2

So I recently discovered the use of map and vectors, however, I'm having trouble of trying to figure a way to loop through a vector containing strings.

Here's what I've tried:

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <stdio>

using namespace std;

void main() {
    vector<string> data={"Hello World!","Goodbye World!"};

    for (vector<string>::iterator t=data.begin(); t!=data.end(); ++t) {
        cout<<*t<<endl;
    }
}

and when I try to compile it, I get this error:

cd C:\Users\Jason\Desktop\EXB\Win32
wmake -f C:\Users\Jason\Desktop\EXB\Win32\exbint.mk -h -e
wpp386 ..\Source\exbint.cpp -i="C:\WATCOM/h;C:\WATCOM/h/nt" -w4 -e25 -zq -od    -d2 -6r -bt=nt -fo=.obj -mf -xs -xr
..\Source\exbint.cpp(59): Error! E157: col(21) left expression must be integral
..\Source\exbint.cpp(59): Note! N717: col(21) left operand type is 'std::ostream watcall (lvalue)'
..\Source\exbint.cpp(59): Note! N718: col(21) right operand type is 'std::basic_string<char,std::char_traits<char>,std::allocator<char>> (lvalue)'
Error(E42): Last command making (C:\Users\Jason\Desktop\EXB\Win32\exbint.obj) returned a bad status
Error(E02): Make execution terminated
Execution complete

I tried the same method using map and it worked. The only difference was I changed the cout line to:

cout<<t->first<<" => "<<t->last<<endl;
  • 1
    Works for me – StoryTeller Oct 25 '16 at 8:20
  • Completly fine. There's sometihng up with your includes or your compiler. – Sombrero Chicken Oct 25 '16 at 8:21
  • Can you provide a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example please. Did you miss to #include <string> eventually? – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 25 '16 at 8:21
  • 1
    Judging by the error text, your compiler treats the << as a bitshift for some reason. The bit of code that you posted is fine, though, so the error is somewhere else. – SingerOfTheFall Oct 25 '16 at 8:21
  • 2
    Your code is compliant and works perfectly well on every modern compiler. We can't help you. – Sombrero Chicken Oct 25 '16 at 8:33
8

Add iostream header file and change stdio to cstdio.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <cstdio>

using namespace std;

int main() 
{
    vector<string> data={"Hello World!","Goodbye World!"};
    for (vector<string>::iterator t=data.begin(); t!=data.end(); ++t) 
    {
        cout<<*t<<endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
0

When I compile your code, I get:

40234801.cpp:3:17: fatal error: stdio: No such file or directory
 #include <stdio>
                 ^

You clearly have a header called "stdio" in your include path that you haven't shown us.

If you change that line to the standard #include <iostream>, then the only reported error is that you wrote void main() instead of int main(). Fix that, and it will build and run.

In passing, note also that using namespace should be avoided.

0

From the Open Watcom V2 Fork-Wiki on the C++ Library Status page:

<string>

Mostly complete. Although there are no I/O operators, all other member functions and string operations are available.

A workaround (besides implementing the << operator) would be asking the string instances for the C string:

for (vector<string>::iterator t = data.begin(); t != data.end(); ++t) {
    cout << t->c_str() << endl;
}

This of course only works as long as the strings don't contain zero byte values.

-2

I found a solution to my own issue. Instead of using a c_str, I used std::string and switched to using the G++ compiler instead of Open Watcom

Instead of having:

char *someString="Blah blah blah";

I instead replaced it with:

string someString="Blah blah blah";

This way is much more efficient and easier.

  • 1
    this does not answer the question at all. Actually besides talking about string, there is no connection with the question at all. – bolov Sep 7 '17 at 7:56
  • What do you mean? It does answer my own question because my issue was a compilation error, but as I said in my answer, the issue was originating from the compiler itself, so I switched from open watcom to G++. – Jason Lee Sep 18 '17 at 22:53
  • 1
    in your original question there is no mention of c_str or char*. So 80-90% of your answer refers to something that is not in the question. The fact that you used watcom and that changing to gcc solved the issue is buried by all the other information. – bolov Sep 19 '17 at 7:49
  • Yes because I'm stating the fact that the use of c_str or char wasn't where my issue came from. I beleived it was, but what I'm saying is that it's rather an internal issue from the compiler. I'm not sure what you're trying to prove here. – Jason Lee Sep 20 '17 at 13:05
  • 1
    not trying to prove anything. Simply trying to make you understand the discrepancy between your question and your answer. In your question there is absolutely no mention of c_str. None. Not a trace. Nothing. And then in your answer you go on about c_str and char* vs string. The fact that you "thought the problem was with c_str" is completely irrelevant because you didn't write about it in your question and we are not mind readers. So while your answer might make sense to you, for the rest of the community who only can read your question and not your mind it doesn't. – bolov Sep 20 '17 at 15:03

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