1

printf ( "Some string here" , ++ i ++ && & i * * * a ) ;

I am confused, how to count the number of tokens for this code snippet. Basically, I am not getting how &&& and *** will be counted.

I think && is one token and & is one, while, *** are total 3 tokens, but i am not sure that it is right or not.

I have edited the code with whitespaces to seperate tokens .

Can someone explain with any technique, so that i can apply for any code snippet?

Any help will be greatly appreciated !!

  • @WeatherVane, edited !! Can you please check now – Garrick Oct 25 '16 at 18:13
  • How is a declared? – imreal Oct 25 '16 at 18:15
  • Why does it matter how a is declared? The question is about tokenizing. a is one token. – itsme86 Oct 25 '16 at 18:15
  • But the compiler doesn't know that at the tokenizing stage. After tokenization it then might determine that there's an error that gets reported, but it doesn't matter when it's tokenized. – itsme86 Oct 25 '16 at 18:18
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    This already a complete and valid program from the point of view of lexical analysis. It's C semantics where it all fails one way or another. – aschepler Oct 25 '16 at 18:19
1

C tokenization is "greedy" - it attempts to build the longest legal token first. See the online C 2011 draft standard, section 6.4.6 (Punctuators) for the list of legal punctuator tokens (&&, ++, etc.).

The sequence ++i++&&&i***a will be tokenized as ++, i, ++, &&, &, i, *, *, *, a. It will be parsed as (++(i++)) && ((&i) * (**a)), which is not a legal expression (the result of i++ is not an lvalue, so it cannot be the operand of the unary ++ operator).

  • 1
    Not to mention you can't multiply a pointer value by anything. – aschepler Oct 25 '16 at 18:26
  • @aschepler: that too. – John Bode Oct 25 '16 at 18:26
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    @Willturner: I count 10 tokens overall, 6 distinct token values. Not sure how that maps to lexemes. At the tokenization stage there's no distinction between pre- and postfix ++ - that comes during syntax analysis. – John Bode Oct 25 '16 at 18:35
  • @JohnBode, Thanku very much. I got it . – Garrick Oct 25 '16 at 18:38
  • If it were C++, the expression might be valid, depending on the types of i and a and the existence of appropriate operator methods. – rici Oct 25 '16 at 18:54
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Your analysis is correct. Tokenization in C is greedy, meaning that when &&& is encountered, the longest possible token && is scanned first. There is no ** token, so each * character is its own token.

The tokens are:

  1. printf
  2. (
  3. "Some string here"
  4. ,
  5. ++
  6. i
  7. ++
  8. &&
  9. &
  10. i
  11. *
  12. *
  13. *
  14. a
  15. )
  16. ;
  • I'm not sure how you're defining / counting lexemes. – aschepler Oct 25 '16 at 18:23
  • printf is a lexeme, ++, && are all predefined inside the compiler, hence are called lexemes . Note: i am not talking about distinct lexemes. I am saying total number of lexemes . – Garrick Oct 25 '16 at 18:25

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