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So this is my first question on stack overflow. I'm working on a drum sequencer and want to implement a button to randomly fill the 80 checkboxes that indicate a drum sound being triggered. Currently what I have only filles one box of the 80 randomly, but I want each of them to have a random chance of being filled. The first part of my code simply clears the current selection. Here is my attempt in the following code:

private void button4_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    List<CheckBox> Checkboxlist = new List<CheckBox>();
    foreach (CheckBox control in this.Controls.OfType<CheckBox>())
    {
        Checkboxlist.Add(control);
        control.Checked = false;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i <= 200; i++)
    {
        var random = new Random();
        var r = random.Next(0, Checkboxlist.Count);
        var checkbox = Checkboxlist[r];
            checkbox.Checked = true;
    }
}

Thank you for looking!

2
  • Checkboxlist[r].Checked = true; Do this – vivek nuna Oct 24 '16 at 20:04
  • 1
    move var random = new Random(); out of the loop or you'll have random sequence badly skewed – Dmitry Bychenko Oct 24 '16 at 20:05
3

Don't create new Random() inside the loop. It is better to declare the random once, the best way is to create it as static member.

private static Random random = new Random(); // Class member

private void button4_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    List<CheckBox> Checkboxlist = new List<CheckBox>();
    foreach (CheckBox control in this.Controls.OfType<CheckBox>())
    {
        Checkboxlist.Add(control);
        control.Checked = false;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i <= 200; i++)
    {
        var r = random.Next(0, Checkboxlist.Count);
        var checkbox = Checkboxlist[r];
        checkbox.Checked = true;
    }
}

The reason for that is:

The random number generation starts from a seed value. If the same seed is used repeatedly, the same series of numbers is generated. One way to produce different sequences is to make the seed value time-dependent, thereby producing a different series with each new instance of Random. By default, the parameterless constructor of the Random class uses the system clock to generate its seed value,

Source

The rapid for-loop cause the Random to be created with the same seed, so the Next function returned the same first value of the series of numbers.

3
  • 1
    Even better, move it out of the event handler – Matias Cicero Oct 24 '16 at 20:06
  • Awesome! Got it working! Thank you all so much!!! – murderface Oct 24 '16 at 20:09
  • Better to put the checking in the first foreach loop: control.Checked = random.Next(0,99)>=50. //(eg. 50% to be checked) – lintabá Jan 22 '18 at 3:22
1

You should move the Random declaration out of the for loop:

var random = new Random();
for (int i = 0; i <= 200; i++)
{
    var r = random.Next(0, Checkboxlist.Count);
    var checkbox = Checkboxlist[r];
        checkbox.Checked = true;
}
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To go through and change to random values in all instances, this may work for you.

private void button4_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    List<CheckBox> Checkboxlist = new List<CheckBox>();
    foreach (CheckBox control in this.Controls.OfType<CheckBox>())
    {
        Checkboxlist.Add(control);
        control.Checked = false;
    }
    Random r = new Random();
    int g = 0;
    for ( int i = 0; i < Checkboxlist.Length; i++){
        g = r.Next(0,1);
        if(g ==1)
            Checkboxlist[i].Checked = true;
    }
}

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