct 22 '16 at 17:29
16

The problem is that you are creating an array of ranges (square brackets) but you just wanted the range (on which fold is defined).

Another thing is that range syntax (..) is only inclusive of the lower bound. It's exclusive of the upper bound so you have to iterate up to n+1 to get the desired result.

mod squares {

    pub fn sum_from_zero( n: i32) -> i32 {
        (0 .. n+1).fold(0, |a, b| a + b)
    }
}

#[test]
fn test_sum_from_zero() {
    assert_eq!(15, squares::sum_from_zero(5));
}
6
  • 3
    As of Rust 1.11, the Iterator trait has a sum method and ranges are iterators, so no need to fold. Also, no mention of n×(n+1)/2? – mcarton Oct 22 '16 at 18:22
  • 2
    @mcarton: Let's presume that he is interested in learning how to iterate and not in the closed form :) – Matthieu M. Oct 22 '16 at 19:37
  • Thanks arjan, mcarton, and matthieu-m. Yes, I like the Guass-ian shortcut, and yes, I'm really just trying to play with iterators, filters, and other FP things in Rust. Too much context switching between Rust and Haskell, I had confused the syntax for Range literals. – Jon Wolski Oct 22 '16 at 20:03
  • 1
    FWIW, on current stable Rust (release 1.9.0) I cannot use sum (github.com/rust-lang/rust/issues/27739). – Jon Wolski Oct 22 '16 at 20:07
  • 4
    @JonWolski Current stable is 1.12.1 – Arjan Oct 22 '16 at 20:20

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