80

I'm trying to complete the Codewars challenge that asks you to check if a number is a prime number. For whatever reason, my solution doesn't seem to work for the square of odd prime numbers (e.g. 9 returns true instead of false).

function isPrime(num) {

  if (num === 2) {
    return true;
  } else if (num > 1) {
    for (var i = 2; i < num; i++) {

      if (num % i !== 0) {
        return true;
      } else if (num === i * i) {
        return false
      } else {
        return false;
      }
    }
  } else {
    return false;
  }

}

console.log(isPrime(121));

P.s. I included that second else/if statement because I was trying to solve the problem.

5
  • 8
    Possible duplicate of Prime Numbers JavaScript
    – nicovank
    Oct 23, 2016 at 6:12
  • your for loop will never iterate more than once. Oct 23, 2016 at 6:14
  • @ShashwatKumar please explain why and how to fix this Oct 29, 2016 at 21:41
  • This is very inefficient, don't use loops for something like this... Check my answer for the most CPU easy way to find a prime number... here
    – 255.tar.xz
    Nov 23, 2019 at 18:25
  • code stream used your code to promote their software.... i think thats funny
    – vik
    Jun 10, 2020 at 16:38

47 Answers 47

232

Time complexity: O(sqrt(n))

Space complexity: O(1)

const isPrime = num => {
    for(let i = 2, s = Math.sqrt(num); i <= s; i++)
        if(num % i === 0) return false; 
    return num > 1;
}
16
  • 4
    What the check for equality to 4 there is for? One may also only check the odd numbers.
    – zerkms
    Oct 23, 2016 at 8:33
  • 2
    so make it i <= s and remove that ugly hardcoded condition?
    – zerkms
    Oct 23, 2016 at 8:46
  • 4
    @Saka7 This was a really helpful answer, especially because of the sqrt optimization, which I hadn't considered. @zerkms Suggested only checking the odd numbers (greater than two of course), which is something I expected to see as well in an optimized solution. You can greatly optimize your solution this way. I've made this JSPerf test to demonstrate. Thanks, to both of you for the guidance BTW.
    – gfullam
    Jan 17, 2018 at 16:53
  • 2
    isPrime(0) returns true, which is not the case. For the function to be mathematically correct, you need to add another condition to the return statement: return num !== 1 && num !== 0;
    – pavloko
    May 22, 2018 at 16:28
  • 3
    Instead of return num !== 1 && num !== 0; you can just use condition return num >= 2; since prime numbers must be natural numbers greater than 1. Feb 13, 2019 at 19:59
31

A small suggestion here, why do you want to run the loop for whole n numbers?

If a number is prime it will have 2 factors (1 and number itself). If it's not a prime they will have 1, number itself and more, you need not run the loop till the number, may be you can consider running it till the square root of the number.

You can either do it by euler's prime logic. Check following snippet:

function isPrime(num) {
  var sqrtnum=Math.floor(Math.sqrt(num));
    var prime = num != 1;
    for(var i=2; i<sqrtnum+1; i++) { // sqrtnum+1
        if(num % i == 0) {
            prime = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    return prime;
}

Now the complexity is O(sqrt(n))

For more information Why do we check up to the square root of a prime number to determine if it is prime?

Hope it helps

16
function isPrime(num) { // returns boolean
  if (num <= 1) return false; // negatives
  if (num % 2 == 0 && num > 2) return false; // even numbers
  const s = Math.sqrt(num); // store the square to loop faster
  for(let i = 3; i <= s; i += 2) { // start from 3, stop at the square, increment in twos
      if(num % i === 0) return false; // modulo shows a divisor was found
  }
  return true;
}
console.log(isPrime(121));

Thanks to Zeph for fixing my mistakes.

2
  • 2
    Please add an explanation to your code. It helps people to understand the algorithm, so they can adapt it instead of just copying your code.
    – Mr. T
    Apr 15, 2018 at 16:39
  • 2
    Fails on 9, as sqrt(9) = 3, and your loop does not get called. try i <= s
    – ZephDavies
    Jul 10, 2019 at 18:17
11

Cool version:

const isPrime = n => ![...Array(n).keys()].slice(2).map(i => !(n%i)).includes(true) && ![0,1].includes(n)
2
  • What is ` && ![0,1].includes(number)` for ? If n = 1 or 0 it's the same result without this check - false Apr 1, 2019 at 7:50
  • 3
    Could you elaborate a little on this?
    – Vendetta
    May 4, 2021 at 5:00
9

Prime numbers are of the form 6f ± 1, excluding 2 and 3 where f is any integer

 function isPrime(number)
 { 
   if (number <= 1)
   return false;

   // The check for the number 2 and 3
   if (number <= 3)
   return true;

   if (number%2 == 0 || number%3 == 0)
   return false;

   for (var i=5; i*i<=number; i=i+6)
   {
      if (number%i == 0 || number%(i+2) == 0)
      return false;
   }

   return true;
 }

Time Complexity of the solution: O(sqrt(n))

0
7
function isPrimeNumber(n) {
  for (var i = 2; i < n; i++) { // i will always be less than the parameter so the condition below will never allow parameter to be divisible by itself ex. (7 % 7 = 0) which would return true
    if(n % i === 0) return false; // when parameter is divisible by i, it's not a prime number so return false
  }
  return n > 1; // otherwise it's a prime number so return true (it also must be greater than 1, reason for the n > 1 instead of true)
}

console.log(isPrimeNumber(1));  // returns false
console.log(isPrimeNumber(2));  // returns true
console.log(isPrimeNumber(9));  // returns false
console.log(isPrimeNumber(11)); // returns true
1
7

I would do it like this:

const isPrime = (num) => num < 10 ? [2, 3, 5, 7].includes(num) : ![2, 3, 5, 7].some(i => !(num % i));

UPDATE (thx to @lakscastro):

export const isPrime = n => n <= 1 ? false : !Array.from(new Array(n), (el, i) => i + 1)
  .filter(x => x > 1 && x < n)
  .find(x => n % x === 0);
2
  • your answer is not correct, this has too many false positive cases. We have 168 prime numbers up to 1000, your function says we have 231 (test it from 0 to 1000 and you'll got 231 numbers)
    – Alex Rintt
    Apr 13 at 23:48
  • @lakscastro, you are right! I have to update my code Apr 15 at 14:09
6

// A list prime numbers

function* Prime(number) { 
  const infinit = !number && number !== 0;
  const re = /^.?$|^(..+?)\1+$/;  
  let actual = 1;
 
  while (infinit || number-- ) {
      if(!re.test('1'.repeat(actual)) == true) yield actual;
      actual++
  };
};

let [...primers] = Prime(101); //Example
console.log(primers);

2
  • 4
    Very interesting solution, but I have no clue what is going on here (using a regex for generating a prime numbers sequence?) Can you give an explanation, please?
    – HynekS
    Nov 16, 2018 at 11:17
  • 1
    iluxonchik.github.io/…
    – ulou
    Apr 20, 2021 at 17:26
4

I think this question is lacking a recursive solution:

// Preliminary screen to save our beloved CPUs from unneccessary labour

const isPrime = n => {
  if (n === 2 || n === 3) return true;
  if (n < 2 || n % 2 === 0) return false;

  return isPrimeRecursive(n);
}

// The recursive function itself, tail-call optimized.
// Iterate only over odd divisors (there's no point to iterate over even ones).
 
const isPrimeRecursive = (n, i = 3, limit = Math.floor(Math.sqrt(n))) => {	
  if (n % i === 0) return false;
  if (i >= limit) return true; // Heureka, we have a prime here!
  return isPrimeRecursive(n, i += 2, limit);
}

// Usage example

for (i = 0; i <= 50; i++) {
  console.log(`${i} is ${isPrime(i) ? `a` : `not a` } prime`);
}

This approach have it's downside – since browser engines are (written 11/2018) still not TC optimized, you'd probably get a literal stack overflow error if testing primes in order of tens lower hundreds of millions or higher (may vary, depends on an actual browser and free memory).

0
3
function isPrime(num) {
    var prime = num != 1;
    for(var i=2; i<num; i++) {
        if(num % i == 0) {
            prime = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    return prime;
}

DEMO

3
3

very simple

const isPrime = num => {
  for (var i = 2; i < num; i++) if (num % i == 0) return false;
  return num >= 2; 
}
3

One of the shortest version

isPrime=(n)=>[...Array(n-2)].map((_,i)=>i+2).filter(i=>n%i==0).length==0
2
  • 2
    An even shorter one: isPrime=n=>!'1'.repeat(n).match(/^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$/)
    – J.Dario
    May 25, 2020 at 2:33
  • 1
    breaks for isPrime(1)
    – tsukimi
    Jul 22, 2020 at 1:25
2

you can use below code in javascript for checking number is prime or not. It will reduce no of iteration and get the result fast.

function testPrime(num) {
        var isPrime = true;
        if (num >= 2) {
            if(num == 2 || num == 3){
               isPrime = true;
            }
            else if (num % 2 == 0) {
                isPrime = false;
            }
            else {
                for (i = 3; i <= Math.floor(Math.sqrt(num)); i += 2) {
                    if (num % i == 0) {
                        isPrime = false;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        else {
            isPrime = false;
        }
        return isPrime;
    }

//testPrime(21) false

5
  • testPrime(2) === false
    – iOnline247
    Aug 31, 2017 at 1:23
  • Thanks iOnline247, for correcting me. Now i have updated my code. Sep 19, 2017 at 9:27
  • @RASHIDHAMID i am really curious why you are doing +2 instead of +1 but still got the same result. Jul 18, 2018 at 19:44
  • @RajkumarBansal I do +2 instead of +1 for improving the performance of loop. By +2 increment it will execute fast. Aug 27, 2018 at 11:42
  • @RASHIDHAMID got it! Sep 4, 2018 at 16:35
2

Since Node.js 16, this is built-in:

import {checkPrimeSync as isPrime} from 'node:crypto';

console.log(isPrime(13));
//=> true

Otherwise, @IhorSakaylyuk's answer can be improved further by skipping even numbers:

function isPrime(number) {
    if((number % 2 === 0 && number !== 2) || number <= 1) {
        return false;
    }

    const limit = Math.floor(Math.sqrt(number));

    for(let index = 3; index <= limit; index += 2) {
        if (number % index === 0) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

I also created a npm package with this function.

1

I think a better way to find a prime number is with this logic:

var p=prompt("input numeric value","10"); // input your number 
for(j=2;j<p;j++){ 
  if(isPrimes(j)){ 
    document.write(j+", "); // for output the value
  } // end if
}// end for loop
function isPrimes(n) {
  var primes = true;// let prime is true
  for (i=2;i<n;i++) {
    if(n%i==0) {
      primes= false; // return prime is false
      break; // break the loop
    }// end if inner 
  }// end inner loop
  return primes; // return the prime true or false
}// end the function

1

You can try this one

function isPrime(num){
   	
    // Less than or equal to 1 are not prime
    if (num<=1) return false;
    
    // 2 and 3 are prime, so no calculations
    if (num==2 || num==3 ) return true; 
    
    // If mod with square root is zero then its not prime 
    if (num % Math.sqrt(num)==0 ) return false;
    
    // Run loop till square root
    for(let i = 2, sqrt = Math.sqrt(num); i <= sqrt; i++) {
    
        // If mod is zero then its not prime
        if(num % i === 0) return false; 
    }
    
    // Otherwise the number is prime
    return true;
   }
   
   
   for(let i=-2; i <= 35; i++) { 
   	console.log(`${i} is${isPrime(i) ? '' : ' not'} prime`);
   }

1
function isPrime(num) { 
  return Array.from({ length: num }, (i, index) => index + 1).filter(
    (item, i) => (num % item) === 0).length === 2;
}

console.log(isPrime(1)); // false
console.log(isPrime(2)); // true
console.log(isPrime(3)); // true
console.log(isPrime(4)); // false
1

This answer is based on the answer by Ihor Sakaylyuk. But instead of checking for all numbers, I am checking only the odd numbers. Doing so I reduced the time complexity of the solution to O(sqrt(n)/2).

function isPrime(num) {
    if (num > 2 && num % 2 === 0) return false;
    for (var i = 3; i < Math.sqrt(num); i += 2) {
        if (num % i === 0) return false;
    }
    return num > 1;
}

1
  • 2
    You got a bug isPrime(9) is true. You should add = on the i < Math.sqrt(...)
    – Carson
    Sep 29, 2021 at 9:47
1
If x is not a prime, then we can find "a" and "b" such that
a**2 <= x <= b**2 , where a,b ∈ N+
=> a <= sqrt(x) <= b
So check until the sqrt(x) its upper bound is enough.

isPrime = x => {
    if (!Number.isInteger(x)) return false

    if (x > 2 && x % 2 ===0) return false 

    for (let divisor=3; divisor<=Math.sqrt(x); ++divisor) {
        if (x % divisor === 0) return false        
    }
    return x > 1
}

testData = [-1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4.1, 9, 11, "a"]
for (const data of testData) {
  console.log(`${data} is Prime? ${isPrime(data)}`)
}

1

The following implementation is faster than in all the previous answers, that's why I'm adding it.

The code below is from my prime library:

/**
 * Maximum prime number that can be generated in JavaScript,
 * using the standard 'number' type (53-bit of integer range).
 */
const maxPrime = 9_007_199_254_740_881;

const dividers = [
    0, 2, 6, 8, 12, 18, 20, 26, 30, 32, 36, 42, 48, 50, 56, 60, 62, 68, 72, 
    78, 86, 90, 92, 96, 98, 102, 110, 116, 120, 126, 128, 132, 138, 140, 146,
    152, 156, 158, 162, 168, 170, 176, 180, 182, 186, 188, 198, 200
];

function isPrime(x: number): boolean {
    if (isNaN(x) || x < 2 || x > maxPrime || x % 1) {
        return false;
    }
    if (x % 2 === 0) return x === 2;
    if (x % 3 === 0) return x === 3;
    if (x % 5 === 0) return x === 5;
    if (x % 7 === 0) return x === 7;
    const m = Math.sqrt(x);
    for (let i = 11; i <= m; i += 210) {
        for (const a of dividers) {
            if (x % (i + a) === 0) {
                return i + a === x;
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
}

On my machine, it can verify the first million numbers in 217ms.

1

Might be useful for some people: An implementation of the Miller Rabin primality test. Works for all positive integers less than Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER.

Try on JSFiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/4rxhas2o/


let unsafeToSquare = Math.floor(Math.sqrt(Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER))

function addMod(a, b, m) {
  // Returns (a + b) % m

  let sum = a + b

  let result = sum % m

  if (sum < Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER)
    return result

  let signature = ((a % 8) + (b % 8)) % 8

  let sumMod = sum % 8

  for (let i = -2; i <= 2; ++i) {
    if ((sumMod + i) % 8 === signature) {
      let ret = result + i

      if (ret > m)
        ret = (result - m) + i // prevent overflow

      return ret
    }
  }
}

function mulMod(a, b, m) {
  if (m === 0)
    return 0

  let prod = a * b

  if (prod < Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER)
    return prod % m

  let y = 0
  let result = a

  while (b > 1) {
    if (b % 2 === 0) {
      result = addMod(result, result, m)

      b /= 2
    } else {
      y = addMod(result, y, m)
      result = addMod(result, result, m)

      b = (b - 1) / 2
    }
  }

  return addMod(result, y, m)
}

function squareMod(b, m) {
  // Computes (b * b % m)

  return mulMod(b, b, m)
}

function expModLargeB(b, exponent, m) {
  let y = 1

  while (exponent > 1) {
    if (exponent % 2 === 0) {
      b = squareMod(b, m)

      exponent /= 2
    } else {
      y = mulMod(y, b, m)
      b = squareMod(b, m)

      exponent = (exponent - 1) / 2
    }
  }

  return mulMod(b, y, m)
}

function expMod(b, exponent, m) {
  if (exponent === 0)
    return 1

  if (b >= unsafeToSquare || m >= unsafeToSquare) {
    return expModLargeB(b, exponent, m)
  }

  let y = 1

  while (exponent > 1) {
    if (exponent % 2 === 0) {
      b *= b
      b %= m

      exponent /= 2
    } else {
      y *= b
      b *= b

      y %= m
      b %= m

      exponent = (exponent - 1) / 2
    }
  }

  return (b * y) % m
}

function _isProbablePrimeMillerRabin(p, base=2) {
  let pm1 = p - 1
  let pm1div = pm1
  let d, r = 0

  while (true) {
    if (pm1div % 2 === 0) {
      pm1div /= 2

      r++
    } else {
      d = pm1div
      break
    }
  }

  let x = expMod(base, d, p)

  if (x === 1 || x === pm1)
    return true

  for (let i = 0; i < r - 1; ++i) {
    x = squareMod(x, p)

    if (x === pm1)
      return true
  }

  return false
}

function _isPrimeLarge(p) {
  let bases

  if (p < 2047)
    bases = [2]
  else if (p < 1373653)
    bases = [2, 3]
  else if (p < 9080191)
    bases = [31, 73]
  else if (p < 25326001)
    bases = [2, 3, 5]
  else if (p < 3215031751)
    bases = [2, 3, 5, 7]
  else if (p < 4759123141)
    bases = [2, 7, 61]
  else if (p < 1122004669633)
    bases = [2, 13, 23, 1662803]
  else if (p < 2152302898747)
    bases = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11]
  else if (p < 3474749660383)
    bases = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13]
  else if (p < 341550071728321)
    bases = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17]
  else
    bases = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23]


  return bases.every(base => _isProbablePrimeMillerRabin(p, base))
}

let smallPrimes = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223]

function isPrime(p) {
  if (!Number.isInteger(p) || p < 2)
    return false

  // Test for small primes
  for (let i = 0; i < smallPrimes.length; ++i) {
    let prime = smallPrimes[i]

    if (p === prime)
      return true
    if (p % prime === 0)
      return false
  }

  if (p <= 49729) { // 223*223
    return true;
  }
  else {
    return _isPrimeLarge(p)
  }
}


const tests = [1, 2, 3, 10, 100, 100019, 10000000019, 100000000003, 10000000000037]
let start = performance.now()

tests.forEach(test => {
    console.log(`${test} is ${ isPrime(test) ? "" : "not " }prime`)
})

let end = performance.now()
console.log("Tests completed in " + (end - start) + " ms.")
1
  • You don't need the _isPrimeTrialDivision function, on numbers less than 150, with the test for small primes before you can tell that if the number is less than 49729 it is prime without having to do anything for (let i = 0; i < smallPrimes.length; ++i) { let prime = smallPrimes[i] if (p === prime) return true if (p % prime === 0) return false } if (p <= 49729) { // 223*223 return true; } else { return _isPrimeLarge(p) } May 12 at 1:41
0

You are trying to check too much conditions. just one loop is required to check for a prime no.

function isPrime(num){
if(num==2) 
return true;
for(i=2;i<Math.sqrt(num);i++) // mathematical property-no number has both of its factors greater than the square root 
{
if(num % i==0) 
return false; // otherwise it's a prime no.
}
return true;
}

You have to consider every no. a prime no. unless it is divisible by some no. less than or equal to the square root.

Your solution has got a return statement for every case,thus it stops execution before it should.It doesn't check any number more than once.It gives wrong answer for multiple cases-- 15,35.. in fact for every no. that is odd.

1
  • In your code you write i<Math.sqrt(num) which is wrong, should be <= (it's correct in your text though); also the first if statement is redundant
    – DonFuchs
    Apr 30, 2020 at 17:33
0

It looks like your first if statement within the first 'if' statement within the for loop. Since if num = 9 and i = 2, 9 % i !== 0 but 9 is not prime since on the next iteration where i = 3, 9 % i === 0.

Here would be my answer to that question.

var isPrime = function(n) {
  if(typeof n !== 'number' || n <= 1 || n % 1 !== 0){
    return false;
  }
  for(var i = 2; i <= Math.sqrt(n); i += 1){
    if(n % i === 0){
      return false;
    }
  }
  return true;
};

The first if statement catches the edge cases. The for loop then checks from 2 up to the square root of n because of the mathematical property where no number has both of its factors greater than the square root of that number.

Hope this helps!

0

This one is I think more efficient to check prime number :

function prime(num){
 if(num == 1) return true;
 var t = num / 2;
 var k = 2;
 while(k <= t) {
   if(num % k == 0) {
      return false
   } else {
   k++;  
  }
 }
  return true;
}
console.log(prime(37))
0

Simple version:

function isPrime(num) {
    if (num <= 1) { 
        return false;
    } else {
        for (var i = 2; i < num; i++) {
            if (num % i === 0) {
                return false; 
            }
        }
        return true;
    }  
}

console.log(isPrime(9));
2
  • it is totally wrong if you try with isPrime(9) return true and 9 is not prime! Oct 27, 2017 at 1:43
  • 1
    you are correct. I meant to place i and not 2 in the if statement num % i === 0 the way it was, it was only dividing by 2 and not by every single number up to the number being evaluated. I just wanted a very simple way for beginners to understand this algorithm I have edited it :)
    – Andy
    Oct 27, 2017 at 3:19
0

This is how I'd do it:

function isPrime(num) {
  if(num < 2) return false;
  if(num == 2) return true;
  for(var i = 2; i < num; i++) {
    if(num % i === 0) return false;
  }
  return true;
}
0
(function(value){
    var primeArray = [];
    for(var i = 2; i <= value; i++){ 
        if((i === 2) || (i === 3) || (i === 5) || (i === 7)){ 
            primeArray.push(i);
        }
          else if((i % 2 !== 0) && (i % 3 !== 0) && (i % 5 !== 0) && (i % 7 !== 0)){ 
              primeArray.push(i);
          }
        } 
       console.log(primeArray);
}(100));
1
  • 2
    Please explain your answers. As is, this is just a code dump Mar 27, 2018 at 18:10
0
function isAPrimeNumber(num){
     var counter = 0;
     //loop will go k equals to $num
     for (k = 1; k <= num; k++) {
      //check if the num is divisible by itself and 1
      // `%` modulus gives the reminder of the value, so if it gives the reminder `0` then it is divisible by the value
       if (num % k == 0) {
         //increment counter value 1
         counter  = counter  + 1;
        }
    }
   //if the value of the `counter is 2` then it is a `prime number`
  //A prime number is exactly divisible by 2 times only (itself and 1)
   if (counter == 2) {
     return num + ' is a Prime Number';
   }else{
    return num + ' is nota Prime Number';
   }
 }

Now call isAPrimeNumber() function by passing a value.

var resp = isAPrimeNumber(5);
console.log(resp);

Output:

5 is a Prime Number
0
function isPrime(num) {
        if(num < 2) return false;
        for (var i = 2; i <= num/2; i++) {
            if(num%i==0)
                return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

If we want the prime number between two number we have to add this code only

for(var i = 0; i < 100; i++){
        if(isPrime(i))
            console.log(i);
    }
0

Using Ticked solution Ihor Sakaylyuk

const isPrime = num => {
        for(let i = 2, s = Math.sqrt(num); i <= s; i++)
            if(num % i === 0) return false; 
        return num !== 1 && num !== 0;
}

Gives in console

isPrime( -100 ) true

const isPrime = num => {
  // if not is_number num return false

  if (num < 2) return false

  for(let i = 2, s = Math.sqrt(num); i <= s; i++) {
        if(num % i === 0) return false
  }

  return true
}

Gives in console

isPrime( 1 ) false

isPrime( 100 ) false

isPrime( -100 ) false

First 6 primes ? 2 3 5 7 11 13 ?

isPrime( 1 ) false

isPrime( 2 ) true // Prime 1

isPrime( 3 ) true // Prime 2

isPrime( 4 ) false

isPrime( 5 ) true // Prime 3

isPrime( 6 ) false

isPrime( 7 ) true // Prime 4

isPrime( 8 ) false

isPrime( 9 ) false

isPrime( 10 ) false

isPrime( 11 ) true // Prime 5

isPrime( 12 ) false

isPrime( 13 ) true // Prime 6

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