10

For an OS class, I currently have to create a thread-safe queue in the linux kernel that one interacts with using syscalls.

Now for the critical sections my gut feeling is that I would want to use the mutex_lock and mutex_unlock functions in the mutex.h header. However, I was told that I could instead use a binary semaphore with down_interruptible and up in the semaphore.h header, and that it'd be better.

I've read through Difference between binary semaphore and mutex: From it, I understand that the main advantage of a mutex is how strongly it enforces ownership, and that the advantage of the semaphore is that since it doesn't enforce ownership you can use it as a synchronization mechanism between two (multiple?) different threads.

My question is what are the advantages of the binary semaphore, if you use it in exactly the same way as a mutex. More explicitly if I wrote:

down()
/* critical */
up()

in the same way that I would do

mutex_lock()
/* critical */
mutex_unlock()

Is there some performance advantage because it's less safe than a mutex? Am I missing something?


Here's a small snippet of the code that I want to make thread-safe if you want more context (this is my first C proj ever):

#define MESSAGE_MAX_SIZE 512

typedef struct list_head list_node;

/* Create message struct */
typedef struct {
  size_t size;
  list_node node;
  char data[MESSAGE_MAX_SIZE];
} Message;

/* Create the linked list queue with dummy head */
struct {
  size_t size;
  list_node head;
} my_q = { 0, LIST_HEAD_INIT(my_q.head) };

/*
  Adds a new item to the tail of the queue. 

  @data: pointer to data to add to list
  @len: size of the data
*/
asmlinkage long sys_enqueue(const void __user *data, long len) {
  long res = 0;
  Message *msg = 0; 

  if (len < 0) return EINVAL;
  if (len > MESSAGE_MAX_SIZE) return E2BIG;

  msg = kmalloc(sizeof(Message), GFP_KERNEL);
  if (msg == 0) return ENOMEM;

  res = copy_from_user(msg->data, data, len);
  if (res != 0) return EFAULT;

  /* Start Critical Section */

  my_q.size++;
  list_add_tail(&msg->node, &my_q.head);

  /* End Critical Section   */

  return 0;
}
  • Will your queue ever need recursive locking or have to deal with priority inversion? – Michael Dorgan Oct 27 '16 at 18:39
  • No for priority inversion, and I am pretty sure I won't need recursive locking either. – m0meni Oct 27 '16 at 18:41
  • 2
    Then at that point, I do think it comes down to performance. And when it is performance, the best thing to do is to profile both and see what happens. My gut feel is that if they perform roughly the same, I'd stick with a mutex, but others may have better answers for sure. – Michael Dorgan Oct 27 '16 at 18:43
  • @MichaelDorgan alright thanks a lot! I'm really new to this and wasn't sure if I was just missing something. I know your comment isn't necessarily enough to be answer, but I would love if you posted an answer that elaborated on how priority inversion and recursive locking would change things up, and I'd accept that. – m0meni Oct 27 '16 at 18:51
  • 2
    I will later today if no one else posts something better. The gist of recursive locking is that mutex supports that immediately and also can "usually" handle prio inversion while simpler constructs "usually" do not. Basically, it then becomes, RTFM on the function/methods to be sure. – Michael Dorgan Oct 27 '16 at 18:56
11

In absence of empirical evidence, I'd quote from the book Linux Kernel Development

It (i.e. mutex) behaves similar to a semaphore with a count of one, but it has a simpler interface, more efficient performance, and additional constraints on its use.

Additionally, there are many constraints that apply to mutexes but not to semaphores. Things like process cannot exit while holding a mutex. Moreover, if CONFIG_DEBUG_MUTEXES kernel option is enabled, then all the constraints that apply on mutexes are ensured by debugging checks.

So, unless there is a good reason not to use mutex, that should be first choice.

  • 3
    I will go by this as well. – Michael Dorgan Oct 27 '16 at 20:32
5

The default locking primitive is the spinlock. Mutexes only make sense if you need to sleep while holding the lock, which you definitely don't in the aforementioned code sample.

#define MESSAGE_MAX_SIZE 512

typedef struct list_head list_node;

Why?

/* Create message struct */
typedef struct {
  size_t size;
  list_node node;
  char data[MESSAGE_MAX_SIZE];
} Message;

Weird order, the node pointer should either be first or last.

/* Create the linked list queue with dummy head */
struct {
  size_t size;
  list_node head;
} my_q = { 0, LIST_HEAD_INIT(my_q.head) };

/*
  Adds a new item to the tail of the queue. 

  @data: pointer to data to add to list
  @len: size of the data
*/
asmlinkage long sys_enqueue(const void __user *data, long len) {

The curly bracket should be on the next line. Why is the length of signed type?

  long res = 0;
  Message *msg = 0; 

Why are you initializing these her and why are you setting the pointer to 0 as opposed to NULL?

  if (len < 0) return EINVAL;

The return statement should be on the next line. Also note this condition would not be relevant if the type was unsigned to begin with.

  if (len > MESSAGE_MAX_SIZE) return E2BIG;

  msg = kmalloc(sizeof(Message), GFP_KERNEL);

Why not sizeof(*msg)

  if (msg == 0) return ENOMEM;

  res = copy_from_user(msg->data, data, len);
  if (res != 0) return EFAULT;

This leaks msg.

  /* Start Critical Section */

  my_q.size++;
  list_add_tail(&msg->node, &my_q.head);

  /* End Critical Section   */

  return 0;
}
  • 1
    It's not a "personal opinion" but conformance with existing linux kernel coding guidelines, which you are violating for no apparent reason. What you should do with regards to your actual question was explained in first 2 sentences. Good luck with your attitude. – employee of the month Oct 27 '16 at 21:30
  • 1
    I'm sorry if I came off as dismissive. By personal opinion I meant style, which since it's just my own project that I'm not contributing to the kernel, I didn't feel was important. As for the list_head -> list_node typedef it's because list_head was such an unintuitive name to me. As for stuff like signed variables, those are the signatures I was assigned to work with so I kept them. As for the memory leak, I do call kfree() in a dequeue function that I don't have posted here. I prefer 0 to NULL since they're the same thing. One question: why should the node be first in the message struct? – m0meni Oct 27 '16 at 21:41
  • I've removed my downvote as well. I guess I was just annoyed by the unsolicited code review, and wished you had elaborated more on the first lines you had written such as when it is actually necessary to sleep instead of just spinlock. – m0meni Oct 27 '16 at 21:44
  • 2
    You are leaking allocated memory if copy_from_user fails. Locking in general is a rather nuanced subject and you were going in the wrong (or rather, weird here) direction. Now that you got the better keyword (spinlock), you know what to google for or better yet ask whoever is lecturing you. Formatting was about doing things right - when you write code for given codebase, you stick to conventions in said codebase. – employee of the month Oct 27 '16 at 21:58
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    It does have to, but right now you separate the buffer from its length by the list pointer, which does not make sense. Since you dequeue the object on read, you can just remove it from the list first, and then you can copy to userspace without holding any locks as the object is not visible to anyone else. – employee of the month Oct 28 '16 at 1:49

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