46

I have a constants file constants.ts:

export const C0NST = "constant";

I access it in a service some.service.ts like so:

import { C0NST } from './constants';

console.log(C0NST); // "constant"

However, when I access it in a component template:

some.component.ts:

import { C0NST } from './constants';

some.component.html:

{{ C0NST }} <!-- Outputs nothing -->

However defining a member in the component class works:

some.component.ts

public const constant = C0NST;

some.component.html

{{ constant }} <!-- constant -->

I don't understand why I was able to access the imported constant directly in the service class but not in the component template even though I imported it in the component class.

44

In Angular2, the template can only access fields and methods of the component class. Everything else is off-limits. This includes things which are visible to the component class.

The way to go around this is to have a field inside the component, which just references the constant, and use that instead.


It's one limitation of the design, but perhaps you should thing more about why you need a constant in the template in the first place. Usually these things are used by components themselves, or services, but not the template.

  • Thanks Horia. I have a list of GIF URLs that I need to source from Giphy so I'm saving the URLs in the constants file. I intend to use these throughout the application across components. What is a better way according to you? – Karmasakshi Goyal Oct 25 '16 at 11:07
  • 1
    @KabirRoy That sounds like a decent thing to do actually. If you have a relatively small number of images, you could actually create components for them, and use the giphy URL directly in the source (like you'd be doing for an asset provided by your application). But this sounds like a good approach, regardless. – Horia Coman Oct 25 '16 at 11:19
24

Since in the Component's template you can only use attributes of the Component's class, you can't directly use any external constants (or external variables).

The most elegant way that I've found so far is the following:

import { MY_CONSTANT } from '../constants';

@Component({
  // ...
})
export class MyTestComponent implements OnInit {

  readonly MY_CONSTANT = MY_CONSTANT;

  // ...
}

which basically just creates a new attribute MY_CONSTANT inside the component class. Using readonly we make sure that the new attribute cannot be modified.

Doing so, in your template you can now use:

{{ MY_CONSTANT }}

  • This is the correct answer but you should add static to avoid reassignment in constructor. So it really should be: readonly myConstant = MY_CONSTANT; Please also note style guide recommendations for constant syntax. – mrgoos Oct 29 '18 at 6:51
19

The scope of Angular2 template bindings is the component instance. Only what's accessible there can be used in bindings.

You can make it available like

class MyComponent {
  myConst = CONST;
}
{{myConst}}
  • Any downsides to this ? I am thinking that if I CONST is a enum and change detection is Push there should be none. – bhantol Jun 28 '18 at 17:16
  • 1
    @bhantol I don't think there are downsides. – Günter Zöchbauer Jun 28 '18 at 17:50
  • This is not a constant. myConst can be reassigned. – mrgoos Oct 29 '18 at 6:49
  • @mrgoos CONST is constant. You can't access const values directly in Angular bindings (at least not at the time when I posted this answer - not up-to-date with Angular development) – Günter Zöchbauer Oct 29 '18 at 7:08
  • @GünterZöchbauer- it is constant but myConst is not. It can be modified in MyComponent class. – mrgoos Nov 1 '18 at 8:26
11

There are two best directions in my opinion:

Wrapping constants as internal component property

enum.ts

export enum stateEnum {
  'DOING' = 0,
  'DONE',
  'FAILED'
}

component.ts

import { stateEnum  } from './enum'
export class EnumUserClass {
  readonly stateEnum : typeof stateEnum = stateEnum ;    
}

Example uses enum, but this can be any type of defined constant. typeof operator gives you all of benefits of TypeScript typing features. You can use then this variable directly in templates:

component.html

<p>{{stateEnum.DOING}}<p>

This solution is less efficient in memory usage context, because you are basically duplicating data (or references to constants) in each component you wish to use it. Beside that, syntax
readonly constData: typeof constData = constData
in my opinion introduce a lot of syntax noise and may be confusing to newcommers

Wrapping external constant in component function

Second option is to wrap your external variable/constant with component function and use that function on template:

enum.ts

export enum stateEnum {
  'DOING' = 0,
  'DONE',
  'FAILED'
}

component.ts

import { stateEnum  } from './enum'
export class EnumUserClass {
  getEnumString(idx) {
    return stateEnum[stateEnum[idx]];
  }   
}

component.html

<p>{{getEnumString(1)}}</p>  

Good thing is that data is not duplicated in controller but other major downside occur. According to Angular team, usage of functions in templates is not recommended due to change detection mechanism, which works way less efficient in case of functions returning values to templates: change detection have no idea does value return by a function has changed, so it will be called way often than needed (and assuming you returning const from it, it's actually needed only once, when populating template view. It may be just a bit efficiency killing to your application (if you are lucky) or it may totally break it down if function resolves with Observable for instance, and you use async pipe to subscribe to results. You can refer to my short article on that HERE

2

You can create a BaseComponent , it is a place where you should create your constant instances and then you can create your FooComponent extends BaseComponent and you can use your constants.

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