Given the following associations, I need to reference the Question that a Choice is attached through from the Choice model. I have been attempting to use belongs_to :question, through: :answer to perform this action.

class User
  has_many :questions
  has_many :choices
end

class Question
  belongs_to :user
  has_many :answers
  has_one :choice, :through => :answer
end

class Answer
  belongs_to :question
end

class Choice
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :answer
  belongs_to :question, :through => :answer

  validates_uniqueness_of :answer_id, :scope => [ :question_id, :user_id ]
end

I am getting

NameError uninitialized constant User::Choice

when I try to do current_user.choices

It works fine, if I don't include the

belongs_to :question, :through => :answer

But I want to use that because I want to be able to do the validates_uniqueness_of

I am probably overlooking something simple. Any help would be appreciated.

  • 1
    Maybe it's worth changing the accepted answer to the delegate one? – 23inhouse Jun 7 '16 at 9:11
up vote 50 down vote accepted

A belongs_to association cannot have a :through option. You're better off caching the question_id on Choice and adding a unique index to the table (especially because validates_uniqueness_of is prone to race conditions).

If you're paranoid, add a custom validation to Choice that confirms that the answer's question_id matches, but it sounds like the end user should never be given the opportunity to submit data that would create this kind of mismatch.

  • Thanks Stephen, I really didn't want to have to associate directly with question_id, but I guess its the easiest way. My original thought was, since "answer" belongs to "question", I can always go through "answer" to get to the "question". But do you think thats not easy to do, or do you think thats just a bad schema? – vinhboy Oct 27 '10 at 15:57
  • If you want a unique constraint/validations, the scoped fields must exist in the same table. Remember, there are race conditions. – stephencelis Oct 27 '10 at 16:12
  • >> it sounds like the end user should never be given the opportunity to submit data that would create this kind of mismatch. -- You never can guarantee that the user "does not have an opportunity to do something" unless you do an explicit server-side check for that. – Konstantin Mar 14 at 23:28

You can also delegate:

class Company < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :employees
  has_many :dogs, :through => :employees
end

class Employee < ActiveRescord::Base
  belongs_to :company
  has_many :dogs
end

class Dog < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :employee

  delegate :company, :to => :employee, :allow_nil => true
end
  • 14
    +1, this is the cleanest way to do this. (at least that i can think) – Orlando Sep 6 '12 at 18:50
  • 5
  • 7
    Is there a way to do this with JOIN so that it doesn't use so many queries? – Tallboy Oct 4 '13 at 1:44
  • 1
    I'd like to know myself. Everything I tried fired 3 selects. You can specify a "-> { joins :something }" lambda on an association. The join is fired but subsequently another select anyway. I wasn't able to tune this up. – Renra Oct 21 '13 at 8:25
  • 2
    @Tallboy A few perfectly indexed select queries on primary keys are almost always better than any single JOIN query. Joins make the database work hard. – Ryan McGeary Aug 26 '14 at 17:18

Just use has_one instead of belongs_to in your :though, like this:

class Choice
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :answer
  has_one :question, :through => :answer
end

Unrelated, but I'd be hesitant to use validates_uniqueness_of instead of using a proper unique constraint in your database. When you do this in ruby you have race conditions.

  • 30
    Big warning with this solution. Whenever you save Choice it will always save Question unless autosave: false is set. – Chris Nicola Aug 20 '14 at 18:45
  • @ChrisNicola can you please explain what you meant, I didn't understand what you meant. – aks Jan 19 at 12:09
  • What I meant where? If you mean a proper unique constraint, I mean adding a UNIQUE index to the column/field that must be unique in the database. – Chris Nicola Jan 24 at 19:49

You could simply use has_one in place of belongs_to :

has_one :question, :through => :answer
  • 11
    This answer seems very similar to stackoverflow.com/a/15649020/38765 – Andrew Grimm Aug 10 '15 at 6:06
  • Agreed with @AndrewGrimm. This answer is identical to the one from mrm, except it's a year and half later. – jeffdill2 Sep 27 '16 at 16:01
  • 2
    mmmmmmmmmmrmrmrmrmmr how suspicious – zeion Mar 8 '17 at 17:58

My approach was to make a virtual attribute instead of adding database columns.

class Choice
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :answer

  # ------- Helpers -------
  def question
    answer.question
  end

  # extra sugar
  def question_id
    answer.question_id
  end
end

This approach is pretty simple, but comes with tradeoffs. It requires Rails to load answer from the db, and then question. This can be optimized later by eager loading the associations you need (i.e. c = Choice.first(include: {answer: :question})), however, if this optimization is necessary, then stephencelis' answer is probably a better performance decision.

There's a time and place for certain choices, and I think this choice is better when prototyping. I wouldn't use it for production code unless I knew it was for an infrequent use case.

It sounds like what you want is a User who has many Questions.
The Question has many Answers, one of which is the User's Choice.

Is this what you are after?

I would model something like that along these lines:

class User
  has_many :questions
end

class Question
  belongs_to :user
  has_many   :answers
  has_one    :choice, :class_name => "Answer"

  validates_inclusion_of :choice, :in => lambda { answers }
end

class Answer
  belongs_to :question
end

So you cant have the behavior that you want but you can do something that feels like it. You want to be able to do Choice.first.question

what I have done in the past is something like this

class Choice
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :answer
  validates_uniqueness_of :answer_id, :scope => [ :question_id, :user_id ]
  ...
  def question
    answer.question
  end
end

this way the you can now call question on Choice

The has_many :choices creates an association named choices, not choice. Try using current_user.choices instead.

See the ActiveRecord::Associations documentation for information about about the has_many magic.

  • 1
    Thanks for your help Michael, however, thats a typo on my part. I am already doing current_user.choices. This error has something to do with me wanting to assign belongs_to to user and question. – vinhboy Oct 27 '10 at 15:01

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