-1
class Processer
{
    private function processChat() { }
    private function processUsers() { }
    private function processBuys() { }
    private function processOrders() { }
}

I normally would use this:

public function do()
{
    $this->processChat();
    $this->processUsers();
    $this->processOrders();
}

but its easy to forget to call the new function (as I intentionally missed the processBuys() method).

If I refactor it like that:

public function do()
{
    foreach (get_class_methods($this) as $m)
    {
        if (substr($m, 0,7) == 'process')
        {
            $this->$m();
        }
    }
}

it works but seems to be ugly (not doable in Java, for example)

  • 1
    That could be done in Java as well, though it probably wouldn't make a good solution. Ultimately you're trying to find a functional programming solution, which Java wasn't designed for (prior to Java 8, anyway). As is, this question is opinion-based though (and therefore off-topic), so I'd refactor it to elicit more fact-based answers. – nbrooks Oct 23 '16 at 9:41
  • 1
    This is do-able in java using reflection. If you are not writing a framework or a common code, I would not suggest doing it. The order of methods executed would not be programmed may cause issues. – sashwat Oct 23 '16 at 9:45
  • 1
    is the question about implementing the same in java ? – Akash Yadav Oct 23 '16 at 10:08
  • not, Im php expert and very beginner in Java. I just brought an example, because I thought its not doable in Java (it turned out it can, but by the same disgusting way :) – John Smith Oct 23 '16 at 10:16
  • 1
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's better suited to codereview.stackexchange.com (where it will get a drubbing). – ceejayoz Oct 23 '16 at 22:18
4

That's definitely an ugly solution. Call the methods explicitly or refactor your code.

easy to forget to call the new function

I disagree. Noone should be expecting that a newly added method will get automagically called by default. Also, if someone is modifying existing code without understanding how it works first, this will not be the only thing that they might get wrong.


Regarding your design choices - why is a single class handling both "chat" and "orders"? I suggest moving the logic to separate classes:

(This is just an example how it can be implemented without resorting to magic.)

interface Process
{
    function execute();
}

class Processor
{
    private $processes;

    function addProcess(Process $process)
    {
        $this->processes[] = $process;
    }

    function process()
    {
        foreach ($this->processes as $process) {
            $process->execute();
        }
    }
}

class ChatProcess implements Process { function execute() { echo "Executing chat\n"; } }
class UsersProcess implements Process { function execute() { echo "Executing users\n"; } }
class PurchasesProcess implements Process { function execute() { echo "Executing purchases\n"; } }
class OrdersProcess implements Process { function execute() { echo "Executing orders\n"; } }

// test
$processor = new Processor();

$processor->addProcess(new ChatProcess());
$processor->addProcess(new UsersProcess());
$processor->addProcess(new PurchasesProcess());
$processor->addProcess(new OrdersProcess());

$processor->process();

Output:

Executing chat
Executing users
Executing purchases
Executing orders
  • yea, seems to be cool - appart from the fact that it increases the complexity and need more classes – John Smith Oct 23 '16 at 10:02

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