3

I'm writing a program that listens to clipboard changes and print that changes to stdout (it's just a test for a bigger program). The problem is: when the main thread finishes, the JVM exits and no events arrive to the listener. How can I do to keep JVM running while listening the clipboard?

My code looks like this:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Clipboard cb = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getSystemClipboard();

        cb.addFlavorListener(new FlavorListener() {
            @Override
            public void flavorsChanged(FlavorEvent e) {
                System.out.println(e);
            }
        });

    } 

}

Thanks!

5
  • 1
    Ever heard of Threading? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thread_(computing) – Olayinka Oct 24 '16 at 8:43
  • 1
    @Olayinka what is the connection to OP's question? I would assume that the Clipboard handles its listeners and therefore threading should not be the issue here. – Turing85 Oct 24 '16 at 8:45
  • @Turing85 I guess you're right. I'm pretty sure if the OP understands the concept of threading, he would know why the process exits and didn't stay alive as he wanted. – Olayinka Oct 24 '16 at 8:48
  • @Olayinka I think he understands it but he is looking for a way of keeping the thread alive in a proper manner – Rubasace Oct 24 '16 at 8:53
  • @Olayinka I just asked what the connection to the question is. I understand what you mean, but is it not obvious (especially not to a person who does not understand threading). And linking some arbitrary wikipedia page does not help either since it does not explain the problem at hand (the JVM shutting down when the main thread ends). – Turing85 Oct 24 '16 at 8:54
3

How can I do to keep JVM running while listening the clipboard?

I can't see how you would tell the program to stop listening to the clipboard in a proper way.

What I would do is just print some kind of message using standard out indicating a key to exit the program and then calling a scanner or similiar for checking the input. This way you achieve 2 important points:

  1. The thread doesn't die inmediately as the scanner does the "wait" part I think you are looking for.
  2. Users get control over the thread's lifecycle, so they can terminate it whenever they want in a proper way
3

I would just let the main-Thread sleep:

import java.awt.Toolkit;
import java.awt.datatransfer.Clipboard;
import java.awt.datatransfer.FlavorEvent;
import java.awt.datatransfer.FlavorListener;

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {

        Clipboard cb = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getSystemClipboard();

        cb.addFlavorListener(new FlavorListener() {
            @Override
            public void flavorsChanged(FlavorEvent e) {
                System.out.println(e);
            }
        });

        // sleep forever
        Object o = new Object();
        synchronized (o) {
            o.wait();
        }
    } 
}

It is important to keep at least one (non-deamon) thread alive, to keep your application running. An alive thread could be:

  1. The main thread, put to sleep
  2. A new thread, put to sleep
  3. Any awt/swing application thread, that will usualy stay alive, as long as there is at least one element undisposed
  4. Any other thread, listening to any interface (waiting for System.in, HTTP-Request, or just anything)

Concerning the sleep mechanism, here are my three different techiques:

  1. Never do this, it will keep your CPU busy:

    for(;;);
    
  2. This code's intention is clearly visible:

    for(;;) Thread.sleep(Long.MAX_VALUE);
    
  3. More elegant:

    Object o = new Object();
    synchronized (o) {o.wait();}
    

See How do you hang a thread in Java in one line? for a discussion about sleeping.

4
  • When talking about "any" thread, it's important to bear in mind the difference between daemon and non-daemon threads. – biziclop Oct 24 '16 at 9:05
  • and you could let the thread "sleep" by calling .wait() on some object (e.g. Test itself). – Turing85 Oct 24 '16 at 9:06
  • @biziclop you are absolutely right about deamon threads - I updated my answer. Thanks! – slartidan Oct 24 '16 at 11:06
  • @Turing85 I updated my answer to include a discussion about sleeping algorithms. Thanks for mentioning .wait()! – slartidan Oct 24 '16 at 11:20
0

Try this:

public static void listen() throws InterruptedException {
    Thread t = new Thread (new Runnable(){

        @Override
        public void run() {
            Clipboard cb = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getSystemClipboard();
            Transferable contents = cb.getContents(null);
            cb.addFlavorListener(new FlavorListener() {
                @Override
                public void flavorsChanged(FlavorEvent e) {
                    try {
                        System.out.println("Got Data:"+(String)contents.getTransferData(DataFlavor.stringFlavor));
                    } catch (UnsupportedFlavorException | IOException e1) {
                        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                        e1.printStackTrace();
                    }
                }
            });
        }
    });
    t.setDaemon(true);
    t.start();

    while (true)
        Thread.sleep(Long.MAX_VALUE);
}

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