5

As part of an experiment using custom stacks, I wanted a function to return the address of a stack allocated char buffer.

// return pointer to stack variable
void *foo(void)
{
    char sz[10] = "hello";
    return sz;
}

I know that it's illegal to do this in C, and gcc warns too.

gcc -Wall -Wextra -pedantic -std=gnu99 -fomit-frame-pointer -O0 -c foo.c 

foo.c:8:12: warning: function returns address of local variable [-Wreturn-local-addr]
     return sz;

Still, since this is part of an experiment, I want the code as is. The funny thing is that the generated code returns 0 instead of sz's stack address:

boa@localhost:~/tmp$ objdump -dMintel foo.o
0000000000000000 <foo>:
   0:   48 b8 68 65 6c 6c 6f    movabs rax,0x6f6c6c6568
   7:   00 00 00 
   a:   48 89 44 24 f0          mov    QWORD PTR [rsp-0x10],rax
   f:   66 c7 44 24 f8 00 00    mov    WORD PTR [rsp-0x8],0x0
  16:   b8 00 00 00 00          mov    eax,0x0
  1b:   c3                      ret    

As one can see, 0x0 is moved to eax, which is what puzzles me. Why does gcc do this?

Here's a complete source file with another function, bar(), as well as a main function. bar() returns the address as expected.

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>

// return pointer to stack variable
void *foo(void)
{
    char sz[10] = "hello";
    return sz;
}

void *bar(void)
{
    char sz[10] = "hello";
    intptr_t i = (intptr_t)sz;
    return (void*)i;
}

int main(void)
{
    printf("foo: %p\n", foo());
    printf("bar: %p\n", bar());
    return 0;
}

boa@localhost:~/tmp$ make foo && ./foo
cc   foo.o   -o foo
foo: (nil)
bar: 0x7ffce518a268

This is a mystery to me. What may be the logic behind gcc's choice?

  • Because it is optimized out. – Eugene Sh. Oct 27 '16 at 16:44
  • 1
    What version of gcc are you using? Under gcc 4.9.2, I get lea rax, [rsp-0x10] as the fourth instruction, not the mov you're seeing. – duskwuff -inactive- Oct 27 '16 at 16:50
  • 2
    I have seen comments somewhere, that NULL is returned so that dereferencing the pointer will fail predictably and not erratically. – Weather Vane Oct 27 '16 at 17:00
  • 2
    Assuming the behavior is deliberate (it may not be), you'd need to ask gcc's developers why they chose it. The thing about undefined behavior is that any result is allowed, and the result doesn't have to be consistent. – John Bode Oct 27 '16 at 17:01
  • 1
    Yes, I saw that question too. And last I saw, the OP had been convinced that what s/he was proposing was a bad idea. And the clincher was the interrupt. Interrupts can happen in any thread. – user3386109 Oct 27 '16 at 17:14
5

GCC deliberately returns NULL in this case as can be seen from the code:

tree zero = build_zero_cst (TREE_TYPE (val));
gimple_return_set_retval (return_stmt, zero);
update_stmt (stmt);

Newer versions of GCC and Clang exploit undefined behavior more aggressively so this check is not suprising. It also makes code fail fast which is a good thing in most cases (not yours, apparently).

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