2

I have a table called articles that contains data in the following format:

id|categories
--+----------
1|123,13,43
2|1,3,15
3|9,17,44,18,3

For testing purposes, you may create this table using the following SQL commands:

CREATE TABLE articles(id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, categories TEXT);
INSERT INTO articles VALUES(1, '123,13,43'), (2, '1,3,15'), (3, '9,17,44,18,3');

Now I would like to split the values of the categories column so that a table like the following one is the result:

id|category
--+--------
1|123
1|13
1|43
2|1
2|3
2|15
3|9
3|17
3|44
3|18
3|3

As you can see, I would like to bring the original table into the First normal form.

I already know how to split just one row in this way, from this answer. The following code example just takes the second row (i.e. the one where id=2) and splits them in the desired way:

WITH split(article_id, word, str, offsep) AS
(
    VALUES
    (
        2,
        '',
        (SELECT categories FROM articles WHERE id=2),
        1
    )
    UNION ALL
    SELECT
        article_id,
        substr(str, 0, CASE WHEN instr(str, ',') THEN instr(str, ',') ELSE length(str)+1 END),
        ltrim(substr(str, instr(str, ',')), ','),
        instr(str, ',')
        FROM split
        WHERE offsep
) SELECT article_id, word FROM split WHERE word!='';

Of course this is very unflexible, as the article ID needs to be hard-coded. So, now my question is: What do I have to add to or change in the upper SQLite code to make it operate on all rows and output the desired result?

  • Is it really have to be done in SQL (maybe 'yes', just verifying)? Can you do that on bash? – David דודו Markovitz Oct 27 '16 at 16:09
  • @DuduMarkovitz I don't think it would be very nice using bash... And I do this for fun/educational purposes anyway, so learning about an SQL way would be better. – sigalor Oct 27 '16 at 17:09
  • One liner awk would do the trick. There are many similar questions in this site. SQLite is not natural for this job. – David דודו Markovitz Oct 27 '16 at 17:10
3

After some playing around, I finally figured out the solution myself. It also takes care of rows that have '' or NULL as values for categories:

-- create temporary table which buffers the maximum article ID, because SELECT MAX can take a very long time on huge databases
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS max_article_id;
CREATE TEMP TABLE max_article_id(num INTEGER);
INSERT INTO max_article_id VALUES((SELECT MAX(id) FROM articles));

WITH RECURSIVE split(article_id, word, str, offsep) AS
(
    VALUES ( 0, '', '', 0 )                                      -- begin with dummy article 0 (which does not actually exist) to avoid code duplication
    UNION ALL
    SELECT
        CASE WHEN offsep==0 OR str IS NULL
            THEN article_id+1                                    -- go to next article if the current one is finished
            ELSE article_id                                      -- and keep the current one in the opposite case
        END,
        CASE WHEN offsep==0 OR str IS NULL
            THEN ''
            ELSE substr(str, 0, CASE WHEN instr(str, ',') THEN instr(str, ',') ELSE length(str)+1 END)
        END,
        CASE WHEN offsep==0 OR str IS NULL                       -- when str==NULL, then there has been a NULL value for the categories cell of the current article
            THEN (SELECT categories FROM articles WHERE id=article_id+1)
            ELSE ltrim(substr(str, instr(str, ',')), ',')
        END,
        CASE WHEN offsep==0 OR str IS NULL                       -- offsep==0 means that the splitting was finished in the previous iteration
            THEN 1                                               -- offsep==1 means that splitting the categories for a new article will begin in the next iteration
            ELSE instr(str, ',')                                 -- the actual string splitting stuff is explained and taken from here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/32051164
        END
        FROM split
        WHERE article_id<=(SELECT * FROM max_article_id)         -- stop getting new articles when the maximum article ID is reached
) SELECT article_id, word AS category FROM split WHERE word!=''; -- only select article_id and word from the result to use output the desired table layout
  • Thanks for this, worked very well, except sqlite seems to start indexes at 1 so I changed this line in setting the word: ELSE substr(str, 1, CASE WHEN instr(str, ',') THEN instr(str, ',') ELSE length(str)+1 END) – Eric G Oct 6 '17 at 20:23
0

Hi this might be a few years late, but I have a simpler solution using my revised answer in How to split comma-separated value in SQLite?

CREATE TABLE articles(id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, categories TEXT);
INSERT INTO articles VALUES(1, '123,13,43'), (2, '1,3,15'),
(3, '9,17,44,18,3'), (4, ''), (5, NULL);

WITH split(id, category, str) AS (
    SELECT id, '', categories||',' FROM articles
    UNION ALL SELECT id,
    substr(str, 0, instr(str, ',')),
    substr(str, instr(str, ',')+1)
    FROM split WHERE str
) SELECT id, category FROM split WHERE category ORDER BY id;

Output is as you expected:

id|category
1|123
1|13
1|43
2|1
2|3
2|15
3|9
3|17
3|44
3|18
3|3

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