232

I'm trying to support JWT bearer token (JSON Web Token) in my web API application and I'm getting lost.

I see support for .NET Core and for OWIN applications.
I'm currently hosting my application in IIS.

How can I achieve this authentication module in my application? Is there any way I can use the <authentication> configuration similar to the way I use forms/Windows authentication?

551

I answered this question: How to secure an ASP.NET Web API 4 years ago using HMAC.

Now, lots of things changed in security, especially JWT is getting popular. In here, I will try to explain how to use JWT in the simplest and basic way that I can, so we won't get lost from jungle of OWIN, Oauth2, ASP.NET Identity... :).

If you don't know JWT token, you need to take a look a little bit at:

https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7519

Basically, a JWT token looks like:

<base64-encoded header>.<base64-encoded claims>.<base64-encoded signature>

Example:

eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiIsInR5cCI6IkpXVCJ9.eyJ1bmlxdWVfbmFtZSI6ImN1b25nIiwibmJmIjoxNDc3NTY1NzI0LCJleHAiOjE0Nzc1NjY5MjQsImlhdCI6MTQ3NzU2NTcyNH0.6MzD1VwA5AcOcajkFyKhLYybr3h13iZjDyHm9zysDFQ

A JWT token has three sections:

  1. Header: JSON format which is encoded in Base64
  2. Claims: JSON format which is encoded in Base64.
  3. Signature: Created and signed based on Header and Claims which is encoded in Base64.

If you use the website jwt.io with the token above, you can decode the token and see it like below:

enter image description here

Technically, JWT uses signature which is signed from headers and claims with security algorithm specified in the headers (example: HMACSHA256). Therefore, JWT is required to be transferred over HTTPs if you store any sensitive information in claims.

Now, in order to use JWT authentication, you don't really need an OWIN middleware if you have a legacy Web Api system. The simple concept is how to provide JWT token and how to validate the token when the request comes. That's it.

Back to the demo, to keep JWT token lightweight, I only store username and expiration time in JWT. But this way, you have to re-build new local identity (principal) to add more information like: roles.. if you want to do role authorization. But, if you want to add more information into JWT, it's up to you: it's very flexible.

Instead of using OWIN middleware, you can simply provide a JWT token endpoint by using action from the controller:

public class TokenController : ApiController
{
    // This is naive endpoint for demo, it should use Basic authentication
    // to provide token or POST request
    [AllowAnonymous]
    public string Get(string username, string password)
    {
        if (CheckUser(username, password))
        {
            return JwtManager.GenerateToken(username);
        }

        throw new HttpResponseException(HttpStatusCode.Unauthorized);
    }

    public bool CheckUser(string username, string password)
    {
        // should check in the database
        return true;
    }
}

This is a naive action; in production you should use a POST request or a Basic Authentication endpoint to provide the JWT token.

How to generate the token based on username?

You can use the NuGet package called System.IdentityModel.Tokens.Jwt from Microsoft to generate the token, or even another package if you like. In the demo, I use HMACSHA256 with SymmetricKey:

/// <summary>
/// Use the below code to generate symmetric Secret Key
///     var hmac = new HMACSHA256();
///     var key = Convert.ToBase64String(hmac.Key);
/// </summary>
private const string Secret = "db3OIsj+BXE9NZDy0t8W3TcNekrF+2d/1sFnWG4HnV8TZY30iTOdtVWJG8abWvB1GlOgJuQZdcF2Luqm/hccMw==";

public static string GenerateToken(string username, int expireMinutes = 20)
{
    var symmetricKey = Convert.FromBase64String(Secret);
    var tokenHandler = new JwtSecurityTokenHandler();

    var now = DateTime.UtcNow;
    var tokenDescriptor = new SecurityTokenDescriptor
    {
        Subject = new ClaimsIdentity(new[]
        {
            new Claim(ClaimTypes.Name, username)
        }),

        Expires = now.AddMinutes(Convert.ToInt32(expireMinutes)),

        SigningCredentials = new SigningCredentials(
            new SymmetricSecurityKey(symmetricKey), 
            SecurityAlgorithms.HmacSha256Signature)
    };

    var stoken = tokenHandler.CreateToken(tokenDescriptor);
    var token = tokenHandler.WriteToken(stoken);

    return token;
}

The endpoint to provide the JWT token is done. Now, how to validate the JWT when the request comes? In the demo I have built JwtAuthenticationAttribute which inherits from IAuthenticationFilter (more detail about authentication filter in here).

With this attribute, you can authenticate any action: you just have to put this attribute on that action.

public class ValueController : ApiController
{
    [JwtAuthentication]
    public string Get()
    {
        return "value";
    }
}

You can also use OWIN middleware or DelegateHander if you want to validate all incoming requests for your WebAPI (not specific to Controller or action)

Below is the core method from authentication filter:

private static bool ValidateToken(string token, out string username)
{
    username = null;

    var simplePrinciple = JwtManager.GetPrincipal(token);
    var identity = simplePrinciple.Identity as ClaimsIdentity;

    if (identity == null)
        return false;

    if (!identity.IsAuthenticated)
        return false;

    var usernameClaim = identity.FindFirst(ClaimTypes.Name);
    username = usernameClaim?.Value;

    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(username))
       return false;

    // More validate to check whether username exists in system

    return true;
}

protected Task<IPrincipal> AuthenticateJwtToken(string token)
{
    string username;

    if (ValidateToken(token, out username))
    {
        // based on username to get more information from database 
        // in order to build local identity
        var claims = new List<Claim>
        {
            new Claim(ClaimTypes.Name, username)
            // Add more claims if needed: Roles, ...
        };

        var identity = new ClaimsIdentity(claims, "Jwt");
        IPrincipal user = new ClaimsPrincipal(identity);

        return Task.FromResult(user);
    }

    return Task.FromResult<IPrincipal>(null);
}

The workflow is, using JWT library (NuGet package above) to validate JWT token and then return back ClaimsPrincipal. You can perform more validation like check whether user exists on your system and add other custom validations if you want. The code to validate JWT token and get principal back:

public static ClaimsPrincipal GetPrincipal(string token)
{
    try
    {
        var tokenHandler = new JwtSecurityTokenHandler();
        var jwtToken = tokenHandler.ReadToken(token) as JwtSecurityToken;

        if (jwtToken == null)
            return null;

        var symmetricKey = Convert.FromBase64String(Secret);

        var validationParameters = new TokenValidationParameters()
        {
            RequireExpirationTime = true,
            ValidateIssuer = false,
            ValidateAudience = false,
            IssuerSigningKey = new SymmetricSecurityKey(symmetricKey)
        };

        SecurityToken securityToken;
        var principal = tokenHandler.ValidateToken(token, validationParameters, out securityToken);

        return principal;
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        //should write log
        return null;
    }
}

If the JWT token is validated and the principal is return, you should build a new local identity and put more information into it to check role authorization.

Remember to add config.Filters.Add(new AuthorizeAttribute()); (default authorization) at global scope in order to prevent any anonymous request to your resources.

You can use Postman to test the demo:

Request token (naive as I mentioned above, just for demo):

GET http://localhost:{port}/api/token?username=cuong&password=1

Put JWT token in the header for authorized request, example:

GET http://localhost:{port}/api/value

Authorization: Bearer eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiIsInR5cCI6IkpXVCJ9.eyJ1bmlxdWVfbmFtZSI6ImN1b25nIiwibmJmIjoxNDc3NTY1MjU4LCJleHAiOjE0Nzc1NjY0NTgsImlhdCI6MTQ3NzU2NTI1OH0.dSwwufd4-gztkLpttZsZ1255oEzpWCJkayR_4yvNL1s

The demo is put in here: https://github.com/cuongle/WebApi.Jwt

  • 5
    Well explained by @Cuong Le but i like to add more: If you are using OWIN check the UseJwtBearerAuthentication available in Microsoft.Owin.Security.Jwt you can use this owin middleware on the WebAPI to validate every incoming request automatically. use the owin startup class to register the middleware – Jek Oct 27 '16 at 13:13
  • 5
    @AmirPopovich You don't need to set token on the response, token need to be stored somewhere else on the client side, for web, you can put in local storage, whenever you send HTTP request, put the token on the header. – cuongle Oct 27 '16 at 14:41
  • 6
    Wow this is the most simple explication I have seen in a long time. +100 if I could – gyozo kudor Mar 24 '17 at 10:08
  • 4
    @Homam: Sorry fro this late answer, the best way to generate is: var hmac = new HMACSHA256();var key = Convert.ToBase64String(hmac.Key); – cuongle Mar 24 '17 at 12:41
  • 3
    @CuongLe - Regarding this ` public const string Secret = "856FECBA3B06519C8DDDBC80BB080553"; // your symetric`, what is the best way to generate and store the secret? – xaisoft May 11 '17 at 15:35
9

I've managed to achieve it with minimal effort (just as simple as with ASP.NET Core).

For that I use OWIN Startup.cs file and Microsoft.Owin.Security.Jwt library.

In order for the app to hit Startup.cs we need to amend Web.config:

<configuration>
  <appSettings>
    <add key="owin:AutomaticAppStartup" value="true" />
    ...

Here's how Startup.cs should look:

using MyApp.Helpers;
using Microsoft.IdentityModel.Tokens;
using Microsoft.Owin;
using Microsoft.Owin.Security;
using Microsoft.Owin.Security.Jwt;
using Owin;

[assembly: OwinStartup(typeof(MyApp.App_Start.Startup))]

namespace MyApp.App_Start
{
    public class Startup
    {
        public void Configuration(IAppBuilder app)
        {
            app.UseJwtBearerAuthentication(
                new JwtBearerAuthenticationOptions
                {
                    AuthenticationMode = AuthenticationMode.Active,
                    TokenValidationParameters = new TokenValidationParameters()
                    {
                        ValidAudience = ConfigHelper.GetAudience(),
                        ValidIssuer = ConfigHelper.GetIssuer(),
                        IssuerSigningKey = ConfigHelper.GetSymmetricSecurityKey(),
                        ValidateLifetime = true,
                        ValidateIssuerSigningKey = true
                    }
                });
        }
    }
}

Many of you guys use ASP.NET Core nowadays, so as you can see it doesn't differ a lot from what we have there.

It really got me perplexed first, I was trying to implement custom providers, etc. But I didn't expect it to be so simple. OWIN just rocks!

Just one thing to mention - after I enabled OWIN Startup NSWag library stopped working for me (e.g. some of you might want to auto-generate typescript HTTP proxies for Angular app).

The solution was also very simple - I replaced NSWag with Swashbuckle and didn't have any further issues.


Ok, now sharing ConfigHelper code:

public class ConfigHelper
{
    public static string GetIssuer()
    {
        string result = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Issuer"];
        return result;
    }

    public static string GetAudience()
    {
        string result = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Audience"];
        return result;
    }

    public static SigningCredentials GetSigningCredentials()
    {
        var result = new SigningCredentials(GetSymmetricSecurityKey(), SecurityAlgorithms.HmacSha256);
        return result;
    }

    public static string GetSecurityKey()
    {
        string result = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SecurityKey"];
        return result;
    }

    public static byte[] GetSymmetricSecurityKeyAsBytes()
    {
        var issuerSigningKey = GetSecurityKey();
        byte[] data = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(issuerSigningKey);
        return data;
    }

    public static SymmetricSecurityKey GetSymmetricSecurityKey()
    {
        byte[] data = GetSymmetricSecurityKeyAsBytes();
        var result = new SymmetricSecurityKey(data);
        return result;
    }

    public static string GetCorsOrigins()
    {
        string result = System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["CorsOrigins"];
        return result;
    }
}

Another important aspect - I sent JWT Token via Authorization header, so typescript code looks for me as follows:

(the code below is generated by NSWag)

@Injectable()
export class TeamsServiceProxy {
    private http: HttpClient;
    private baseUrl: string;
    protected jsonParseReviver: ((key: string, value: any) => any) | undefined = undefined;

    constructor(@Inject(HttpClient) http: HttpClient, @Optional() @Inject(API_BASE_URL) baseUrl?: string) {
        this.http = http;
        this.baseUrl = baseUrl ? baseUrl : "https://localhost:44384";
    }

    add(input: TeamDto | null): Observable<boolean> {
        let url_ = this.baseUrl + "/api/Teams/Add";
        url_ = url_.replace(/[?&]$/, "");

        const content_ = JSON.stringify(input);

        let options_ : any = {
            body: content_,
            observe: "response",
            responseType: "blob",
            headers: new HttpHeaders({
                "Content-Type": "application/json", 
                "Accept": "application/json",
                "Authorization": "Bearer " + localStorage.getItem('token')
            })
        };

See headers part - "Authorization": "Bearer " + localStorage.getItem('token')

  • I replaced NSWag with Swashbuckle and didn't have any further issues. Does Swashbuckle have the capability to generate typescript files or is that something you added to it yourself? – crush Feb 22 at 22:50
  • @crush swashbucle is a backend library providing json, like nuget nswag library only better. In order to produce typescript file you should still use nswag package from npm. – Alex Herman Feb 23 at 17:42
  • Right, I already have swashbuckle in my project for sometime, it sounded like you were suggesting it could generate the TypeScript models instead of nswag. I'm not a fan of nswag...it's heavy. I've created my own C#->TypeScript conversion that is hooked into Swashbuckle - generates the files as a post-build process, and publishes them to an npm feed for our projects. I just wanted to make sure I hadn't overlooked a Swashbuckle project that was already doing the same thing. – crush Feb 23 at 18:51
4

Here's a very minimal and secure implementation of a Claims based Authentication using JWT token in an ASP.NET Core Web API.

first of all, you need to expose an endpoint that returns a JWT token with claims assigned to a user:

 /// <summary>
        /// Login provides API to verify user and returns authentication token.
        /// API Path:  api/account/login
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="paramUser">Username and Password</param>
        /// <returns>{Token: [Token] }</returns>
        [HttpPost("login")]
        [AllowAnonymous]
        public async Task<IActionResult> Login([FromBody] UserRequestVM paramUser, CancellationToken ct)
        {

            var result = await UserApplication.PasswordSignInAsync(paramUser.Email, paramUser.Password, false, lockoutOnFailure: false);

            if (result.Succeeded)
            {
                UserRequestVM request = new UserRequestVM();
                request.Email = paramUser.Email;


                ApplicationUser UserDetails = await this.GetUserByEmail(request);
                List<ApplicationClaim> UserClaims = await this.ClaimApplication.GetListByUser(UserDetails);

                var Claims = new ClaimsIdentity(new Claim[]
                                {
                                    new Claim(JwtRegisteredClaimNames.Sub, paramUser.Email.ToString()),
                                    new Claim(UserId, UserDetails.UserId.ToString())
                                });


                //Adding UserClaims to JWT claims
                foreach (var item in UserClaims)
                {
                    Claims.AddClaim(new Claim(item.ClaimCode, string.Empty));
                }

                var tokenHandler = new JwtSecurityTokenHandler();
                  // this information will be retrived from you Configuration
                //I have injected Configuration provider service into my controller
                var encryptionkey = Configuration["Jwt:Encryptionkey"];
                var key = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(encryptionkey);
                var tokenDescriptor = new SecurityTokenDescriptor
                {
                    Issuer = Configuration["Jwt:Issuer"],
                    Subject = Claims,

                // this information will be retrived from you Configuration
                //I have injected Configuration provider service into my controller
                    Expires = DateTime.UtcNow.AddMinutes(Convert.ToDouble(Configuration["Jwt:ExpiryTimeInMinutes"])),

                    //algorithm to sign the token
                    SigningCredentials = new SigningCredentials(new SymmetricSecurityKey(key), SecurityAlgorithms.HmacSha256Signature)

                };

                var token = tokenHandler.CreateToken(tokenDescriptor);
                var tokenString = tokenHandler.WriteToken(token);

                return Ok(new
                {
                    token = tokenString
                });
            }

            return BadRequest("Wrong Username or password");
        }

now you need to Add Authentication to your services in your ConfigureServices inside your startup.cs to add JWT authentication as your default authentication service like this:

services.AddAuthentication(x =>
            {
                x.DefaultAuthenticateScheme = JwtBearerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme;
                x.DefaultChallengeScheme = JwtBearerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme;
            })
             .AddJwtBearer(cfg =>
             {
                 cfg.RequireHttpsMetadata = false;
                 cfg.SaveToken = true;
                 cfg.TokenValidationParameters = new TokenValidationParameters()
                 {
                     //ValidateIssuerSigningKey = true,
                     IssuerSigningKey = new SymmetricSecurityKey(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(configuration["JWT:Encryptionkey"])),
                     ValidateAudience = false,
                     ValidateLifetime = true,
                     ValidIssuer = configuration["Jwt:Issuer"],
                     //ValidAudience = Configuration["Jwt:Audience"],
                     //IssuerSigningKey = new SymmetricSecurityKey(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(Configuration["JWT:Key"])),
                 };
             });

now you can add policies to your authorization services like this:

services.AddAuthorization(options =>
            {
                options.AddPolicy("YourPolicyNameHere",
                                policy => policy.RequireClaim("YourClaimNameHere"));
            });

ALTERNATIVELY, You can also (not necessary) populate all of your claims from your database as this will only run once on your application startup and add them to policies like this:

  services.AddAuthorization(async options =>
            {
                var ClaimList = await claimApplication.GetList(applicationClaim);
                foreach (var item in ClaimList)
                {                        
                    options.AddPolicy(item.ClaimCode, policy => policy.RequireClaim(item.ClaimCode));                       
                }
            });

now you can put the Policy filter on any of the methods that you want to be authorized like this:

 [HttpPost("update")]
        [Authorize(Policy = "ACC_UP")]
        public async Task<IActionResult> Update([FromBody] UserRequestVM requestVm, CancellationToken ct)
        {
//your logic goes here
}

Hope this helps

1

I think you should use some 3d party server to support the JWT token and there is no out of the box JWT support in WEB API 2.

However there is an OWIN project for supporting some format of signed token (not JWT). It works as a reduced OAuth protocol to provide just a simple form of authentication for a web site.

You can read more about it e.g. here.

It's rather long, but most parts are details with controllers and ASP.NET Identity that you might not need at all. Most important are

Step 9: Add support for OAuth Bearer Tokens Generation

Step 12: Testing the Back-end API

There you can read how to set up endpoint (e.g. "/token") that you can access from frontend (and details on the format of the request).

Other steps provide details on how to connect that endpoint to the database, etc. and you can chose the parts that you require.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.