88

Check Number prime in JavaScript

let inputValue= 7;
let isprime=inputValue==1? false:true;  //bcoz 1 is not prime

for(let i=2;i<inputValue;i++){
  inputValue%i==0? isprime*=false :isprime*=true;
};

alert(`${inputValue} is ${isprime? 'prime':'not prime'} number`);

4
  • your for loop will never iterate more than once. Oct 23, 2016 at 6:14
  • @ShashwatKumar please explain why and how to fix this Oct 29, 2016 at 21:41
  • This is very inefficient, don't use loops for something like this... Check my answer for the most CPU easy way to find a prime number... here
    – 255.tar.xz
    Nov 23, 2019 at 18:25
  • 1
    code stream used your code to promote their software.... i think thats funny
    – vik
    Jun 10, 2020 at 16:38

42 Answers 42

1
2
-1

This is how I'd do it:

function isPrime(num) {
  if(num < 2) return false;
  if(num == 2) return true;
  for(var i = 2; i < num; i++) {
    if(num % i === 0) return false;
  }
  return true;
}
-1
(function(value){
    var primeArray = [];
    for(var i = 2; i <= value; i++){ 
        if((i === 2) || (i === 3) || (i === 5) || (i === 7)){ 
            primeArray.push(i);
        }
          else if((i % 2 !== 0) && (i % 3 !== 0) && (i % 5 !== 0) && (i % 7 !== 0)){ 
              primeArray.push(i);
          }
        } 
       console.log(primeArray);
}(100));
2
  • 2
    Please explain your answers. As is, this is just a code dump Mar 27, 2018 at 18:10
  • This ONLY works with input <=120. It doesn't generically find prime numbers, only finds those that do not have 2, 3, 5, 7 as divisors. However, it claims 121 is prime, and it's not: 11 * 11 = 121. Any number where all prime divisors (other than 1) are odd numbers larger than 9 are added to primeArray.
    – VLAZ
    Jan 31 at 10:53
-1

My Solution,

function isPrimeNumber(number){
  if(number <= 1) return false;
  if(number <= 3) return true;
  for(let i = 2; i < 9; i++) {
    if(number === i) continue;
    if(number % i === 0 ) return false;
  }  
  return true;
}

for(let i = 0; i <= 100; i++){
  if (isPrimeNumber(i)) console.log(i);
}

1
  • This falsely reports large numbers as primes. Only checks if the number is divisible by 1-9 but for example 11 * 13 = 143 and that number is considered prime because it has no single digit divisors. So it only really works for the range from 1 to 9*9 where numbers will have single digit divisors. This basically coincides with the demonstration.
    – VLAZ
    Jan 30 at 12:33
-1

Here is an optimized solution to prevent loop through all the range number.

  function isPrime(num) {
    for (let i = 2; i <= Math.sqrt(num); i++) {
      if (num % i == 0)
        return false;
    }
    return true;
  }
-1

We can find prime number up to n with only one loop, also I am increasing loop by +2:

function primeNumber(n) {
    let arr = [];
    if (n <= 1) return false;
    if (n === 2) return true;
    let flag = true;
    for (let i = 3; i < n; i += 2) {
        if (n % i == 0) {
            flag = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    return flag;
}
// It will retrun bollean true/false
// primeNumber(11)  true
// primeNumber(12)  false

Best part is complexity would be o(n/2)

1
  • this returns true for 4
    – lechat
    Sep 18, 2021 at 6:30
-1

You are trying to check too much conditions. just one loop is required to check for a prime no.

function isPrime(num) {
  if (num == 2)
    return true;
  for (i = 2; i < Math.sqrt(num); i++) // mathematical property-no number has both of its factors greater than the square root 
  {
    if (num % i == 0)
      return false; // otherwise it's a prime no.
  }
  return true;
}

You have to consider every no. a prime no. unless it is divisible by some no. less than or equal to the square root.

Your solution has got a return statement for every case,thus it stops execution before it should.It doesn't check any number more than once.It gives wrong answer for multiple cases-- 15,35.. in fact for every no. that is odd.

1
  • In your code you write i<Math.sqrt(num) which is wrong, should be <= (it's correct in your text though); also the first if statement is redundant
    – DonFuchs
    Apr 30, 2020 at 17:33
-2

Following code uses most efficient way of looping to check if a given number is prime.

function checkPrime(number){    
    if (number==2 || number==3) {
    return true
}
    if(number<2 ||number % 2===0){
        return false
    }
    else{
        for (let index = 3; index <= Math.sqrt(number); index=index+2) {
            if (number%index===0) {
                return false
            }        
        }
    }
    return true
}
  1. First check rules out 2 and lesser numbers and all even numbers
  2. Using Math.sqrt() to minimize the looping count
  3. Incrementing loop counter by 2, skipping all even numbers, further reducing loop count by half
-2

The only even prime number is 2, so we should exclude even numbers from the loop.

function isPrime(a) {
    if (a < 2) return false;
    if (a > 2) {
        if (a % 2 == 0) return false;
        for (let x = 3; x <= Math.sqrt(a); x += 2) {
            if (a % x == 0) return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
-2

this is a simple way i hope it helps :)

function isPrime(n) {
    if (n <= 1) return false;
    if (n === 2) return true;
    if (n % 2 === 0) return false;

    let arrayDis = [];

    for (let i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
        let count = n/i; 
        if (Number.isInteger(count)) arrayDis.push(count);
    }
      
    if(arrayDis.length > 2) return false
        
    return true;
}

console.log(isPrime(121)); // false

-2

I barely understand people's code, so here is mine (idk if they are not too clean but i think it's very easy to understand)

    function primeNum (x){

//Array created for final checking
        const primeArray =[];
    
//Use for loop for filtering all possibility numbers that have 0 modulo

        for (var i = 1 ; i <= x ; i++){
            if (x % i === 0){
                primeArray.push(i)
            }
        }
    

//Check the primeArray use if statement

        if (primeArray.length === 2){
            return "it's a prime boys"
        } else {
            return "it's not a prime sorry to say"
        }
    }

the concept is simple, prime number is a number that only can divied by only 2 numbers and has modulo equal to 0 (x % i === 0). So if the primeArray has length more than 2 (more than 2 numbers), it's not a prime number.

i don't know what people says about my code, i need your advice guys. Best Regards.

2
  • Hi wa1. This is not the place to post code for review. Please only post code which is meant to be a solution for the problem described in the question at the top of this page. Ideally add some explanation of how the code works and why it solves the problem described in the question at the top of the page. The tour you took should have explained that concept and here are more details: How to Answer. Otherwise welcome to StackOverflow and have fun.
    – Yunnosch
    Sep 11, 2022 at 0:17
  • 1
    Extremely inefficient as well as misleading. The primeArray is the array of all integer divisors of x. Given x = 2520 this would find all 10 divisors [1..10] only to check if there is two of them. Even if this approach is taken, there is no need for an array, just a counter. And the algorithm can stop if it finds a third divisor. But even then it's not very efficient. For example, it will do useless loops for any even number which (except 2) are all guaranteed to not be prime.
    – VLAZ
    Jan 30 at 10:06
-2

BEST SOLUTION

I an unsure if I understand the concept of Time complexity: O(sqrt(n)) and Space complexity: O(1) in this context but the function prime(n) is probably the fastest way (least iterations) to calculate if a number is prime number of any size.

https://github.com/ganeshkbhat/fastprimenumbers, https://www.npmjs.com/package/fast-prime

This probably is the BEST solution in the internet as of today 11th March 2022. Feedback and usage is welcome.

This same code can be applied in any languages like C, C++, Go Lang, Java, .NET, Python, Rust, etc with the same logic and have performance benefits. It is pretty fast. I have not seen this implemented before and has been indigenously done.

If you are looking at the speed and performance here is the """BEST""" hopeful solution I can give:

Max iterations 16666 for n == 100000 instead of 100000 of conventional way

The codes can also be found here: https://github.com/ganeshkbhat/fastprimecalculations

If you use it for your project please spend 2 minutes of your time crediting me by letting me know by either sending me an email, or logging an Github issue with subject heading [User], or star my Github project. But let me know here https://github.com/ganeshkbhat/fastprimecalculations. I would love to know the fans and users of the code logic

function prime(n) {
    if ((n === 2 || n === 3 || n === 5 || n === 7)) {
        return true
    }
    if (n === 1 || ((n > 7) && (n % 5 == 0 || n % 7 == 0 || n % 2 == 0 || n % 3 == 0))) {
        return false
    }
    if ((Number.isInteger(((n - 1) / 6))) || (Number.isInteger((n + 1) / 6))) {
        for (let i = 1; i < n; i++) {
            let factorsix = (i * 6)
            let five = n / (5 + factorsix), seven = n / (7 + factorsix)
            if (((five > 1) && Number.isInteger(five)) || ((seven > 1) && (Number.isInteger(seven)))) {
                return false;
            }
            if (factorsix > n) {
                break;
            }
        }
        return true
    }
    return false
}

Here is an analysis of all the ways of calculation:

Conventional way of checking for prime:

function isPrimeConventionalWay(n) {
    count = 0
    // Corner case
    if (n <= 1)
        return false;
    // Check from 2 to n-1
    // Max iterations 99998 for n == 100000 
    for (let i = 2; i < n; i++) {
        // Counting Iterations
        count += 1
        if (n % i == 0) {
            console.log("count: Prime Conventional way", count)
            return false;
        }
    }
    console.log("count: Prime Conventional way", count)
    return true;
}

SQUAREROOT way of checking for prime:

function isPrimeSquareRootWay(num) {
    count = 0
    // if not is_number num return false
    if (num < 2) {
        console.log("count: Prime Squareroot way", count)
        return false
    }

    for (let i = 2, s = Math.sqrt(num); i <= s; i++) {
        // Counting Iterations
        count += 1
        if (num % i === 0) {
            console.log("count: Prime Squareroot way", count)
            return false
        }
    }
    console.log("count: Prime Squareroot way", count)
    return true
}

SUGGESTED way of checking for prime:

function prime(n) {
    let count = 0
    if ((n === 2 || n === 3 || n === 5 || n === 7)) {
        // console.log("count: Prime Unconventional way", count)
        return true
    }
    if (n === 1 || ((n > 7) && (n % 5 == 0 || n % 7 == 0 || n % 2 == 0 || n % 3 == 0))) {
        // console.log("count: Prime Unconventional way", count)
        return false
    }
    if ((Number.isInteger(((n - 1) / 6))) || (Number.isInteger((n + 1) / 6))) {
        for (let i = 1; i < n; i++) {
            // Counting Iterations
            count += 1
            let factorsix = (i * 6)
            let five = n / (5 + factorsix), seven = n / (7 + factorsix)
            if (((five > 1) && Number.isInteger(five)) || ((seven > 1) && (Number.isInteger(seven)))) {
                // console.log("count: Prime Unconventional way", count)
                return false;
            }
            if (factorsix > n) {
                // Max iterations 16666 for n == 100000 instead of 100000
                break;
            }
        }
        // console.log("count: Prime Unconventional way", count)
        return true
    }
    // console.log("count: Prime Unconventional way", count)
    return false
}
    

Tests to compare with the traditional way of checking for prime numbers.

    function test_primecalculations() {
            let count = 0, iterations = 100000;
            let arr = [];
            for (let i = 1; i <= iterations; i++) {
                let traditional = isPrimeConventionalWay(i), newer = prime(i);
                if (traditional == newer) {
                    count = count + 1
                } else {
                    arr.push([traditional, newer, i])
                }
            }
            console.log("[count, iterations, arr] list: ", count, iterations, arr)
            if (count === iterations) {
                return true;
            }
            return false;
        }
        
    console.log("Tests Passed: ", test_primecalculations())
    
    

You will see the results of count of number of iterations as below for check of prime number: 100007:

console.log("Is Prime 100007: ", isPrimeConventionalWay(100007))
console.log("Is Prime 100007: ", isPrimeSquareRootWay(100007))
console.log("Is Prime 100007: ", prime(100007))
count: Prime Conventional way 96
Is Prime 100007:  false
count: Prime Squareroot way 96
Is Prime 100007:  false
count: Prime Unconventional way 15
Is Prime 100007:  false

Performance Tests:

let iterations = 1000000;
let isPrimeConventionalWayArr = [], isPrimeSquarerootWayArr = [], primeArr = [], isprimeAKSWayArr = []
let performance = require('perf_hooks').performance;
// let performance = window.performance;

function tests_performance_isPrimeConventionalWayArr(){
    for (let i = 1; i <= iterations; i++){
        let start = performance.now()
        isPrimeConventionalWay(30000239)
        let end = performance.now()
        isPrimeConventionalWayArr.push(end - start)
    }
}
tests_performance_isPrimeConventionalWayArr()

function tests_performance_isPrimeSquarerootWayArr(){
    for (let i = 1; i <= iterations; i++){
        let start = performance.now()
        isPrimeSquarerootWay(30000239)
        let end = performance.now()
        isPrimeSquarerootWayArr.push(end - start)
    } 
}
tests_performance_isPrimeSquarerootWayArr()

function tests_performance_primeArr(){
    for (let i = 1; i <= iterations; i++){
        let start = performance.now()
        prime(30000239)
        let end = performance.now()
        primeArr.push(end - start)
    }
}
tests_performance_primeArr()


function calculateAverage(array) {
    var total = 0;
    var count = 0;
    array.forEach(function(item, index) {
        total += item;
        count++;
    });
    return total / count;
}

console.log("isPrimeConventionalWayArr: ", calculateAverage(isPrimeConventionalWayArr))
console.log("isPrimeSquarerootWayArr: ", calculateAverage(isPrimeSquarerootWayArr))
console.log("primeArr (suggested): ", calculateAverage(primeArr))

Sample 1 Million Iterations

Iteration 1:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00011065770072489977
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.0001288754000402987
primeArr (suggested):  0.00005511959937214852
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010504549999162554

Iteration 2:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00011061320009082556
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.00012810260016098618
primeArr (suggested):  0.00005620509984344244
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010411459982022643

Iteration 3:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00010952920047193766
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.0001286292002275586
primeArr (suggested):  0.00005520999948307872
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010410030033439397

Iteration 4:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00011091169972717762
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.00012648080018162728
primeArr (suggested):  0.00005570890004560351
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010492690009251237

Iteration 5:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00010998740004003048
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.00012748069976270199
primeArr (suggested):  0.000060324400294572114
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010445670029893518

Iteration 6:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00011286130072548985
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.00012876759915798902
primeArr (suggested):  0.00005682649992406368
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.0001073473998978734

Iteration 7:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.0001092233005464077
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.0001272089005112648
primeArr (suggested):  0.00006196610003709793
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.000105714200142771

Iteration 8:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00010890220178663731
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.00012892659988626836
primeArr (suggested):  0.000055275400444865224
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010486920177191496

Iteration 9:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00011153739924356342
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.00012576029987260699
primeArr (suggested):  0.00005680049995332956
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010467480102181434

Iteration 10:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00011035799815505743
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.0001265768006257713
primeArr (suggested):  0.00005575320014730096
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010596680009737611

Sample 10 Million (10000000) Iterations

Iteration 1:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00011928780986890197
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.00012412049009799956
primeArr (suggested):  0.00005793778010234237
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010363322006165981

Iteration 2:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00010635640006065368
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.00012505082993544638
primeArr (suggested):  0.000053171040023490784
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010545557955764234

Iteration 3:

isPrimeConventionalWayArr:  0.00010894328009858727
isPrimeSquarerootWayArr:  0.00012658657005652784
primeArr (suggested):  0.00005493023999705911
isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr:  0.00010782274951003491

JSFiddle Link as example:

https://jsfiddle.net/ganeshsurfs/y683v5s2/ Results I used to get for 10 Million iterations are as below:

Iteration 1:

"isPrimeConventionalWayArr: ", 0.0002012
"isPrimeSquarerootWayArr: ", 0.0002838
"primeArr (suggested): ", 0.0002132
"isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr: ", 0.0002189

Iteration 2:

"isPrimeConventionalWayArr: ", 0.0002242
"isPrimeSquarerootWayArr: ", 0.0002486
"primeArr (suggested): ", 0.000181
"isPrimeSquarerootWayTwoArr: ", 0.0002145
8
  • This is sluggish as hell for being a best solution. Counting primes between 1 and 300000 (there are 25997 of them) takes 150 times longer than the simple approach with sqrt(). 3000ms vs 20ms on my machine. Even using Number.isInteger(num/i) instead of num % i ===0 makes the sqrt() approach running for 30ms, which is still 100-times faster.
    – tevemadar
    Mar 11, 2022 at 11:47
  • @tevemadar Yes, true possible. Can you check the performance and put it here. I would also like to inform all the people using this. I saw more iterations even in Squareroot sqrt() way than the way mentioned by me. You can check the iteration differences. That it self solves most problems of performance and makes this faster than most solutions. Please recheck
    – Gary
    Mar 11, 2022 at 12:23
  • @tevemadar Check this out: print("Is Prime 30000239 : ", isPrimeConventionalWay(30000239)) ----- print("Is Prime 30000239 : ", isPrimeSquarerootWay(30000239)) ----- print("Is Prime 30000239 : ", prime(30000239)) ----- print("Is Prime 30000239 : ", isprimeAKSWay(30000239)) result is as follows
    – Gary
    Mar 11, 2022 at 12:35
  • @tevemadar count: Prime Conventional way 28 Is Prime 30000239 : False --- count: Prime Squareroot way 28 Is Prime 30000239 : False --- count: Prime Unconventional way 4 Is Prime 30000239 : False --- count: Prime AKS -Mersenne primes - Fermat's little theorem or whatever way 9 Is Prime 30000239: False
    – Gary
    Mar 11, 2022 at 12:36
  • Check the python code for the AKS implementation stackoverflow.com/a/71438297/3204942
    – Gary
    Mar 11, 2022 at 12:37
-4

Why are you trying to use loops!? Iterating is such a waste of computing power here. This can be done using math:

function isPrime(num) {
    if ( num !=1 && num%3 != 0 && num%5 != 0 && num%7 != 0 && num%9 != 0 && num%11 != 0 && Math.sign(num) == 1 && Math.round(num) == num) {

        if ( (num-1)%6 == 0 || (num+1)%6 == 0 ) {
            return true;
        }

    } // no need for else statement since if true, then will do return
    return num==11||x==9||num==5||num==3||num==2; // will return T/F;
}

#Steps:

  1. Check if the number is divisible by 5 (evenly)
  2. Check if the number is positive (negative numbers are not prime)
  3. Check if the number is a whole number (5.236 by rule not prime)
  4. Check if the number ± 1 is divisible by 6 (evenly)
    For more information check out 3Blue1Brown's Video
  5. Check if the number is 2, 3, 9 or 11 (outliers with the rule)
  6. Check if the number is 7 or 5 (due to attempt at false-positive reduction)

Always try to do the mathematical way, rather than iterating over loops. Math is almost always the most efficient way to do something. Yes, this equation might be confusing... However, we don't need much readability when it comes to checking if something is prime or not... It likely isn't going to need to be maintained by future code editors.

Optimized code version:

function isPrime(x=0) {
    const m = Math;
    return (x%3!=0&&x%5!=0&&x%7!=0&&x%9!=0&&x%11!=0&&x!=1&&m.sign(x)*m.round(x)==x&&(!!!((x-1)%6)||!!!((x+1)%6)))||x==11||x==9||x==7||x==5||x==3||x==2;
}

As it turns out, there's more to do with false-positive detection, because they're randomly distributed (at least seemingly) so the +-1 %6 stuff really isn't going to work for everything. But I'm definitely on to something here.

5
  • 1
    2 3 and 5 are prime numbers, but your function returns false.
    – Seblor
    Nov 23, 2019 at 18:36
  • 1
    @Seblor I've fixed that part for now... But as you can see in the second edit there are other issues that I ran into and don't really know how to solve without iteration... So I'm close, but no cigar... Anyway, hope this inspires someone savvier with math to come up with something incredible... But for now... This is just a dying prototype... LOL
    – 255.tar.xz
    Nov 23, 2019 at 19:37
  • 1
    There are infinitely many primes ... You can catch a load of non-primes with your code, but you're definitely going to need a loop for the big boys.
    – MrWatson
    Jan 30, 2020 at 13:25
  • People have been trying to find a formula for a long time: en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formula_for_primes. There’s not one that exists yet. Jan 30 at 13:18
  • Also, your second block tells me 9 is prime, and your first block tells me 7 is not prime and 9 is prime. I don't think that's "close." Jan 30 at 18:49
1
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