18

I develop a simple web app and, in the future, I want to do it as multi-tenancy.

So I want to write the connection string straight into OnConfiguring method:

public class ApplicationContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }

    protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
    {
        optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer("connection string from appsettings.json");
        base.OnConfiguring(optionsBuilder);
    }
}

Startup class:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddDbContext<ApplicationContext>();
    services.AddMvc();
}

How can I extract connection string from appsettings.json into ApplicationContext class?

I wouldn't like to create any constructors for ApplicationContext class.

  • You need to pass the connection string as parameter to AddDbContext IIRC – SO used to be good Oct 24 '16 at 12:56
  • Why do you want to register it the OnConfiguring method rather than within services.AddDbContext<ApplicationContext>(options => options.UseSqlServer("..."))? – Tseng Oct 24 '16 at 12:58
  • @Tseng I need to change dynamically connection strings in future for multi-tenancy. – A. Gladkiy Oct 24 '16 at 13:00
  • @A.Gladkiy Are you going to dynamically change the connection string of an in-use context? Sounds like a bad idea. Why not just register the context multiple times? – SO used to be good Oct 24 '16 at 13:01
  • @CamiloTerevinto I want to create db each time after user was registered. What do you mean by register context multiple times? – A. Gladkiy Oct 24 '16 at 13:09
5

So I want to write the connection string straight into OnConfiguring method:

How can I extract connection string from appsettings.json into ApplicationContext class?

I wouldn't like to create any constructors for ApplicationContext class.

You could use Options Pattern via IOptions but the easiest way is using DI in ApplicationContext constructor ;)

Follow below articles, please:

16

Let's imagine that you have .NET Core application and your appsettings.json file looks like this:

{
  "Logging": {
    "IncludeScopes": false,
    "LogLevel": {
      "Default": "Debug",
      "System": "Information",
      "Microsoft": "Information"
    }
  },
  "Production": {
    "SqliteConnectionString": "Filename=./MyDatabase.sqlite"
  }
}

You can get SqliteConnectionString value from Startup.cs like this:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    var connection = Configuration["Production:SqliteConnectionString"];

    services.AddDbContext<MyContext>(options =>
        options.UseSqlite(connection)
    );
    ....
 }

And then in your DBContext you should add constructor that accepts DbContextOptions:

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public MyContext (DbContextOptions<MyContext> options) : base(options)
    { }

    ...
}
  • It's good. But how can I get the same string into ApplicationContext class? I can't do it as you wrote. – A. Gladkiy Oct 24 '16 at 13:42
  • 3
    And what if I want to use parameterless constructor for MyContext? – A. Gladkiy Oct 24 '16 at 13:56
3

.NET Core 2.0

Add this class:

// Requires NuGet package Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json

using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using System.IO;

namespace RutarBackgroundServices.AppsettingsJson
{
    public static class AppSettingsJson
    {
        public static string ApplicationExeDirectory()
        {
            var location = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location;
            var appRoot = Path.GetDirectoryName(location);

            return appRoot;
        }

        public static IConfigurationRoot GetAppSettings()
        {
            string applicationExeDirectory = ApplicationExeDirectory();

            var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(applicationExeDirectory)
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json");

            return builder.Build();
        }


    }
}

Get the value for the key "MssqlConnectionString" from the "appsettings.json" file:

var appSettingsJson = AppSettingsJson.GetAppSettings();
var connectionString = appSettingsJson["MssqlConnectionString"];

Create the file "appsettings.json" in the root directory of your project:

{
  "MssqlConnectionString": "Server=yourip; Database=yourdbname; User Id=yourusername; Password=yourpassword; Pooling=true;",
  "Db2ConnectionString": "Database=yourdbname;UserID=yourusername;Password=yourpassword;Server=yourip:yourport",
  "SomeOtherKey": "SomeOtherValue"
}
  • 2
    I used this for this same issue in a .NET Core 2 app and it's perfect. Highly recommend. – Matt Feb 28 '18 at 16:06
  • 1
    Better to use the "ConnectionStrings" section as in: { "ConnectionStrings": { "MssqlConnectionString": "Server=yourip; Database=yourdbname; User Id=yourusername; Password=yourpassword; Pooling=true;", "Db2ConnectionString": "Database=yourdbname;UserID=yourusername;Password=yourpassword;Server=yourip:yourport", }, "SomeOtherKey": "SomeOtherValue"} – Daniel Corbett Jun 20 at 14:36
0

You can use the factory pattern to resolve your DbContext.

public interface ITenantDbContextFactory
{
    ApplicationContext Create(string tenantId);
}

public class TenantDbContextFactory()
{
    private ApplicationContext context;

    public TenantDbContextFactory()
    {
    }

    public ApplicationContext Create(string tenantId) 
    {
        if(this.context==null) 
        {
            var connectionString = GetConnectionForTenant(tenantId);
            var dbContextBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder();
            dbContextBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionString);

            this.context = new ApplicationContext(dbContextBuilder);
        }

        return this.context;
    }
}

In Startup:

services.AddDbContext<ApplicationContext>();
services.AddScoped<ITenantDbContextFactory, TenantDbContextFactory>();

Your service or controller:

public class HomeController 
{
    private readonly ITenantDbContextFactory dbFactory;
    public HomeControler(ITenantDbContextFactory tenantDbContextFactory)
    {
        this.dbFactory = tenantDbContextFactory;
    }

    public void Action()
    {
        var dbContext = this.dbFactory.Create("tenantA");
        // use your context here
        dbContext...
    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.