In Java it is possible to create dynamic proxies using an implementation of InvocationHandler. Despite JVM optimizations, using reflection will always have some overhead invoking a method.

To try to solve this problem, I tried to use ByteBuddy to create the proxy classes at runtime, but the documentation didn't seem clear enough on this aspect.

How do I create a MethodCallProxy in order to forward a method invocation to some class instance?

Edit:

To better clarify my problem, I am providing an example of what I want to achieve:

I am building an RPC system. On each side of a method invocation, I have an interface defining the contract (when both caller/callee are running under the JVM).

@Contract
interface ISomeService {
    fun someMethod(arg0: String, arg1: SomePojo): PojoResult
}

At the call site, I inject a proxy that intercepts all method calls and forwards them to the callee.

ByteBuddy()
    .subclass(Any::class.java)
    .implement(serviceClass)

    // Service contract method delegation
    .method(isDeclaredBy(serviceClass)).intercept(
      MethodDelegation
          .to(ServiceProxyInterceptor())
          .filter(not(isDeclaredBy(Any::class.java)))
    )

    .make()
    .load(this)
    .loaded as Class<T>

And, finally, at the callee, I have several handlers, one for each service method, responsible for unmarshalling the invocation parameters and forwarding them to the service implementation.

@Service
class SomeServiceImpl {
    fun someMethod(arg0: String, arg1: SomePojo): PojoResult {
        // ...
    }
}

I could solve this problem using code generation, but the resulting jar file can become very big. Thus, I want to create a generic version of these handlers and, in each instance, attach a proxy that intercepts every method call to ISomeService and forwards them to SomeServiceImpl.

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are many ways of creating proxy classes in Byte Buddy. The exact way depends on your use-case. The easiest way might be to use the InvocationHandlerAdapter. Given that you want to create a proxy for SomeClass, you can create one using:

Class<? extends SomeClass> proxy = new ByteBuddy()
  .subclass(SomeClass.class)
  .method(ElementMatchers.any())
  .intercept(InvocationHandlerAdapter.of(invocationHandler))
  .make()
  .load(SomeClass.class.getClassLoader());

If you want to create a proxy with a delegate to different instance, you would additionally define a field. This can be done by the following instructions:

Class<? extends SomeClass> proxy = new ByteBuddy()
  .subclass(SomeClass.class)
  .defineField("handler", InvocationHandler.class, Visibility.PUBLIC)
  .method(ElementMatchers.any())
  .intercept(InvocationHandlerAdapter.toField("handler"))
  .make()
  .load(SomeClass.class.getClassLoader());

You would set the above field via reflection or by implementing a setter interface such as for example:

interface HandlerSetter {
  InvocationHandler getHandler();
  void setHandler(InvocationHandler handler);
}

Class<? extends SomeClass> proxy = new ByteBuddy()
  .subclass(SomeClass.class)
  .defineField("handler", InvocationHandler.class, Visibility.PUBLIC)
  .implement(HandlerSetter.class)
  .intercept(FieldAccessor.ofField("handler"))
  .method(ElementMatchers.any())
  .intercept(InvocationHandlerAdapter.toField("handler"))
  .make()
  .load(SomeClass.class.getClassLoader());

You can now instantiate the class and cast the class to the interface for setting the handler.

Beyond the InvocationHandler, there are many other ways to create a proxy. One way would be using MethodDelegation which is more flexible, often faster and allows you to invoke a super method on demand. A forwarding insrumentation can also be applied using a MethodCall or a Forwarding instrumentation. You can find detailed information in the respective classes javadoc.

  • Of course, to address that specific part of the question, there is no reason to assume that a ByteBuddy generated proxy calling an InvocationHandler is more efficient that a JRE generated java.lang.reflect.Proxy calling an InvocationHandler – Holger Oct 28 '16 at 14:42
  • The difference is mostly that the JVM only supports interfaces whereas Byte Buddy can also instrument classes. I think the performance aspect indicated the benefits of code generation over reflection. The latter is however doubtful. For the most, I see reflection inflation to suffice. – Rafael Winterhalter Oct 28 '16 at 15:48
  • 1
    At runtime, there is no vararg. Simply provide the above method with a single array as an argument but cast it to Object. I could overload the method, but even then, the call would be ambiguous. Let me think how I can improve this! – Rafael Winterhalter Oct 28 '16 at 21:26
  • 1
    Maybe, I got it wrong, but I read the OP’s description as having an issue with withAllArguments(), not with the method with(Object...). Further, the varargs nature of a method is detectable at runtime… – Holger Oct 31 '16 at 12:50
  • 1
    @RafaelWinterhalter I see. I didn't know about reflection inflation either. Also, I wasn't aware boxing and unboxing had a sensible overhead. If it ever becomes a problem, I can change the impl to generate the handler bytecode in order to avoid it. – EdMelo Nov 1 '16 at 17:04

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