23

Assume that I have programs P0, P1, ...P(n-1) for some n > 0. How can I easily redirect the output of program Pi to program P(i+1 mod n) for all i (0 <= i < n)?

For example, let's say I have a program square, which repeatedly reads a number and than prints the square of that number, and a program calc, which sometimes prints a number after which it expects to be able to read the square of it. How do I connect these programs such that whenever calc prints a number, square squares it returns it to calc?

Edit: I should probably clarify what I mean with "easily". The named pipe/fifo solution is one that indeed works (and I have used in the past), but it actually requires quite a bit of work to do properly if you compare it with using a bash pipe. (You need to get a not yet existing filename, make a pipe with that name, run the "pipe loop", clean up the named pipe.) Imagine you could no longer write prog1 | prog2 and would always have to use named pipes to connect programs.

I'm looking for something that is almost as easy as writing a "normal" pipe. For instance something like { prog1 | prog2 } >&0 would be great.

7 Answers 7

27

After spending quite some time yesterday trying to redirect stdout to stdin, I ended up with the following method. It isn't really nice, but I think I prefer it over the named pipe/fifo solution.

read | { P0 | ... | P(n-1); } >/dev/fd/0

The { ... } >/dev/fd/0 is to redirect stdout to stdin for the pipe sequence as a whole (i.e. it redirects the output of P(n-1) to the input of P0). Using >&0 or something similar does not work; this is probably because bash assumes 0 is read-only while it doesn't mind writing to /dev/fd/0.

The initial read-pipe is necessary because without it both the input and output file descriptor are the same pts device (at least on my system) and the redirect has no effect. (The pts device doesn't work as a pipe; writing to it puts things on your screen.) By making the input of the { ... } a normal pipe, the redirect has the desired effect.

To illustrate with my calc/square example:

function calc() {
  # calculate sum of squares of numbers 0,..,10

  sum=0
  for ((i=0; i<10; i++)); do
    echo $i                   # "request" the square of i

    read ii                   # read the square of i
    echo "got $ii" >&2          # debug message

    let sum=$sum+$ii
  done

  echo "sum $sum" >&2           # output result to stderr
}

function square() {
  # square numbers

  read j                         # receive first "request"
  while [ "$j" != "" ]; do
    let jj=$j*$j
    echo "square($j) = $jj" >&2  # debug message

    echo $jj                     # send square

    read j                       # receive next "request"
  done
}

read | { calc | square; } >/dev/fd/0

Running the above code gives the following output:

square(0) = 0
got 0
square(1) = 1
got 1
square(2) = 4
got 4
square(3) = 9
got 9
square(4) = 16
got 16
square(5) = 25
got 25
square(6) = 36
got 36
square(7) = 49
got 49
square(8) = 64
got 64
square(9) = 81
got 81
sum 285

Of course, this method is quite a bit of a hack. Especially the read part has an undesired side-effect: termination of the "real" pipe loop does not lead to termination of the whole. I couldn't think of anything better than read as it seems that you can only determine that the pipe loop has terminated by try to writing write something to it.

2
  • 1
    Nice solution. I had to do something similar using netcat inside a loop and worked around the 'read' side effect by 'closing' its input with an 'echo'. In the end it was something like this : echo | read | { P0 | ... | P(n-1); } >/dev/fd/0 Commented Nov 30, 2011 at 16:29
  • 2
    Instead of echo|read one could use a command that terminates immediately, like : (true), e.g. : | { cmd | cmd >/dev/fd/0}. Example: : | { nc -lp 5000 >/dev/fd/0; } is a simple echo server that correctly terminates on client EOF.
    – regnarg
    Commented Jul 31, 2014 at 20:46
15

A named pipe might do it:

$ mkfifo outside
$ <outside calc | square >outside &
$ echo "1" >outside ## Trigger the loop to start
5
  • Could you explain the line "<outside calc | square >outside &"? I am unsure about <outside and >outside. Commented May 7, 2009 at 18:35
  • They're standard shell redirects - reading in from 'outside' and outputting to 'outside'. outside is a fifo, so everything written to it, comes out the read side. Commented May 8, 2009 at 8:29
  • I tried this code, but it doesn't work. It seems that this line: <outside calc | square >outside & finishes immediately.
    – RnMss
    Commented Jun 19, 2013 at 10:03
  • @RnMss maybe awk doesn't wait for input if its stdin isn't a terminal? I suggest you ask a new question, explaining why you need to do a loop of input with awk, and what you've already tried. Commented Jun 19, 2013 at 12:48
  • There's also a solution without named pipe script - Bash: create anonymous fifo - Super User
    – user202729
    Commented Aug 7, 2022 at 17:43
5

This is a very interesting question. I (vaguely) remember an assignment very similar in college 17 years ago. We had to create an array of pipes, where our code would get filehandles for the input/output of each pipe. Then the code would fork and close the unused filehandles.

I'm thinking you could do something similar with named pipes in bash. Use mknod or mkfifo to create a set of pipes with unique names you can reference then fork your program.

0
3

My solutions uses pipexec (Most of the function implementation comes from your answer):

square.sh

function square() {
  # square numbers

  read j                         # receive first "request"
  while [ "$j" != "" ]; do
    let jj=$j*$j
    echo "square($j) = $jj" >&2  # debug message

    echo $jj                     # send square

    read j                       # receive next "request"
  done
}

square $@

calc.sh

function calc() {
  # calculate sum of squares of numbers 0,..,10

  sum=0
  for ((i=0; i<10; i++)); do
    echo $i                   # "request" the square of i

    read ii                   # read the square of i
    echo "got $ii" >&2          # debug message

    let sum=$sum+$ii
 done

 echo "sum $sum" >&2           # output result to stderr
}

calc $@

The command

pipexec [ CALC /bin/bash calc.sh ] [ SQUARE /bin/bash square.sh ] \
    "{CALC:1>SQUARE:0}" "{SQUARE:1>CALC:0}"

The output (same as in your answer)

square(0) = 0
got 0
square(1) = 1
got 1
square(2) = 4
got 4
square(3) = 9
got 9
square(4) = 16
got 16
square(5) = 25
got 25
square(6) = 36
got 36
square(7) = 49
got 49
square(8) = 64
got 64
square(9) = 81
got 81
sum 285

Comment: pipexec was designed to start processes and build arbitrary pipes in between. Because bash functions cannot be handled as processes, there is the need to have the functions in separate files and use a separate bash.

1

Named pipes.

Create a series of fifos, using mkfifo

i.e fifo0, fifo1

Then attach each process in term to the pipes you want:

processn < fifo(n-1) > fifon

-1

I doubt sh/bash can do it. ZSH would be a better bet, with its MULTIOS and coproc features.

1
-2

A command stack can be composed as string from an array of arbitrary commands and evaluated with eval. The following example gives the result 65536.

function square ()
{
  read n
  echo $((n*n))
}    # ----------  end of function square  ----------

declare -a  commands=( 'echo 4' 'square' 'square' 'square' )

#-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
#   build the command stack using pipes
#-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
declare     stack=${commands[0]}

for (( COUNTER=1; COUNTER<${#commands[@]}; COUNTER++ )); do
  stack="${stack} | ${commands[${COUNTER}]}"
done

#-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
#   run the command stack
#-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
eval "$stack" 
1
  • 1
    I don't think you're answering the question. Commented Jan 29, 2010 at 15:04

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