I have spotted buggy behavior in javascript es6 inheritance using Singleton pattern.

Code is:

let instanceOne = null;

class One {
    constructor() {
        if (instanceOne) return instanceOne;

        this.name = 'one';
        instanceOne = this;
        return instanceOne;
    }

    method() {
        console.log('Method in one');
    }
}


let instanceTwo = null;

class Two extends One {
    constructor() {
        super();

        if (instanceTwo) return instanceTwo;

        this.name = 'two';
        instanceTwo = this;
        return instanceTwo;
    }

    method() {
        console.log('Method in two');
    }
}

const objOne = new One();
const objTwo = new Two();

console.log(objOne.name);
console.log(objTwo.name);
objOne.method();
objTwo.method();

Display is:

two
two
Method in one
Method in one

The inheritance get fucked up somehow. Here the attributes get overridden but not the object methods.

My question is why is it working (like now throw) and can you explain this behavior?

It appears that new objects need brand new object as parent (see solution below).


If you encounter the same problem, here is my solution:

let instanceOne = null;

class One {
    constructor(brandNewInstance = false) {
        if (instanceOne && !brandNewInstance) return instanceOne;

        this.name = 'one';

        if (brandNewInstance) return this;

        instanceOne = this;
        return instanceOne;
    }

    method() {
        console.log('Method in one');
    }
}


let instanceTwo = null;

class Two extends One {
    constructor() {
        super(true);

        if (instanceTwo) return instanceTwo;

        this.name = 'two';
        instanceTwo = this;
        return instanceTwo;
    }

    method() {
        console.log('Method in two');
    }
}

I use node.js v6.9.1

  • 2
    Well, don't use singletons. instanceOne === instanceTwo is exactly what you'll get when you want only a single instance. Don't use inheritance for singletons objects. – Bergi Oct 27 '16 at 13:26
  • I think there is no theorical explaination about why inherit a singleton class is bad (To me Singleton pattern means you want to give access to functionnalities from only one canal). We shouldn't restaint ourselves because it result to a technical error. – Grégory NEUT Oct 27 '16 at 13:34
  • 2
    There is no technical error here, at most a programming mistake. The theoretical explanation is that singleton patterns are bad in general (they are global state), and your idea that a singleton would be implemented using a class is misguided (probably from languages that don't know anything else than classes). Just use a simple object (literal). You can even inherit from that in JS if you care to. – Bergi Oct 27 '16 at 13:38
  • Ok for the misguidance. I disagree about that the singleton are bad, for example you want to Log something, you don't need multiple instance of same class to attend the job. Thanks you for your time – Grégory NEUT Oct 27 '16 at 13:57
  • Well, then instantiate it only once (or make it one static object). But there's no point in putting that restriction onto the class itself. Btw, if you want only a single channel for your logs, how would that work with two instances (instanceOne and instanceTwo)? – Bergi Oct 27 '16 at 14:09
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are doing something a bit strange. Constructors and subclasses in ecmascript 6 do not work in the way you think they do. You may wish to read this blog post (particularly section 4) to learn more.

Taking from that article, your code looks like this under the hood:

let instanceOne = null;

function One() {
//  var this = Object.create(new.target.prototype);  // under the hood

    if (instanceOne) return instanceOne;

    this.name = 'one';
    instanceOne = this;
    return instanceOne;
}
One.prototype.method = function() { console.log('Method in one'); }

let instanceTwo = null;

function Two() {
    var that = undefined;

    that = Reflect.construct(One, [], new.target);

    if (instanceTwo) return instanceTwo;

    that.name = 'two';
    instanceTwo = that;
    return instanceTwo;
}
Two.prototype.method = function() { console.log('Method in two'); }
Object.setPrototypeOf(Two, One);
Object.setPrototypeOf(Two.prototype, One.prototype);

const objOne = Reflect.construct(One, [], One);
const objTwo = Reflect.construct(Two, [], Two);

console.log(objOne.name);
console.log(objTwo.name);
objOne.method();
objTwo.method();

(new.target is the value passed as the third argument of Reflect.construct)

You can see that for the Two class, no new object is being created and Two.prototype is not used. Instead, the One singleton instance is used and mutated.

  • So, are you saying that Two.prototype is not used because of the explicit return? I mean, wouldn't there normally be a step in the Two constructor to add Two.prototype on to that and then do another Object.create(that), on the augmented that, to construct the extended prototype chain? Because, according to the blog you referenced, you normally can supersede static methods when extending... – Cool Blue Oct 27 '16 at 22:31
  • 1
    @CoolBlue In ecmascript 6 the prototype chain is made backwards, sort of. The Two constructor passes a reference to the Two object to the One constructor. One constructor makes a new object whose prototype is new.target.prototype... which is Two. The prototype of Two is One, so the resultant object has the correct prototype chain. It's just that in the question, this object with the correct prototype chain is discarded, instead the instanceOne singleton is returned. – Oliver Oct 28 '16 at 7:27
  • Thanks @Oliver, but I'm still confused. 1. Your statement: "new.target is the value passed as the first argument of Reflect.construct" appears to be the opposite of the actual case. 2. You seem to be mixing code and pseudocode in the One constructor by using that when this is already doing the same thing under the hood. For me, this is confusing. 3. Shouldn't Object.setPrototypeOf(Two, One) be Object.setPrototypeOf(Two.prototype, One.prototype) for proper inheritance? – Cool Blue Oct 29 '16 at 6:59
  • @CoolBlue I suggest reading the linked article! (section 4). My answer just paraphrases it. 1) you're right, it should be 'third argument'. 2) it's not pseudocode as it executes correctly. I was trying to demonstrate what the underlying javascript engine was doing, and this is not assignable to. The point was to show what is going on under the hood. 3) No, because Two is a subclass of One: The prototype of a subclass is the superclass in ECMAScript 6. Again, read the linked article as it explains much better than I can. There are diagrams! – Oliver Oct 29 '16 at 11:35
  • I followed your suggestion and re-read the linked blog. Thanks to your explanation and the poking around in devtools that I did, my understanding is much better now. If you check out section 4.1 you will see that we are both right: in fact you need to add the line I suggested in point 3 above. As you said, the [[Prototype]] of a subclass is the superclass but, also, the [[Prototype]] of the prototype of the subclass is the prototype of the superclass. For point 2, I suggested an edit to your question that, to me anyway, is easier to understand. Please feel free to roll it back! – Cool Blue Oct 29 '16 at 12:43

This happens because of this line:

    if (instanceOne) return instanceOne;

One constructor runs twice in the code above. Second One call is super(), in this case this is created from Two.prototype, and object method is Two.prototype.method.

Return statement from super() substitutes this with One singleton, and then Two constructor just modifies One singleton instance.

Static property can be used instead to hold instances:

constructor() {
    if (this.constructor.hasOwnProperty('instance'))
        return this.constructor.instance;

    this.constructor.instance = this;

    this.name = 'one';
}

Or if sharing an instance with descendant classes is the expected behaviour,

constructor() {
    if ('instance' in this.constructor)
        return this.constructor.instance;

    this.name = 'one';
    this.constructor.instance = this;
}

In this case all singleton mechanics is done by One constructor, Two just needs to call super:

constructor() {
    super();

    this.name = 'two';
}

Also, ending return statement is redundant. this doesn't have to be returned explicitly.

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