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I understand worst case happens when the pivot is the smallest or the largest element. Then one of the partition is empty and we repeat the recursion for N-1 elements

But how it is calculated to O(N^2)

I have read couple of articles still not able to understand it fully.

Similarly, best case is when the pivot is the median of the array and the left and right part are of the same size. But, then how the value O(NlogN) is calculated

5 Answers 5

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I understand worst case happens when the pivot is the smallest or the largest element. Then one of the partition is empty and we repeat the recursion for N-1 elements.

So, imagine that you repeatedly pick the worst pivot; i.e. in the N-1 case one partition is empty and you recurse with N-2 elements, then N-3, and so on until you get to 1.

The sum of N-1 + N-2 + ... + 1 is (N * (N - 1)) / 2. (Students typically learn this in high-school maths these days ...)

O(N(N-1)/2) is the same as O(N^2). You can deduce this from first principles from the mathematical definition of Big-O notation.


Similarly, best case is when the pivot is the median of the array and the left and right part are of the same size. But, then how the value O(NlogN) is calculated.

That is a bit more complicated.

Think of the problem as a tree:

  • At the top level, you split the problem into two equal-sized sub problems, and move N objects into their correct partitions.

  • At the 2nd level. you split the two sub-problems into four sub-sub-problems, and in 2 problems you move N/2 objects into their correct partitions, for a total of N objects moved.

  • At the bottom level you have N/2 sub-problems of size 2 which you (notionally) split into N problems of size 1, again copying N objects.

Clearly, at each level you move N objects. The height of the tree for a problem of size N is log2N. So ... there are N * log2N object moves; i.e. O(N * log2)

But log2N is logeN * loge2. (High-school maths, again.)

So O(Nlog2N) is O(NlogN)

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Little correction to your statement:

I understand worst case happens when the pivot is the smallest or the largest element.

Actually, the worst case happens when each successive pivots are the smallest or the largest element of remaining partitioned array.

To better understand the worst case: Think about an already sorted array, which you may be trying to sort.

You select first element as first pivot. After comparing the rest of the array, you would find that the n-1 elements still are on the other end (rightside) and the first element remains at the same position, which actually totally beats the purpose of partitioning. These steps you would keep repeating till the last element with the same effect, which in turn would account for (n-1 + n-2 + n-3 + ... + 1) comparisons, and that sums up to (n*(n-1))/2 comparisons. So,

O(n*(n-1)/2) = O(n^2) for worst case.

To overcome this problem, it is always recommended to pick up each successive pivots randomly.

I would try to add explanation for average case as well.

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The best case can derived from the Master theorem. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_theorem for instance, or Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, and Stein: Introduction to Algorithms for a proof of the theorem.

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One way to think of it is the following.

If quicksort makes a poor choice for a pivot, then the pivot induces an unbalanced partition, with most of the elements being on one side of the pivot (either below or above). In an extreme case, you could have, as you suggest, that all elements are below or above the pivot. In that case we can model the time complexity of quicksort with the recurrence T(n)=T(1)+T(n-1)+O(n). However, T(1)=O(1), and we can write out the recurrence T(n)=O(n)+O(n-1)+...+O(1) = O(n^2). (One has to take care to understand what it means to sum Big-Oh terms.)

On the other hand, if quicksort repeatedly makes good pivot choices, then those pivots induce balanced partitions. In the best case, about half the elements will be below the pivot, and about half the elements above the pivot. This means we recurse on two subarrays of roughly equal sizes. The recurrence then becomes T(n)=T(n/2)+T(n/2)+O(n) = 2T(n/2)+O(n). (Here, too, one must take care about rounding the n/2 if one wants to be formal.) This solves to T(n)=O(n log n).

The intuition for the last paragraph is that we compute the relative position of the pivot in the sorted order without actually sorting the whole array. We can then compute the relative position of the pivot in the below subarray without having to worry about the elements from the above subarray; similarly for the above subarray.

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Firstly, paste a pseudo-code here:

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In my opinion, you need understand the two cases: the worst case & the best case.

  • The worst case: The most unbalanced partition occurs when the pivot divides the list into two sublists of sizes 0 and n−1. The complexity in recursively is T(n)=O(n)+T(0)+T(n-1)=O(n)+T(n-1). The master theorem tells that T(n)=O(n²).
  • The best case: In the most balanced case, each time we perform a partition we divide the list into two nearly equal pieces. The same as the worst, the recurrence relation is T(n)=O(n)+2T(n/2). And it can transform to T(n)=O(n logn).

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