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As you can see from the two images, I am trying to add a bunch of tappable tiles that a user can play with. In order to make these images tappable I decided to utilize a switch statement from this calculator app. Is there a way to turn the switch statement, that is involved with these tiles, into a loop or function, instead of this god-awful long piece of code? Perhaps something like this?

onTapped(arg0.getId, [R.id.tile1, R.id.tile2, R.id.tile3, R.id.tile4, R.id.tile5, R.id.tile6, R.id.tile7], ['l','e','a','s','t')

onTapped(id, listOfTiles, listOfLetters){
     int i = 0;
     for each tile:
          if (!tile1_flag) {                                                                     
                str = str.append(listOfLetters[i++]);                                                             
                disp.setText(str);                                                                 
                tile1.setColorFilter(Color.argb(150, 200, 200, 200));
                tile1_flag = true;                                                                 
                break; 

Here's the original function.

boolean tile1_flag = false;
boolean tile2_flag = false;
boolean tile3_flag = false;
boolean tile4_flag = false;
boolean tile5_flag = false;
boolean tile6_flag = false;
boolean tile7_flag = false;
.
.
.
 public void onClick(View arg0) {                                                                   
    TextView disp = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.tileOutput);                                      
    Editable str = (Editable) disp.getText();                                                      
    switch (arg0.getId()) {                                                                        
        case R.id.tile1:                                                                           
            if (!tile1_flag) {                                                                     
                str = str.append('l');                                                             
                disp.setText(str);                                                                 
                tile1.setColorFilter(Color.argb(150, 200, 200, 200));
                tile1_flag = true;                                                                 
                break;                                                                             
            } else {                                                                               
                break;                                                                             
            }
        case R.id.tile2:
            if (!tile2_flag) {
                str = str.append('e');
                disp.setText(str);
                tile2.setColorFilter(Color.argb(150, 200, 200, 200));
                tile2_flag = true;
                break;
            } else {
                break;
            }
        case R.id.tile3:
            if (!tile3_flag) {
                str = str.append('a');
                disp.setText(str);
                tile3.setColorFilter(Color.argb(150, 200, 200, 200));
                tile3_flag = true;
                break;
            } else {
                break;
            }
        case R.id.tile5:
            if (!tile5_flag) {
                str = str.append('s');
                disp.setText(str);
                tile4.setColorFilter(Color.argb(150, 200, 200, 200));
                tile4_flag = true;
                break;
            } else {
                break;
            }
        case R.id.tile6:
            if (!tile6_flag) {
                str = str.append('t');
                disp.setText(str);
                tile4.setColorFilter(Color.argb(150, 200, 200, 200));
                tile4_flag = true;
                break;
            } else {
                break;
            }
  • Look at the repeated code. Figure out what's different and what's the same. Put the code into a function, and make the parts that are the same the function body. Then, pass in the parts that change, and use the function – Carcigenicate Oct 22 '16 at 20:25
  • The only way to do that will be to create the images in code and add them in an array, that way you'll be able to have your loop – zon7 Oct 22 '16 at 20:26
  • loops is the optimized way wth object list – silentsudo Oct 23 '16 at 6:55
1

You can create inner class with all image properties, like this

class ImageProperties {
    public boolean titleFlag;
    public String appendLetter;
    ...
    ImageProperties(boolean titleFlag, String appendLetter, ...) {
        this.titleFlag = titleFlag;
        ...
    }
}

and than fill them add as tag to your corresponding image e.g.

ImageView title1 = (ImageView) findViewById(R.id.title1);
title1.setTag(new ImageProperties(false, "l"))

and finally get them in

public void onClick(View arg0) {
    ImageView imageView = (ImageView) arg0;
    ImageProperties imageProperties = (ImageProperties) arg0.getTag();
    if (!imageProperties.titleFlag) {
        str = str.append(imageProperties.appendLetter);
        disp.setText(str);
        imageView.setColorFilter(Color.argb(150, 200, 200, 200));
        imageProperties.titleFlag = true;
    }
}
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