5

I'm writing webpage with a javascript to read data files in text format from the server per user request. Once the text file has been loaded, I need to manipulate the data somewhat.

I have been using XMLHttpRequest for the loading, however, now I see that synchronous requests are "deprecated". I can't start manipulating the data before it's loaded, so what can I do in this case?

1
  • 2
    Not use Synchronous but Asynchronous requests. :) – Jite Oct 23 '16 at 8:49
13

Use an asynchronous request (or fetch, see below, which is also asynchronous):

function doGET(path, callback) {
    var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xhr.onreadystatechange = function() {
        if (xhr.readyState == 4) {
            // The request is done; did it work?
            if (xhr.status == 200) {
                // ***Yes, use `xhr.responseText` here***
                callback(xhr.responseText);
            } else {
                // ***No, tell the callback the call failed***
                callback(null);
            }
        }
    };
    xhr.open("GET", path);
    xhr.send();
}

function handleFileData(fileData) {
    if (!fileData) {
        // Show error
        return;
    }
    // Use the file data
}

// Do the request
doGET("/path/to/file", handleFileData);

Or using promises, which are the more modern way to handle callbacks (but keep reading):

function doGET(path, callback) {
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
        xhr.onreadystatechange = function() {
            if (xhr.readyState == 4) {
                // The request is done; did it work?
                if (xhr.status == 200) {
                    // Yes, use `xhr.responseText` to resolve the promise
                    resolve(xhr.responseText);
                } else {
                    // No, reject the promise
                    reject(xhr);
                }
             }
        };
        xhr.open("GET", path);
        xhr.send();
    });
}

// Do the request
doGET("/path/to/file")
    .then(function(fileData) {
        // Use the file data
    })
    .catch(function(xhr) {
        // The call failed, look at `xhr` for details
    });

Here in 2019, there's no reason to use XHR wrapped in a promise like that, just use fetch:

function doGET(url) {
    return fetch(url).then(response => {
        if (!response.ok) {
            throw new Error("HTTP error " + response.status); // Rejects the promise
        }
    });
}
7
  • I'm not sure I understand this. I've tried using "return" to return the value from this function, but it always returns "undefined", because it isn't loaded yet. I've also tried setting a global variable equal to the result, but it is set to "undefined", because it isn't loaded yet. Should I put my entire application inside this function? – OZ1SEJ Oct 23 '16 at 8:58
  • My point is, it doesn't make any sense for the script to continue, until the result is in. I feel it is absolutely counter-intuitive that the synchronous call is now deprecated. – OZ1SEJ Oct 23 '16 at 9:00
  • @OZ1SEJ: Synchronous calls require blocking the JavaScript thread the call runs on. If that's the main UI thread (the default one), nothing else can happen on the page until the call completes. That locks up the UI of the page (at least) or the browser (in some cases). Asynchronous requests allow the page to remain responsive while the network operation is in progress. If you want to work with JavaScript on the browser, you need to embrace asynchronous operations. – T.J. Crowder Oct 23 '16 at 9:04
  • 2
    I do see the point now. I just had to get my around this. I took an hour's break to clean my bathroom, and then it hit me ;-) Thanks! – OZ1SEJ Oct 23 '16 at 21:07
  • These days most requests will likely be blocked. I used to be able to read in my pastebins, but now getting this error: "Access to XMLHttpRequest at 'pastebin.com/raw/<pastebin_hash>' from origin 'somesite.com' has been blocked by CORS policy: No 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header is present on the requested resource." – thdoan Jul 26 '20 at 1:44
3

Since you want to handle the local file, Try this

Make use of XMLHttpRequest

function readFile(file)
{
    var f = new XMLHttpRequest();
    f.open("GET", file, false);
    f.onreadystatechange = function ()
    {
        if(f.readyState === 4)
        {
            if(f.status === 200 || f.status == 0)
            {
                var res= f.responseText;
                alert(res);
            }
        }
    }
    f.send(null);
}

Then you have to call with File:\\

readFile('File:\\\yourpath');
4
  • 1
    Yes, I can alert the result inside the function, but either I need to get the result out of the function somehow, or I need to put my entire application inside that innermost if-statement...? – OZ1SEJ Oct 23 '16 at 9:04
  • 2
    @OZ1SEJ: Just put your code that handles the file data in a function that accepts an argument, and have the asynchronous code call that function when the data is ready. I've updated the CW answer to show doing that. – T.J. Crowder Oct 23 '16 at 9:05
  • @T.J.Crowder So, basically, I should call my entire application from within this function? Also, what do you mean by "CW answer"? – OZ1SEJ Oct 23 '16 at 9:12
  • @OZ1SEJ: You should have that function be the starting point of processing the file. It can (and should) call other functions, of course. "CW" means "community wiki," I was referring to this answer. – T.J. Crowder Oct 23 '16 at 9:13

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