21

I just started to learn Decorator Design Pattern, unfortunately i had to go through various refrences to understand the Decorator pattern in a better manner which led me in great confusion. so, as far as my understanding is concern, i believe this is a decorator pattern

interface IComponent
{
    void Operation();
}
class Component : IComponent
{
    public void Operation()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("I am walking ");
    }
}
class DecoratorA : IComponent
{
    IComponent component;
    public DecoratorA(IComponent c)
    {
        component = c;
    }
    public void Operation()
    {
        component.Operation();
        Console.WriteLine("in the rain");
    }
}
class DecoratorB : IComponent
{
    IComponent component;
    public DecoratorB(IComponent c)
    {
        component = c;
    }
    public void Operation()
    {
        component.Operation();
        Console.WriteLine("with an umbrella");
    }
}
class Client
{
    static void Main()
    {
        IComponent component = new Component();
        component.Operation();

        DecoratorA decoratorA = new DecoratorA(new Component());
        component.Operation();

        DecoratorB decoratorB = new DecoratorB(new Component());
        component.Operation();

        Console.Read();
    }
 }

But can the below code also be Decorator Pattern?

class Photo
{
    public void Draw()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("draw a photo");
    }
}
class BorderedPhoto : Photo
{
    public void drawBorder()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("draw a border photo");
    }
}
class FramePhoto : BorderedPhoto
{
    public void frame()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("frame the photo");
    }
}
class Client
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Photo p = new Photo();
        p.Draw();

        BorderedPhoto b = new BorderedPhoto();
        b.Draw();
        b.drawBorder();

        FramePhoto f = new FramePhoto();
        f.Draw();
        f.drawBorder();
        f.frame();
    }
}

My Understanding

From the second example given by me, we can call all the three methods, but from the first example i wont be able to get access to all the three methods by creating a single object.

  • 1
    1 - decorator, 2 - not. From my point, decorator should wrap decorated object :) – tym32167 Oct 27 '16 at 21:44
  • 1
    decorator is suppose to extend the methods, right!!!. then why the second one is not a Decorator Pattern? Could you help me understand? – Lijin Durairaj Oct 27 '16 at 21:46
  • 3
    @LijinJohn I would say it's because a decorator decorates an existing instance. If I already have an instance of Photo, I can't simply decorate it by using BorderedPhoto, I'd have to create an instance of BorderedPhoto and then copy properties from my original Photo instance. That's not decorating. – Kyle Oct 27 '16 at 21:56
  • 1
    If you go here [sourcemaking.com/design_patterns], read the "Criticism" section. Specifically, Under ideal factoring, a concept should not be copied, but merely referenced. But if something is referenced instead of copied, then there is no "pattern" to label and catalog.. . . .Lets say I have a class A. class A { public A (B contained){} }. . .and A may expose modified behavior of B. It is also decorator. No, not proxy. Proxy must create class B within itself by definition. So, my point is, the patterns you read about are classic implementations but feel free to interpret it. – T.S. Oct 29 '16 at 0:55
  • @T.S. thank you very much for the explanantion :) – Lijin Durairaj Oct 29 '16 at 10:26
41

It should be a comment, but I have too many words.

For example, you have an object and interface, like Repository : IRepository.

public interface IRepository
{
    void SaveStuff();
}

public class Repository : IRepository
{
    public void SaveStuff()
    {
        // save stuff   
    }
}

and client, which probably was written by someone else

class RepoClient
{
    public void DoSomething(IRepository repo)
    {
        //...
        repo.SaveStuff();
    }
}

And once you decided, that ALL calls to repository should be logged. But you have a problem: the Repository class is from an external library and you don't want to change that code. So you need to extend the Repository's behavior that you use. You write RepositoryLogDecorator : IRepository, and inside on each method do the logging, like

public class RepositoryLogDecorator  : IRepository
{
    public IRepository _inner;

    public RepositoryLogDecorator(IRepository inner)
    {
        _inner = inner;
    }

    public void SaveStuff()
    {
        // log enter to method
        try
        {
            _inner.SaveStuff();
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            // log exception
        }       
        // log exit to method
    }
}

So, before you could use client as

var client = new RepoClient();
client.DoSomething(new Repository());

but now you can use

var client = new RepoClient();
client.DoSomething(new RepositoryLogDecorator(new Repository()));

Note, that this is a very simple example. In real projects, where object created primary with DI container, you will be able to use decorator by changing some config.

So, decorator is used to extend functionality of object without changing object or client.

Another benefit of decorator: your decorator does not depend on Repository implementation. Only depends from an interface IRepository. Why this is an advantage? If somehow you decide to write you own implementation of IRepository

public class MyAwesomeRepository : IRepository
{
    public void SaveStuff()
    {
        // save stuff, but AWESOME!
    }
}

you will be able to automatically decorate this with decorator, which already exist

var client = new RepoClient();
client.DoSomethig(new RepositoryLogDecorator(new MyAwesomeRepository()));

Want to see example from real software? (just as sample, code is ugly, I know) => go here

10

There is this PatternCraft series on Youtube that explains Design Patterns with Starcraft, you should check the video about Decorators here.

In the video above the author gives an example with a Marine and WeaponUpgrade.

In the game you will have a Marine and then you can upgrade its weapon:

marine = new WeaponUpgrade(marine);

Note that you still have a marine there, it is not a new unit, it is the same unit with things that modifies its attributes.

public class MarineWeaponUpgrade : IMarine
{
    private IMarine marine;

    public MarineWeaponUpgrade(IMarine marine)
    {
        this.marine = marine;
    }

    public int Damage
    {
        get { return this.marine.Damage + 1; } // here
        set { this.marine.Damage = value; }
    }
}

You do that by creating a class that implements the same interface as your unit and access your unit properties to modify values.

There is a Kata on CodeWars challenging you to complete the Weapon and Armor decorators for a marine.

  • thankyou for your youtube link, the videos were helpful :) – Lijin Durairaj Oct 27 '16 at 22:18
4

Per GOF page Decorator desing pattern:

Attach additional responsibilities to an object dynamically. Decorators provide a flexible alternative to subclassing for extending functionality.

In your second example you are using inheritance to extend behaviour of a class, I believe this is technically not a Decorator design pattern.

3

The decorator pattern allows you to add a specific behavior to an individual object of a given type without affecting other instances of that same type.

In your second example, which is normal inheritance, all instances of the class inherit the modified behavior.

0

The second example is not a decorate pattern, since an essential ingredient to decorator pattern is that the object accepts one of its kind and possibly enhance it.

An instances of this in the first example is

public DecoratorA(IComponent c) { component = c; }

Also, the goal of the decorator pattern is to create "one" object, then decorate it by passing it through different filters or decorators. Hence the line

DecoratorA decoratorA = new DecoratorA(new Component());

Should be

DecoratorA decoratorA = new DecoratorA(component );

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