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After trying suggestions posted in other places, I find myself unable to get a typescript project running that uses an untyped NPM module. Below is a minimal example and the steps that I tried.

For this minimal example, we will pretend that lodash does not have existing type definitions. As such, we will ignore the package @types/lodash and try to manually add its typings file lodash.d.ts to our project.

Folder structure

  • node_modules
    • lodash
  • src
    • foo.ts
  • typings
    • custom
      • lodash.d.ts
    • global
    • index.d.ts
  • package.json
  • tsconfig.json
  • typings.json

Next, the files.

File foo.ts

///<reference path="../typings/custom/lodash.d.ts" />
import * as lodash from 'lodash';

console.log('Weeee');

File lodash.d.ts is copied directly from the original @types/lodash package.

File index.d.ts

/// <reference path="custom/lodash.d.ts" />
/// <reference path="globals/lodash/index.d.ts" />

File package.json

{
  "name": "ts",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "",
  "main": "index.js",
  "typings": "./typings/index.d.ts",
  "dependencies": {
    "lodash": "^4.16.4"
  },
  "author": "",
  "license": "ISC"
}

File tsconfig.json

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "target": "ES6",
    "jsx": "react",
    "module": "commonjs",
    "sourceMap": true,
    "noImplicitAny": true,
    "experimentalDecorators": true,
    "typeRoots" : ["./typings"],
    "types": ["lodash"]
  },
  "include": [
    "typings/**/*",
    "src/**/*"
  ],
  "exclude": [
    "node_modules",
    "**/*.spec.ts"
  ]
}

File typings.json

{
    "name": "TestName",
    "version": false,
    "globalDependencies": {
        "lodash": "file:typings/custom/lodash.d.ts"
    }
}

As you can see, I have tried many different ways of importing typings:

  1. By directly importing it in foo.ts
  2. By a typings property in package.json
  3. By using typeRoots in tsconfig.json with a file typings/index.d.ts
  4. By using an explicit types in tsconfig.json
  5. By including the types directory in tsconfig.json
  6. By making a custom typings.json file and running typings install

Yet, when I run Typescript:

E:\temp\ts>tsc
error TS2688: Cannot find type definition file for 'lodash'.

What am I doing wrong?

  • Did you try including it in foo.ts using correct path like ///<reference path="../typings/custom/lodash.d.ts" /> ? – artem Oct 24 '16 at 19:52
  • @artem That was a typo, thank you. It did not change the result. – Jodiug Oct 25 '16 at 7:14
168
+50

Unfortunately these things are not currently very well documented, but even if you were able to get it working, let's go over your configuration so that you understand what each part is doing and how it relates to how typescript processes and loads typings.

First let's go over the error you are receiving:

error TS2688: Cannot find type definition file for 'lodash'.

This error is actually not coming from your imports or references or your attempt to use lodash anywhere in your ts files. Rather it is coming from a misunderstanding of how to use the typeRoots and types properties, so let's go into a little more detail on those.

The thing about typeRoots:[] and types:[] properties is that they are NOT general-purpose ways to load arbitrary declaration (*.d.ts) files.

These two properties are directly related to the new TS 2.0 feature which allows packaging and loading typing declarations from NPM packages.

This is very important to understand, that these work only with folders in NPM format (i.e. a folder containing a package.json or index.d.ts).

The default for typeRoots is:

{
   "typeRoots" : ["node_modules/@types"]
}

By default this means that typescript will go into the node_modules/@types folder and try to load every sub-folder it finds there as a npm package.

It is important to understand that this will fail if a folder does not have an npm package-like structure.

This is what is happening in your case, and the source of your initial error.

You have switched typeRoot to be:

{
    "typeRoots" : ["./typings"]
}

This means that typescript will now scan the ./typings folder for subfolders and try to load each subfolder it finds as an npm module.

So let's pretend you just had typeRoots setup to point to ./typings but did not yet have any types:[] property setup. You would likely see these errors:

error TS2688: Cannot find type definition file for 'custom'.
error TS2688: Cannot find type definition file for 'global'.

This is because tsc is scanning your ./typings folder and finding the sub-folders custom and global. It then is trying to interpret these as npm package-type typing, but there is no index.d.ts or package.json in these folders and so you get the error.

Now let's talk a bit about the types: ['lodash'] property you are setting. What does this do? By default, typescript will load all sub-folders it finds within your typeRoots. If you specify a types: property it will only load those specific sub-folders.

In your case you are telling it to load the ./typings/lodash folder but it doesn't exist. This is why you get:

error TS2688: Cannot find type definition file for 'lodash'

So let's summarize what we've learned. Typescript 2.0 introduced typeRoots and types for loading declaration files packaged in npm packages. If you have custom typings or single loose d.ts files that are not contained withing a folder following npm package conventions, then these two new properties are not what you want to use. Typescript 2.0 does not really change how these would be consumed. You just have to include these files in your compilation context in one of the many standard ways:

  1. Directly including it in a .ts file: ///<reference path="../typings/custom/lodash.d.ts" />

  2. Including ./typings/custom/lodash.d.ts in your files: [] property.

  3. Including ./typings/index.d.ts in your files: [] property (which then recursively includes the other typings.

  4. Adding ./typings/** to your includes:

Hopefully, based on this discussion you'll be able to tell why the changes you mad to your tsconfig.json made things work again.

EDIT:

One thing that I forgot to mention is that typeRoots and types property are really only useful for the automatic loading of global declarations.

For example if you

npm install @types/jquery

And you are using the default tsconfig, then that jquery types package will be loaded automatically and $ will be available throughout all your scripts wihtout having to do any further ///<reference/> or import

The typeRoots:[] property is meant to add additional locations from where type packages will be loaded frrom automatically.

The types:[] property's primary use-case is to disable the automatic loading behavior (by setting it to an empty array), and then only listing specific types you want to include globally.

The other way to load type packages from the various typeRoots is to use the new ///<reference types="jquery" /> directive. Notice the types instead of path. Again, this is only useful for global declaration files, typically ones that don't do import/export.

Now, here's one of the things that causes confusion with typeRoots. Remember, I said that typeRoots is about the global inclusion of modules. But @types/folder is also involved in standard module-resolution (regardless of your typeRoots setting).

Specifically, explicitly importing modules always bypasses all includes, excludes, files, typeRoots and types options. So when you do:

import {MyType} from 'my-module';

All the above mentioned properties are completely ignored. The relevant properties during module resolution are baseUrl, paths, and moduleResolution.

Basically, when using node module resolution, it will start searching for a file name my-module.ts, my-module.tsx, my-module.d.ts starting at the folder pointed to by your baseUrl configuration.

If it doesn't find the file, then it will look for a folder named my-module and then search for a package.json with a typings property, if there is package.json or no typings property inside telling it which file to load it will then search for index.ts/tsx/d.ts within that folder.

If that's still not successful it will search for these same things in the node_modules folder starting at your baseUrl/node_modules.

In addition, if it doesn't find these, it will search baseUrl/node_modules/@types for all the same things.

If it still didn't find anything it will start going to the parent directory and search node_modules and node_modules/@types there. It will keep going up the directories until it reaches the root of your file system (even getting node-modules outside your project).

One thing I want to emphasize is that module resolution completely ignores any typeRoots you set. So if you configured typeRoots: ["./my-types"], this will not get searched during explicit module resolution. It only serves as a folder where you can put global definition files you want to make available to the whole application without further need to import or reference.

Lastly, you can override the module behavior with path mappings (i.e. the paths property). So for example, I mentioned that any custom typeRoots is not consulted when trying to resolve a module. But if you liked you can make this behavior happen as so:

"paths" :{
     "*": ["my-custom-types/*", "*"]
 }

What this does is for all imports that match the left-hand side, try modifying the import as in the right side before trying to include it (the * on the right hand side represents your initial import string. For example if you import:

import {MyType} from 'my-types';

It would first try the import as if you had written:

import {MyType} from 'my-custom-types/my-types'

And then if it didn't find it would try again wihtout the prefix (second item in the array is just * which means the initial import.

So this way you can add additional folders to search for custom declaration files or even custom .ts modules that you want to be able to import.

You can also create custom mappings for specific modules:

"paths" :{
   "*": ["my-types", "some/custom/folder/location/my-awesome-types-file"]
 }

This would let you do

import {MyType} from 'my-types';

But then read those types from some/custom/folder/location/my-awesome-types-file.d.ts

  • 1
    Thanks for your detailed answer. It turns out the solutions work in isolation, but they don't mix well. It does clarify things so I'll give you the bounty. If you could find the time to answer a few more points, that might be really helpful for other people. (1) Is there a reason for typeRoots to only accept a specific folder structure? It seems arbitrary. (2) If I change typeRoots, typescript still includes the @types folders in node_modules, contrary to the spec. (3) What is paths and how is it different from include for the purpose of typings? – Jodiug Nov 2 '16 at 9:22
  • 1
    I edited the answer, let me know if you have any more questions. – dtabuenc Nov 2 '16 at 16:14
  • 1
    Thank you, I read the rest and wow. Props to you for finding all of this. It looks like there is a lot of unnecessarily complex behavior at work here. I hope Typescript will make their config properties a bit more self-documenting in the future. – Jodiug Nov 10 '16 at 7:11
  • 1
    There should be a link to this answer from typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/tsconfig-json.html – hgoebl Mar 4 '18 at 9:38
  • 2
    Shouldn't the last example be like "paths" :{ "my-types": ["some/custom/folder/location/my-awesome-types-file"] } ? – Koen. May 31 '18 at 9:09
6

Edit: out of date. Read the answer above.

I still don't understand this, but I found a solution. Use the following tsconfig.json:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "target": "ES6",
    "jsx": "react",
    "module": "commonjs",
    "sourceMap": true,
    "noImplicitAny": true,
    "experimentalDecorators": true,
    "baseUrl": ".",
    "paths": {
      "*": [
        "./typings/*"
      ]
    }
  },
  "include": [
    "src/**/*"
  ],
  "exclude": [
    "node_modules",
    "**/*.spec.ts"
  ]
}

Remove typings.json and everything under folder typings except lodash.d.ts. Also remove all the ///... references

1

"*": ["./types/*"] This line in tsconfig paths fixed everything after 2 hours struggle.

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "moduleResolution": "node",
    "strict": true,
    "baseUrl": ".",
    "paths": {
      "*": ["./types/*"]
    },
    "jsx": "react",
    "types": ["node", "jest"]
  },
  "include": [
    "client/**/*",
    "packages/**/*"
  ],
  "exclude": [
    "node_modules/**/*"
  ]
}

types is the folder name, which sits beside node_module i.e in the level of client folder (or src folder) types/third-party-lib/index.d.ts
index.d.ts has declare module 'third-party-lib';

Note: The above config is an incomplete config, just to give an idea of how it looks like with types, paths, include and exclude in it.

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