45

Let's say I have an array of integers defined like that:

static constexpr int IntArray[] = {1, 5, 10, 12, 17};

Is there a way to get the minimum or maximum value at compile time?

  • 6
    It might be possible to do it with recursive constexpr functions. – Some programmer dude Oct 27 '16 at 13:16
  • In C++ it might be possible to use template meta-programming to solve it. – vsz Oct 27 '16 at 19:23
64

Let's get the C++17 solution out of the way for future search-landers:

constexpr int IntArray[] = {1, 5, 10, 12, 17};
constexpr int min = *std::min_element(std::begin(IntArray), std::end(IntArray));
static_assert(min == 1);

C++11 is more picky with constexpr functions, so we have to roll out a recursive algorithm. This one is a simple, linear one:

template <class T>
constexpr T &constexpr_min(T &a, T &b) {
    return a > b ? b : a;
}

template <class T>
constexpr T &arrayMin_impl(T *begin, T *end) {
    return begin + 1 == end
        ? *begin
        : constexpr_min(*begin, arrayMin_impl(begin + 1, end));
}

template <class T, std::size_t N>
constexpr T &arrayMin(T(&arr)[N]) {
    return arrayMin_impl(arr, arr + N);
}

constexpr int IntArray[] = {1, 5, 10, 12, 17};
constexpr int min = arrayMin(IntArray);

See it live on Coliru

  • Here I am manually trying to implement a c++17 version and there i already one. :( But good to know. ;) – Hayt Oct 27 '16 at 13:35
  • 2
    This doesn't technically answer OPs question because you used a constexpr and not a static const – AndyG Oct 27 '16 at 14:13
  • 20
    @AndyG I assumed that it is an oversight. A const array's contents are not compile-time constants, so if it isn't actually constexpr, nothing can be done at compile-time at all. – Quentin Oct 27 '16 at 14:16
  • 3
    @Quentin: I wouldn't assume anything haha :-) I think the real answer is your second statement "Nothing can be done at compile-time at all" – AndyG Oct 27 '16 at 14:50
  • 2
    @AndyG ...and would you then recommend not including the info about the constexpr case, which is actually useful? – Kyle Strand Oct 27 '16 at 21:35

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