13

In Swift 3, the String structure does not seem to have an initializer init(_: Int) that will allow the conversion from an Int to a String. My question is why does let i = String(3) work? What String method or initializer is it calling? Thanks.

4 Answers 4

35

For anyone just looking to convert an int to string in Swift 3:

let text = "\(myInt)"
2
  • Your response did not address the question Commented Feb 14, 2017 at 1:35
  • 5
    agree with the comment but this did help me with what I was looking for
    – Josh
    Commented May 14, 2017 at 18:13
12

It's calling init(_:) (or init(_:) for UnsignedInteger) arguments of the String class.

Rather than defining separate initializers for Int, Int64, Int32, Int16, Int8, UInt, UInt64, UInt32, UInt16, and UInt8, Apple made two generic initializers: one for SignedInteger types, and one for UnsignedInteger types.

6

For people who want to convert optional Integers to Strings on Swift 3,

String(describing:YourInteger ?? 0)
1
  • 1
    It was the Swift compiler that prompted me to switch to describing, not me! not me!
    – Satheesh
    Commented Sep 21, 2017 at 3:17
0

I saw this solution to somebody, thank you, to that person, I don't remember who.

infix operator ???: NilCoalescingPrecedence

public func ???<T>(optional: T?, defaultValue: @autoclosure () -> String) -> String {
    switch optional {
    case let value?: return String(describing: value)
    case nil: return defaultValue()
    }
}

For example:

let text = "\(yourInteger ??? "0")" 
3
  • Could you elaborate on how to implement that... please?
    – Joe Sene
    Commented Sep 28, 2017 at 0:35
  • I have UtilsView.swift, in this library I have other functions that I use in all project. A function is , infix operator ???: NilCoalescingPrecedence public func ???<T>(optional: T?, defaultValue: @autoclosure () -> String) -> String { switch optional { case let value?: return String(describing: value) case nil: return defaultValue() } }
    – Mercedes
    Commented Sep 28, 2017 at 11:47
  • I really wouldn't recommend this. String(yourInteger) ?? "default" isn't that long, and IMO doesn't justify introducing a layer of indirection in the course code (because inevitably your reads will have to go jump to read your ???'s implementation, since they'll have no idea what that means)
    – Alexander
    Commented Dec 28, 2020 at 4:13

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