177

Okay so here's the deal, I've been googling for ages to find a solution to this and while there are many out there, they don't seem to do the job I'm looking for.

Basically I have an array structured like this

["item 1", "item 2", "item 3", "item 4"] 

I want to convert this to a Hash so it looks like this

{ "item 1" => "item 2", "item 3" => "item 4" }

i.e. the items that are on the 'even' indexes are the keys and the items on the 'odd' indexes are the values.

Any ideas how to do this cleanly? I suppose a brute force method would be to just pull out all the even indexes into a separate array and then loop around them to add the values.

341
a = ["item 1", "item 2", "item 3", "item 4"]
h = Hash[*a] # => { "item 1" => "item 2", "item 3" => "item 4" }

That's it. The * is called the splat operator.

One caveat per @Mike Lewis (in the comments): "Be very careful with this. Ruby expands splats on the stack. If you do this with a large dataset, expect to blow out your stack."

So, for most general use cases this method is great, but use a different method if you want to do the conversion on lots of data. For example, @Łukasz Niemier (also in the comments) offers this method for large data sets:

h = Hash[a.each_slice(2).to_a]
  • 8
    @tester, the * is called the splat operator. It takes an array and converts it a literal list of items. So *[1,2,3,4] => 1, 2, 3, 4. In this example, the above is equivalent to doing Hash["item 1", "item 2", "item 3", "item 4"]. And Hash has a [] method that accepts a list of arguments (making even indexes keys and odd indexes values), but Hash[] does not accept an array, so we splat the array using *. – Ben Lee Dec 5 '12 at 20:12
  • 13
    Be very careful with this. Ruby expands splats on the stack. If you do this with a large dataset, expect to blow out your stack. – Mike Lewis Feb 28 '13 at 18:48
  • 8
    On big data tables you can use Hash[a.each_slice(2).to_a]. – Hauleth Jul 22 '13 at 22:42
  • 3
    What does "blow out your stack" mean? – Kevin Mar 12 '14 at 22:48
  • 5
    @Kevin, the stack uses a small area of memory that the program allocates and reserves for certain specific operations. Most commonly, it is used to keep a stack of the methods that have been called so far. This is the origin of the term stack trace, and this is also why an infinitely recursive method can cause a stack overflow. The method in this answer also uses the stack, but since the stack is only a small area of memory, if you try this method with a large array, it will fill up the stack and cause an error (an error along the same lines as a stack overflow). – Ben Lee Mar 13 '14 at 0:02
93

Ruby 2.1.0 introduced a to_h method on Array that does what you require if your original array consists of arrays of key-value pairs: http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-2.1.0/Array.html#method-i-to_h.

[[:foo, :bar], [1, 2]].to_h
# => {:foo => :bar, 1 => 2}
  • 1
    Beautiful! Much better than some of the other solutions here. – Dennis Jun 5 '14 at 19:57
  • 3
    for pre 2.1.0 ruby versions, you can use the Hash::[] method to get the similar results, as long as you have pairs of a nested array. so a =[[:foo, :1], [bar, 2]] --- Hash[a] => {:foo=>1, :bar=>2} – AfDev Dec 22 '14 at 15:39
  • @AfDev, indeed, thanks. You're correct (when ignoring the minor typos: bar needs to be a symbol, and the symbol :2 should be an integer. So, your expression corrected is a = [[:foo, 1], [:bar, 2]]). – Jochem Schulenklopper Dec 23 '14 at 18:27
26

Just use Hash.[] with the values in the array. For example:

arr = [1,2,3,4]
Hash[*arr] #=> gives {1 => 2, 3 => 4}
  • 1
    what does [*arr] mean? – Alan Coromano Jul 17 '13 at 12:00
  • 1
    @Marius: *arr converts arr into an argument list, so this is calling the [] method of Hash with the contents of arr as arguments. – Chuck Jul 17 '13 at 18:21
24

Or if you have an array of [key, value] arrays, you can do:

[[1, 2], [3, 4]].inject({}) do |r, s|
  r.merge!({s[0] => s[1]})
end # => { 1 => 2, 3 => 4 }
  • 1
    You answer is not related to the question and in your case it's still much easier to use the same Hash[*arr] – Yossi Dec 11 '12 at 6:49
  • 2
    Nope. It would return { [1, 2] => [3, 4] }. And since the question's title says "Array to Hash" and the built-in "Hash to Array" method does: { 1 => 2, 3 => 4}.to_a # => [[1, 2], [3, 4]], I thought more than one could end here trying to get the inverse of the built-in "Hash to Array" method. Actually, that's how I ended here anyway. – Erik Escobedo Dec 11 '12 at 7:03
  • 1
    Sorry, I added a spare asterisk. Hash[arr] will do the job for you. – Yossi Dec 11 '12 at 7:09
  • 8
    IMHO better solution: Hash[*array.flatten(1)] – guest Mar 7 '13 at 12:27
  • 2
    Yossi: Sorry for raising the dead, but there is one bigger problem with his answer, and that is the use of #inject method. With #merge!, #each_with_object should have been used. If #inject is insisted upon, #merge rather than #merge! should have been used. – Boris Stitnicky Jun 1 '13 at 20:28
10

This is what I was looking for when googling this:

[{a: 1}, {b: 2}].reduce({}) { |h, v| h.merge v } => {:a=>1, :b=>2}

  • You don't want to use merge, it constructs and discards a new hash per loop iteration and is very slow. If you've got a array of hashes try [{a:1},{b:2}].reduce({}, :merge!) instead - it merges everything into the same (new) hash. – fennec Dec 5 '16 at 14:45
  • Thanks, this is what I wanted too! :) – Thanasis Petsas Dec 7 '16 at 1:14
7

Enumerator includes Enumerable. Since 2.1, Enumerable also has a method #to_h. That's why, we can write :-

a = ["item 1", "item 2", "item 3", "item 4"]
a.each_slice(2).to_h
# => {"item 1"=>"item 2", "item 3"=>"item 4"}

Because #each_slice without block gives us Enumerator, and as per the above explanation, we can call the #to_h method on the Enumerator object.

6

You could try like this, for single array

irb(main):019:0> a = ["item 1", "item 2", "item 3", "item 4"]
  => ["item 1", "item 2", "item 3", "item 4"]
irb(main):020:0> Hash[*a]
  => {"item 1"=>"item 2", "item 3"=>"item 4"}

for array of array

irb(main):022:0> a = [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
  => [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
irb(main):023:0> Hash[*a.flatten]
  => {1=>2, 3=>4}
5
a = ["item 1", "item 2", "item 3", "item 4"]
Hash[ a.each_slice( 2 ).map { |e| e } ]

or, if you hate Hash[ ... ]:

a.each_slice( 2 ).each_with_object Hash.new do |(k, v), h| h[k] = v end

or, if you are a lazy fan of broken functional programming:

h = a.lazy.each_slice( 2 ).tap { |a|
  break Hash.new { |h, k| h[k] = a.find { |e, _| e == k }[1] }
}
#=> {}
h["item 1"] #=> "item 2"
h["item 3"] #=> "item 4"
  • If you don't fully hate Hash[ ... ] but want to use it as a chained method (like you can do with to_h) you can combine Boris suggestions and write: arr.each_slice( 2 ).map { |e| e }.tap { |a| break Hash[a] } – b-studios Aug 17 '15 at 11:56
  • To make the semantics of the code above clearer: This will create a "lazy hash" h, which is initially empty, and will pull out elements from the original array a when needed. Only then will they actually be stored in h! – Daniel Werner Apr 11 '17 at 15:02

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