I'm looking for a really quick, clean and efficient way to get the max "y" value in the following JSON slice:

[{"x":"8/11/2009","y":0.026572007},{"x":"8/12/2009","y":0.025057454},{"x":"8/13/2009","y":0.024530916},{"x":"8/14/2009","y":0.031004457}]

Is a for-loop the only way to go about it? I'm keen on somehow using Math.max.

12 Answers 12

up vote 468 down vote accepted

To find the maximum y value of the objects in array:

Math.max.apply(Math, array.map(function(o) { return o.y; }))
  • 31
    Could you expand this answer to show how to return the object that the max value was found in? That would be very helpful, thanks! – Mike Lyons Sep 12 '14 at 21:27
  • 17
    Here is the fiddle! hope this will help to someone jsfiddle.net/45c5r246 – mili May 20 '15 at 11:27
  • 18
    @MikeLyons if you still care about getting the actual object: jsfiddle.net/45c5r246/34 – tobyodavies Jul 3 '15 at 0:45
  • 7
    Please expain your answer! – John William Domingo Aug 12 '16 at 23:35
  • 10
    FWIW my understanding is when you call apply on a function it executes the function with a specified value for this and a series of arguments specified as an array. The trick is that apply turns the array into a series of actual function arguments. So in this case it finally calls Math.max(0.0265, 0.0250, 0.024, 0.031) with the this of the function executed being Math. I can't see why it should be Math frankly, I don't think the function requires a valid this. Oh and here is a proper explanation: stackoverflow.com/questions/21255138/… – Daniel C Aug 18 '16 at 14:12

Find the object whose property "X" has the greatest value in an array of objects

One way would be to use Array reduce..

const max = data.reduce(function(prev, current) {
    return (prev.y > current.y) ? prev : current
}) //returns object

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/Reduce http://caniuse.com/#search=reduce (IE9 and above)

If you don't need to support IE (only Edge), or can use a pre-compiler such as Babel you could use the more terse syntax.

const max = data.reduce((prev, current) => (prev.y > current.y) ? prev : current)
  • 3
    This is a good answer, however, you would like to pass an initial value or you would get an error in case the data array is empty. i.e. for an autoincrement index of objects. const max = data.reduce((prev, current) => (prev.y > current.y) ? prev : current, 1) – juliangonzalez May 25 '17 at 15:56
  • You raise a good point, I would probably choose null over 1. – Andy Polhill May 30 '17 at 10:26
  • 8
    Note that this returns the object that had the max value not the max value from the object. This may or may not be what you want. In my case it was what I wanted. +1 – John Nov 24 '17 at 23:46
  • Good complementary answer ! – Legends Jun 28 at 20:33
  • x or y? pick one lol – quemeful Nov 5 at 18:35

clean and simple ES6 (Babel)

const maxValueOfY = Math.max(...arrayToSearchIn.map(o => o.y), 0);

The second parameter should ensure a default value if arrayToSearchIn is empty.

  • 8
    also it's good to know that it returns -Infinity (a truthy value) for an empty array – icl7126 Nov 6 '16 at 13:08
  • 1
    This is supported in most modern browsers without Babel now. – Eugene Kulabuhov Feb 23 '17 at 20:24
  • 14
    as it returns -Infinity for an empty array, you can pass an initial value Math.max(...state.allProjects.map(o => o.id), 1); – juliangonzalez May 25 '17 at 15:57
  • 5
    This should be the accepted answer now... definitely the more terse approach. – nickb Mar 16 at 4:26
  • to handle case for minus values change 0 to arrayToSearchIn[0].y. Time complexity comparision: stackoverflow.com/a/53654364/860099 – Kamil Kiełczewski Dec 7 at 11:38

Well, first you should parse the JSON string, so that you can easily access it's members:

var arr = $.parseJSON(str);

Use the map method to extract the values:

arr = $.map(arr, function(o){ return o.y; });

Then you can use the array in the max method:

var highest = Math.max.apply(this,arr);

Or as a one-liner:

var highest = Math.max.apply(this,$.map($.parseJSON(str), function(o){ return o.y; }));
  • 9
    It's not tagged with jQuery – Robin van Baalen Aug 25 '14 at 16:09
  • 1
    @RobinvanBaalen: Yes, you are right. It is however tagged with JSON but the accepted answer ignores that, and tobyodavies also removed that from the subject of the question... Perhaps I should add jquery to the question... ;) – Guffa Aug 25 '14 at 17:54
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    It doesn't matter much if @tobyodavies ignored the fact that it was tagged json -- he isn't using an external javascript library in his answer :) – Robin van Baalen Aug 25 '14 at 18:33

I'd like to explain the terse accepted answer step-by-step:

var objects = [{ x: 3 }, { x: 1 }, { x: 2 }];

// array.map lets you extract an array of attribute values
var xValues = objects.map(function(o) { return o.x; });
// es6
xValues = Array.from(objects, o => o.x);

// function.apply lets you expand an array argument as individual arguments
// So the following is equivalent to Math.max(3, 1, 2)
// The first argument is "this" but since Math.max doesn't need it, null is fine
var xMax = Math.max.apply(null, xValues);
// es6
xMax = Math.max(...xValues);

// Finally, to find the object that has the maximum x value (note that result is array):
var maxXObjects = objects.filter(function(o) { return o.x === xMax; });

// Altogether
xMax = Math.max.apply(null, objects.map(function(o) { return o.x; }));
var maxXObject = objects.filter(function(o) { return o.x === xMax; })[0];
// es6
xMax = Math.max(...Array.from(objects, o => o.x));
maxXObject = objects.find(o => o.x === xMax);


document.write('<p>objects: ' + JSON.stringify(objects) + '</p>');
document.write('<p>xValues: ' + JSON.stringify(xValues) + '</p>');
document.write('<p>xMax: ' + JSON.stringify(xMax) + '</p>');
document.write('<p>maxXObjects: ' + JSON.stringify(maxXObjects) + '</p>');
document.write('<p>maxXObject: ' + JSON.stringify(maxXObject) + '</p>');

Further information:

  • Great explanation! It might be a bit easier to read if it wasn't in code comments, but still - great work – Martin Jan 18 '17 at 22:01

if you (or, someone here) are free to use lodash utility library, it has a maxBy function which would be very handy in your case.

hence you can use as such:

_.maxBy(jsonSlice, 'y');
var data = [
  { 'name': 'Vins', 'age': 27 },
  { 'name': 'Jan', 'age': 38 },
  { 'name': 'Alex', 'age': 80 },
  { 'name': 'Carl', 'age': 25 },
  { 'name': 'Digi', 'age': 40 }
];
var max = data.reduce(function (prev, current) {
   return (prev.age > current.age) ? prev : current
});
//output = {'name': 'Alex', 'age': 80}
  • 1
    Could you please add some code explanation? – Andrei Suvorkov Jun 8 at 6:51

Or a simple sort! Keeping it real :)

array.sort((a,b)=>a.y<b.y)[0].y

ES6 solution

Math.max(...array.map(function(o){return o.y;}))

For more details see https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Math/max

  • 3
    This has already been answered and is a duplicate – Martin Dawson Jan 4 at 0:47
var max = 0;                
jQuery.map(arr, function (obj) {
  if (obj.attr > max)
    max = obj.attr;
});

Each array and get max value with Math.

data.reduce((max, b) => Math.max(max, b.costo), data[0].costo);

Comparison of tree ONELINERS which handle minus numbers case (input in a array):

var maxA = Math.max(...a.map(o=>o.y),a[0].y); // 33chars time complexity: >O(2n)

var maxB = a.reduce((a,b)=>a.y>b.y?a:b).y;    // 30chars time complexity:  O(n)

var maxC = a.sort((a,b)=>b.y-a.y)[0].y;       // 27chars time complexity:  O(nlogn)

editable example here. Ideas from: maxA, maxB, maxC (side effect: changed a - sort is inplace).

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