93

I want to call a function inside some embedded html. I tried the following but the function isn't called. Would this be the incorrect way of calling a function inside a render method?

import React, { Component, PropTypes } from 'react';

export default class PatientTable extends Component {
      constructor(props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = { 
         checking:false
      };
        this.renderIcon = this.renderIcon.bind(this);
  }

  renderIcon(){
    console.log("came here")
    return(
      <div>Function called</div>
    )
  }

  render() {

   return (
       <div className="patient-container">

       {this.renderIcon}      

      </div>
   );
 }
}

3 Answers 3

141

To call the function you have to add ()

{this.renderIcon()}   
11
  • 3
    it depends on your need, u can use either this.renderIcon() or bind this.renderIcon.bind(this). is this correct? someone has written it below.
    – arora
    Mar 12, 2017 at 11:27
  • 4
    I would recommend NOT doing this. 1.) renderIcon is/should be a component. {this.renderIcon()} is not how you use components in React. 2.) Your render is the source of truth for what your component is rendering. Abstracting that adds additional complexity.
    – Galupuf
    Oct 18, 2019 at 14:34
  • 4
    For those of you interested in why this is generally and objectively a bad practice, please see this: kentcdodds.com/blog/dont-call-a-react-function-component It's worth mentioning that this answer is correct and does a great job of answering the posted question. I just think it's worth the effort of teaching people that if they find themselves writing code like this there is a reason NOT to do it.
    – Galupuf
    Dec 11, 2019 at 14:27
  • 1
    @Galupuf One reason that can justify doing it IMO is that for example you have a condition and dont want to use a nested ternary: myConditionalRender(){ if(loading) return <Loader /> if(error) return <Error /> return <MyComponent /> } and render(){ <div> ...more stuff ... {myConditionalRenderer()} }
    – jaycee
    Jan 18, 2021 at 0:15
  • 1
    Why not just put that condition in a component? It achieves the same things without any of the bad side effects
    – Galupuf
    Jan 22, 2021 at 17:52
19

class App extends React.Component {
  
  buttonClick(){
    console.log("came here")
    
  }
  
  subComponent() {
    return (<div>Hello World</div>);
  }
  
  render() {
    return ( 
      <div className="patient-container">
          <button onClick={this.buttonClick.bind(this)}>Click me</button>
          {this.subComponent()}
       </div>
     )
  }
  


}

ReactDOM.render(<App/>, document.getElementById('app'));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<div id="app"></div>

it depends on your need, u can use either this.renderIcon() or bind this.renderIcon.bind(this)

UPDATE

This is how you call a method outside the render.

buttonClick(){
    console.log("came here")
}

render() {
   return (
       <div className="patient-container">
          <button onClick={this.buttonClick.bind(this)}>Click me</button>
       </div>
   );
}

The recommended way is to write a separate component and import it.

1
  • 1
    this seems better since when you need to pass event or parameters this works Sep 25, 2018 at 12:43
3

The fix was at the accepted answer. Yet if someone wants to know why it worked and why the implementation in the SO question didn't work,

First, functions are first class objects in JavaScript. That means they are treated like any other variable. Function can be passed as an argument to other functions, can be returned by another function and can be assigned as a value to a variable. Read more here.

So we use that variable to invoke the function by adding parentheses () at the end.

One thing, If you have a function that returns a funtion and you just need to call that returned function, you can just have double paranthesis when you call the outer function ()().

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