373

What are the basic steps to setting up automapper?

5

20 Answers 20

795

I figured it out! Here's the details:

  1. Add the main AutoMapper Package to your solution via NuGet.
  2. [Pre-v13.x] If using AutoMapper prior to v13.x, add the AutoMapper Dependency Injection Package to your solution via NuGet. However, do note::

This package has been deprecated as it is legacy and is no longer maintained.

  1. Create a new class for a mapping profile. (I made a class in the main solution directory called MappingProfile.cs and add the following code.) I'll use a User and UserDto object as an example.

     public class MappingProfile : Profile {
         public MappingProfile() {
             // Add as many of these lines as you need to map your objects
             CreateMap<User, UserDto>();
             CreateMap<UserDto, User>();
         }
     }
    
  2. Then add the AutoMapperConfiguration in the Startup.cs as shown below:

     public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) {
         // .... Ignore code before this
    
        // Auto Mapper Configurations
         var mapperConfig = new MapperConfiguration(mc =>
         {
             mc.AddProfile(new MappingProfile());
         });
    
         IMapper mapper = mapperConfig.CreateMapper();
         services.AddSingleton(mapper);
    
         services.AddMvc();
    
     }
    
  3. To invoke the mapped object in code, do something like the following:

     public class UserController : Controller {
    
         // Create a field to store the mapper object
         private readonly IMapper _mapper;
    
         // Assign the object in the constructor for dependency injection
         public UserController(IMapper mapper) {
             _mapper = mapper;
         }
    
         public async Task<IActionResult> Edit(string id) {
    
             // Instantiate source object
             // (Get it from the database or whatever your code calls for)
             var user = await _context.Users
                 .SingleOrDefaultAsync(u => u.Id == id);
    
             // Instantiate the mapped data transfer object
             // using the mapper you stored in the private field.
             // The type of the source object is the first type argument
             // and the type of the destination is the second.
             // Pass the source object you just instantiated above
             // as the argument to the _mapper.Map<>() method.
             var model = _mapper.Map<UserDto>(user);
    
             // .... Do whatever you want after that!
         }
     }
    
17
  • 6
    The detailed article linked, lostechies.com/jimmybogard/2016/07/20/…, explains how Profile classes are located Commented Dec 22, 2016 at 8:25
  • 34
    @theutz You can merge those two CreateMap lines with a .ReverseMap() at the end of, well, either. Maybe comment it, but I find it more intuitive. Commented Mar 31, 2017 at 12:40
  • 6
    It might be helpful on Step 3 to mention adding a "using AutoMapper;" at the top so that the extension method is imported.
    – Rocklan
    Commented May 30, 2017 at 1:47
  • 11
    This worked fine with .net core 1.1, not anymore once I upgraded to .net core 2.0. I think, I need to explicitly specify the logic profile class assembly. Still researching how to accomplish that. Update: Ah the answer resides on your comment, I have to pass the typeof class which is my profile. // services.AddAutoMapper(typeof(Startup)); // <-- newer automapper version uses this signature
    – Esen
    Commented Sep 23, 2017 at 16:35
  • 4
    In AutoMapper v8 and the Dependency Injection v5 add on, the only thing needed is the services.AddAutoMapper(); line in the ConfigureServices method of the Startup class. For me, it was even able to find Profile classes in dependent class library projects.
    – stricq
    Commented Dec 17, 2018 at 5:06
104

Step To Use AutoMapper with ASP.NET Core.

Step 1. Installing AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection from NuGet Package.

enter image description here

Step 2. Create a Folder in Solution to keep Mappings with Name "Mappings".

enter image description here

Step 3. After adding Mapping folder we have added a class with Name "MappingProfile" this name can anything unique and good to understand.

In this class, we are going to Maintain all Mappings.

enter image description here

Step 4. Initializing Mapper in Startup "ConfigureServices"

In Startup Class, we Need to Initialize Profile which we have created and also Register AutoMapper Service.

  Mapper.Initialize(cfg => cfg.AddProfile<MappingProfile>());

  services.AddAutoMapper();

Code Snippet to show ConfigureServices Method where we need to Initialize and Register AutoMapper.

public class Startup
{
    public Startup(IConfiguration configuration)
    {
        Configuration = configuration;
    }

    public IConfiguration Configuration { get; }


    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.Configure<CookiePolicyOptions>(options =>
        {
            // This lambda determines whether user consent for non-essential cookies is needed for a given request.
            options.CheckConsentNeeded = context => true;
            options.MinimumSameSitePolicy = SameSiteMode.None;
        });


        // Start Registering and Initializing AutoMapper

        Mapper.Initialize(cfg => cfg.AddProfile<MappingProfile>());
        services.AddAutoMapper();

        // End Registering and Initializing AutoMapper

        services.AddMvc().SetCompatibilityVersion(CompatibilityVersion.Version_2_1);

    }}

Step 5. Get Output.

To Get Mapped result we need to call AutoMapper.Mapper.Map and pass Proper Destination and Source.

AutoMapper.Mapper.Map<Destination>(source);

CodeSnippet

    [HttpPost]
    public void Post([FromBody] SchemeMasterViewModel schemeMaster)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            var mappedresult = AutoMapper.Mapper.Map<SchemeMaster>(schemeMaster);
        }
    }
4
  • 26
    I get the following error: 'Mapper' does not contain a definition for 'initialize'. I'm using AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection version 7.0.0
    – kimbaudi
    Commented Oct 14, 2019 at 2:06
  • Super detailed answer. Thank you sir. Commented Oct 29, 2019 at 22:26
  • 6
    if you are using ASP.NET CORE 3.0 check this tutorial How to Set up AutoMapper in ASP.NET Core 3.0 tutexchange.com/how-to-set-up-automapper-in-asp-net-core-3-0 Commented Mar 1, 2020 at 11:02
  • What if I want to call CompileMappings*( on MapperConfiguration before calling AddAutoMapper? Commented Sep 14, 2020 at 7:31
59

I want to extend @theutz's answers - namely this line :

// services.AddAutoMapper(typeof(Startup));  // <-- newer automapper version uses this signature.

There is a bug (probably) in AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection version 3.2.0. (I'm using .NET Core 2.0)

This is tackled in this GitHub issue. If your classes inheriting AutoMapper's Profile class exist outside of assembly where you Startup class is they will probably not be registered if your AutoMapper injection looks like this:

services.AddAutoMapper();

unless you explicitly specify which assemblies to search AutoMapper profiles for.

It can be done like this in your Startup.ConfigureServices:

services.AddAutoMapper(<assembies> or <type_in_assemblies>);

where "assemblies" and "type_in_assemblies" point to the assembly where Profile classes in your application are specified. E.g:

services.AddAutoMapper(typeof(ProfileInOtherAssembly), typeof(ProfileInYetAnotherAssembly));

I suppose (and I put emphasis on this word) that due to following implementation of parameterless overload (source code from GitHub) :

public static IServiceCollection AddAutoMapper(this IServiceCollection services)
{
     return services.AddAutoMapper(null, AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies());
}

we rely on CLR having already JITed assembly containing AutoMapper profiles which might be or might not be true as they are only jitted when needed (more details in this StackOverflow question).

4
  • 9
    Thats the correct answer for latest version of AutoMapper and AspNetCore
    – Joshit
    Commented May 7, 2019 at 9:31
  • 1
    this was the answer I was looking for for AutoMapper 8.1 (latest version)
    – Tinaira
    Commented Jun 16, 2019 at 16:08
  • What if I want to call CompileMappings*( on MapperConfiguration before calling AddAutoMapper? Commented Sep 14, 2020 at 7:31
  • FYI: 1) this answer says theutz answer references AddAutoMapper() but it doesn't, 2) the parameterless AddAutoMapper() extension method has been removed; I'm using version 11.0 ... FWIW the automapper API seems to change alot over time (which is a PITA) and I think theutz updated his answer at some point
    – steve
    Commented Jan 11, 2022 at 15:38
39

I solved it this way (similar to above but I feel like it's a cleaner solution) Works with .NET Core 3.x

Create MappingProfile.cs class and populate constructor with Maps (I plan on using a single class to hold all my mappings)

    public class MappingProfile : Profile
    {
        public MappingProfile()
        {
            CreateMap<Source, Dest>().ReverseMap();
        }
    }

In Startup.cs, add below to add to DI (the assembly arg is for the class that holds your mapping configs, in my case, it's the MappingProfile class).

//add automapper DI
services.AddAutoMapper(typeof(MappingProfile));

In Controller, use it like you would any other DI object

    [Route("api/[controller]")]
    [ApiController]
    public class AnyController : ControllerBase
    {
        private readonly IMapper _mapper;

        public AnyController(IMapper mapper)
        {
            _mapper = mapper;
        }
        
        public IActionResult Get(int id)
        {
            var entity = repository.Get(id);
            var dto = _mapper.Map<Dest>(entity);
            
            return Ok(dto);
        }
    }


3
  • 2
    I like your answer. I think wrapping MappingProfiles with new Type[]{} as shown in this answer is unnecessary. Commented Aug 29, 2019 at 12:18
  • 1
    Don't forget install DI at the beginning: AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection
    – John Jang
    Commented Apr 27, 2021 at 3:00
  • you also need to add services.AddScoped<IMapper, Mapper>(); in your Startup.cs, IMapper is AutoMapper interface and Mapper is from AutoMapper, so we don't need to do anything
    – milos
    Commented Aug 26, 2021 at 0:04
32

theutz' answer here is very good, I just want to add this:

If you let your mapping profile inherit from MapperConfigurationExpression instead of Profile, you can very simply add a test to verify your mapping setup, which is always handy:

[Fact]
public void MappingProfile_VerifyMappings()
{
    var mappingProfile = new MappingProfile();

    var config = new MapperConfiguration(mappingProfile);
    var mapper = new Mapper(config);

    (mapper as IMapper).ConfigurationProvider.AssertConfigurationIsValid();
}
3
  • I am getting one error : "AutoMapper Extension Dependency injection is incompatible with asp.net core 1.1 ". Please help! Commented Aug 31, 2017 at 4:38
  • It seems the definition of "verify" is up for debate. This blows up when certain properties are ommitted by design to prevent mapping.
    – user610217
    Commented Mar 21, 2018 at 19:36
  • 2
    If you don’t want a property mapped, set it up with .Ignore(). That way, it forces you to actively think about handling each case - making sure you don’t miss out on stuff when changes are being made. Super practical, actually. So yes, the verify-test is a larger safety net than many people realise. It’s not foolproof, but it takes care of the first 90%. Commented Mar 23, 2018 at 5:13
18

I like a lot of answers, particularly @saineshwar 's one. I'm using .net Core 3.0 with AutoMapper 9.0, so I feel it's time to update its answer.

What worked for me was in Startup.ConfigureServices(...) register the service in this way:

    services.AddAutoMapper(cfg => cfg.AddProfile<MappingProfile>(), 
                               AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies());

I think that rest of @saineshwar answer keeps perfect. But if anyone is interested my controller code is:

[HttpGet("{id}")]
public async Task<ActionResult> GetIic(int id)
{
    // _context is a DB provider
    var Iic = await _context.Find(id).ConfigureAwait(false);

    if (Iic == null)
    {
        return NotFound();
    }

    var map = _mapper.Map<IicVM>(Iic);

    return Ok(map);
}

And my mapping class:

public class MappingProfile : Profile
{
    public MappingProfile()
    {
        CreateMap<Iic, IicVM>()
            .ForMember(dest => dest.DepartmentName, o => o.MapFrom(src => src.Department.Name))
            .ForMember(dest => dest.PortfolioTypeName, o => o.MapFrom(src => src.PortfolioType.Name));
            //.ReverseMap();
    }
}

----- EDIT -----

After reading the docs linked in the comments by Lucian Bargaoanu, I think it's better to change this answer a bit.

The parameterless services.AddAutoMapper() (that had the @saineshwar answer) doesn't work anymore (at least for me). But if you use the NuGet assembly AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection, the framework is able to inspect all the classes that extend AutoMapper.Profile (like mine, MappingProfile).

So, in my case, where the class belong to the same executing assembly, the service registration can be shortened to services.AddAutoMapper(System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly());
(A more elegant approach could be a parameterless extension with this coding).

Thanks, Lucian!

1
18

At the latest versions of asp.net core you should use the following initialization:

services.AddAutoMapper(typeof(YourMappingProfileClass));
2
  • Thanks.This works. I am using Net core 3.0. My object is not even complicate. it has only 2 properties, id and name. For some reason, in one of the Youtube totorial, I followed the project 100% include this line, AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies(), and it worked. However, when I started from the scratch. Your solution works
    – user12345
    Commented Aug 24, 2020 at 16:50
  • 1
    we can use services.AddAutoMapper(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()); to get all mapping classes that derive from the Profile class in this assembly. Commented Apr 29, 2021 at 12:27
13

Need to install a package for setting up the automapper.

dotnet add package AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection

After the AddAutoMapper will be available in services.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
     services.AddAutoMapper(typeof(Startup));
}

Create mapper from Employee class to EmployeeDTO.

using AutoMapper;

public class AutomapperProfile: Profile
{
    public AutomapperProfile()
    {
        //Source to destination.
        CreateMap<Employee,EmployeeDTO>();
    }
}

EmployeeController maps from Employee to EmployeeDTo

using System.Collections.Generic;
using AutoMapper;
using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;

[Route("api/[controller]")]
[ApiController()]
public class EmployeeController : ControllerBase
{
    private readonly IMapper _mapper;

    public EmployeeController(IMapper mapper)
    {
        _mapper = mapper;
    }

    [HttpGet]
    public IEnumerable<EmployeeDTO> GetEmployees()
    {
        /* 
        Assume it to be a  service call/database call
        it returns a list of employee, and now we will map it to EmployeeDTO
        */
        var employees = Employee.SetupEmployee();
        var employeeDTO = _mapper.Map<IEnumerable<EmployeeDTO>>(employees);
        return employeeDTO;

    }
}

Employee.cs for reference

using System.Collections.Generic;

public class Employee
{
    public int EmployeeId { get; set; }
    public string EmployeeName { get; set; }
    public int Salary { get; set; }

    public static IEnumerable<Employee> SetupEmployee()
    {
        return new List<Employee>()
        {
            new Employee(){EmployeeId = 1, EmployeeName ="First", Salary=10000},
            new Employee(){EmployeeId = 2, EmployeeName ="Second", Salary=20000},
            new Employee(){EmployeeId = 3, EmployeeName ="Third", Salary=30000},
            new Employee(){EmployeeId = 4, EmployeeName ="Fourth", Salary=40000},
            new Employee(){EmployeeId = 5, EmployeeName ="Fifth", Salary=50000}
        };
    }

}

EmployeeDTO.cs for reference

public class EmployeeDTO
{
    public int EmployeeId { get; set; }
    public string EmployeeName { get; set; }
}
10

In my Startup.cs (Core 2.2, Automapper 8.1.1)

services.AddAutoMapper(new Type[] { typeof(DAL.MapperProfile) });            

In my data access project

namespace DAL
{
    public class MapperProfile : Profile
    {
        // place holder for AddAutoMapper (to bring in the DAL assembly)
    }
}

In my model definition

namespace DAL.Models
{
    public class PositionProfile : Profile
    {
        public PositionProfile()
        {
            CreateMap<Position, PositionDto_v1>();
        }
    }

    public class Position
    {
        ...
    }
1
  • Why don't you just use services.AddAutoMapper( typeof(DAL.MapperProfile) ); instead of services.AddAutoMapper(new Type[] { typeof(DAL.MapperProfile) }); ? Commented Aug 29, 2019 at 12:13
10

For AutoMapper 9.0.0:

public static IEnumerable<Type> GetAutoMapperProfilesFromAllAssemblies()
    {
        foreach (var assembly in AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies())
        {
            foreach (var aType in assembly.GetTypes())
            {
                if (aType.IsClass && !aType.IsAbstract && aType.IsSubclassOf(typeof(Profile)))
                    yield return aType;
            }
        }
    }

MapperProfile:

public class OrganizationProfile : Profile
{
  public OrganizationProfile()
  {
    CreateMap<Foo, FooDto>();
    // Use CreateMap... Etc.. here (Profile methods are the same as configuration methods)
  }
}

In your Startup:

services.AddAutoMapper(GetAutoMapperProfilesFromAllAssemblies()
            .ToArray());

In Controller or service: Inject mapper:

private readonly IMapper _mapper;

Usage:

var obj = _mapper.Map<TDest>(sourceObject);
1
  • Awesome @Nicolae Lupei
    – Velkumar
    Commented Jan 5, 2021 at 18:26
7

I am using AutoMapper 6.1.1 and asp.net Core 1.1.2.

First of all, define Profile classes inherited by Profile Class of Automapper. I Created IProfile interface which is empty, the purpose is only to find the classes of this type.

 public class UserProfile : Profile, IProfile
    {
        public UserProfile()
        {
            CreateMap<User, UserModel>();
            CreateMap<UserModel, User>();
        }
    }

Now create a separate class e.g Mappings

 public class Mappings
    {
     public static void RegisterMappings()
     {            
       var all =
       Assembly
          .GetEntryAssembly()
          .GetReferencedAssemblies()
          .Select(Assembly.Load)
          .SelectMany(x => x.DefinedTypes)
          .Where(type => typeof(IProfile).GetTypeInfo().IsAssignableFrom(type.AsType()));

            foreach (var ti in all)
            {
                var t = ti.AsType();
                if (t.Equals(typeof(IProfile)))
                {
                    Mapper.Initialize(cfg =>
                    {
                        cfg.AddProfiles(t); // Initialise each Profile classe
                    });
                }
            }         
        }

    }

Now in MVC Core web Project in Startup.cs file, in the constructor, call Mapping class which will initialize all mappings at the time of application loading.

Mappings.RegisterMappings();
2
  • You can just create a subclass from profile class, and when program is running services.AddAutoMapper(); line of codes The automapper automatically knows them.
    – isaeid
    Commented Oct 1, 2017 at 13:49
  • I don't think this is necessary if you use AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependancyInjection which is available in nuget.
    – Greg Gum
    Commented Aug 18, 2018 at 10:43
7

First step is to install the corresponding nuget package for the AutoMapper

Install-Package AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection

After installing the package,we need to configure in program.cs file

builder.Services.AddAutoMapper(typeof(Program));
builder.Services.AddControllersWithViews()

Here is my customer class and getCustomerDto

public class User
{
  public int Id { get; set; }
  public string FirstName { get; set; }
  public string LastName { get; set; }
}
 
public class getCustomerDto
{
  public string FirstName { get; set; }
  public string LastName { get; set; }
}

We can create a new file 'AutoMapperProfiles.cs' for all automapper configuration .In this file we need to create a class that inherits Profiles. And In the Constructor we can have our automapper configurations.

public class AutoMapper: Profile {
public AutoMapper() 
  {
    CreateMap < Customer, getCustomerDto > ();
  }
}

In our controller we can make use of the auto mapper configuration that we have defined

public class CustomerController : Controller
{
  private readonly IMapper _mapper;

  public CustomerController(IMapper mapper)
  {
    _mapper = mapper;
  }

  public IActionResult Index()

  {
    
    var customer = GetCustomerDetails();

    var customerDetails = _mapper.Map<getCustomerDto>(customer);
    
    return View(customerDetails);

  }
}

Now By doing these the properties in Customer class are automatically mapped to the customerDetailsDto.

6

In .NET 6 you'll need to add the following to the Program.cs file:

builder.Services.AddAutoMapper(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies());
2
  • have u done aftter mapper
    – user123456
    Commented Aug 9, 2022 at 13:39
  • That's not all you need to do #smackforehead
    – Fandango68
    Commented Mar 3, 2023 at 5:54
5

For ASP.NET Core (tested using 2.0+ and 3.0), if you prefer to read the source documentation: https://github.com/AutoMapper/AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection/blob/master/README.md

Otherwise following these 4 steps works:

  1. Install AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependancyInjection from nuget.

  2. Simply add some profile classes.

  3. Then add below to your startup.cs class. services.AddAutoMapper(OneOfYourProfileClassNamesHere)

  4. Then simply Inject IMapper in your controllers or wherever you need it:

public class EmployeesController {

    private readonly IMapper _mapper;

    public EmployeesController(IMapper mapper){

        _mapper = mapper;
    }

And if you want to use ProjectTo its now simply:

var customers = await dbContext.Customers.ProjectTo<CustomerDto>(_mapper.ConfigurationProvider).ToListAsync()
1
  • What if I want to call CompileMappings*( on MapperConfiguration before calling AddAutoMapper? Commented Sep 14, 2020 at 7:32
3

Let’s have a look at how to add Auto mapper into our .NET Core application.

step: 1 The first step is to install the corresponding NuGet package:

Install-Package AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection

step: 2

After installing the required package, the next step is to configure the services. Let’s do it in the Startup.cs class:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddAutoMapper(typeof(Startup));
    services.AddControllersWithViews();
}

step: 3

Let’s start usage we have a domain object named User:

public class User
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string Address { get; set; }
}

In the UI layer, we would have a View Model to display the user information:

public class UserViewModel
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
}

step: 4

A good way to organize our mapping configurations is with Profiles. We need to create classes that inherit from Profile class and put the configuration in the constructor:

public UserProfile()
{
    CreateMap<User, UserViewModel>();
}

step: 5

Now, let’s define a Controller and use the Auto-Mapping capabilities that we just added:

public class UserController : Controller
{
    private readonly IMapper _mapper;
    public UserController(IMapper mapper)
    {
        _mapper = mapper;
    }
    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        // Populate the user details from DB
        var user = GetUserDetails();
        UserViewModel userViewModel = _mapper.Map<UserViewModel>(user);
        return View(userViewModel);
    }
}

First, we inject the mapper object into the controller. Then, we call the Map() method, which maps the User object to the UserViewModel object. Furthermore, pay attention to a local method GetUserDetails that we use for the local data storage. You can find its implementation in our source code.

2

Asp.Net Core 2.2 with AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection.

public class MappingProfile : Profile
{
  public MappingProfile()
  {
      CreateMap<Domain, DomainDto>();
  }
}

In Startup.cs

services.AddAutoMapper(typeof(List.Handler));
1
  • What if I want to call CompileMappings*( on MapperConfiguration before calling AddAutoMapper? Commented Sep 14, 2020 at 7:32
1

services.AddAutoMapper(); didn't work for me. (I am using Asp.Net Core 2.0)

After configuring as below

   var config = new AutoMapper.MapperConfiguration(cfg =>
   {                 
       cfg.CreateMap<ClientCustomer, Models.Customer>();
   });

initialize the mapper IMapper mapper = config.CreateMapper();

and add the mapper object to services as a singleton services.AddSingleton(mapper);

this way I am able to add a DI to controller

  private IMapper autoMapper = null;

  public VerifyController(IMapper mapper)
  {              
   autoMapper = mapper;  
  }

and I have used as below in my action methods

  ClientCustomer customerObj = autoMapper.Map<ClientCustomer>(customer);
1
  • Hi @venkat you probably just needed to add the AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependancyInjection package to your project
    – dalcam
    Commented Sep 25, 2019 at 18:25
1

For AutoMapper 11.0.1 using .NET 7 I started getting this exception:

System.ArgumentException: 'GenericArguments[0], 'System.DateTime', on 'T MaxInteger[T](System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1[T])' violates the constraint of type 'T'.'

Inner Exception
VerificationException: Method System.Linq.Enumerable.MaxInteger: type argument 'System.DateTime' violates the constraint of type parameter 'T'.

See this question:

System.DateTime on 'T MaxInteger[T](System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable`1[T])' violates the constraint of type T for .NET 7 using AutoMapper 11.0.1

This meant that I could no longer use services.AddAutoMapper(typeof(MappingProfile).Assembly); without an exception.

For AutoMapper.Extensions.Microsoft.DependencyInjection I solved it like this:

services.AddAutoMapper(cfg => cfg.Internal().MethodMappingEnabled = false, typeof(MappingProfile).Assembly);

For Blazor WebAssembly client the solution looked like this:

var mapperConfig = new MapperConfiguration(mc =>
{
    //Needed for https://github.com/AutoMapper/AutoMapper/issues/3988
    mc.Internal().MethodMappingEnabled = false;
    mc.AddProfile(new MappingProfile());
});
//mapperConfig.AssertConfigurationIsValid();

IMapper mapper = mapperConfig.CreateMapper();
builder.Services.AddSingleton(mapper);
0

To add onto what Arve Systad mentioned for testing. If for whatever reason you're like me and want to maintain the inheritance structure provided in theutz solution, you can set up the MapperConfiguration like so:

var mappingProfile = new MappingProfile();
var config = new MapperConfiguration(cfg =>
{
    cfg.AddProfile(mappingProfile);
});
var mapper = new Mapper(config);

I did this in NUnit.

-2

About theutz answer, there is no need to specify the IMapper mapper parameter at the controllers constructor.

You can use the mapper as it is a static member at any place of the code.

public class UserController : Controller 
{
    public someMethod()
    {
        Mapper.Map<User, UserDto>(user);
    }
}
2
  • 11
    But statics are a bit anti-testable, no? Commented May 17, 2017 at 17:40
  • 3
    Yep. This will work in many cases, but if you have no configured mapping when invoking this method in a test, It'll throw an exception (and thus failing the test for the wrong reason). With an injected IMapper you can mock that and, for example, just make it return null if it's irrelevant for the given test. Commented May 29, 2017 at 20:48

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