5

I need to determine if a given Range object is actully an entire column OR entire row OR none of two.

What I do now is based on the next code which works for me.

If Range.Rows.Count = Range.EntireColumn.Rows.Count Then
...
ElseIf Range.Columns.Count = Range.EntireRow.Columns.Count Then
...
End If

I'd like to know if there's more efficient and/or elegant way of doing the same? Perhaps, some built-in property that I've overlooked?

UPD: I get the range from:

Worksheet.Range("NamedRange")

Thanks.

7
  • 2
    What you are doing is the best way, imo.
    – Alex K.
    Oct 28 '16 at 10:33
  • Please see my updated answer.
    – Miqi180
    Oct 28 '16 at 12:06
  • 2
    no built-in property that I know of, but I would save the max rows and columns in Long variables maxRows = Rows.Count
    – Slai
    Oct 28 '16 at 12:22
  • It might depend on the method that is used to get the range, if you can share that detail. Another micro-optimization can be to check if the Range.Row is 1
    – Slai
    Oct 28 '16 at 14:39
  • Thanks, @Slai. I've updated my question to show this.
    – hypers
    Oct 28 '16 at 15:33
3

This will work in all Excel versions:

Function cellsInRange(rng As Range) As Boolean

    Dim cellsInCol As Long, cellsInRow As Long, cols As Long, count As Long, rws As Long

    With ActiveSheet
        cellsInCol = .Columns("A").Cells.count
        cellsInRow = .Rows(1).Cells.count
    End With

    With rng
        cols = .Columns.count
        count = .Cells.count
        rws = .Rows.count
    End With

    If cols = 1 And count = cellsInCol Then
        cellsInRange = True
    ElseIf rws = 1 And count = cellsInRow Then
        cellsInRange = True
    End If

End Function

Edit

If more specific details are required about the range object, the following adaptation may prove useful:

Function cellsInRange(rng As Range) As String

    Dim cellsInCol As Long, cellsInRow As Long, cols As Long, count As Long, rws As Long

    With ActiveSheet
        cellsInCol = .Columns("A").Cells.count
        cellsInRow = .Rows(1).Cells.count
    End With

    With rng
        cols = .Columns.count
        count = .Cells.count
        rws = .Rows.count
    End With

    If cols = 1 And count = cellsInCol Then
        cellsInRange = "Single column"
    ElseIf rws = 1 And count = cellsInRow Then
        cellsInRange = "Single row"
    Else
        cellsInRange = "Neither single column nor single row"
    End If

End Function
2
  • Thanks for the answer. I imagine this has to be adapted a little bit to distinguish entire row and entire col. As of now it is just True if any.
    – hypers
    Oct 28 '16 at 11:56
  • 1
    In that case, just change the function to return a string instead of a boolean and insert appropriate response texts in the conditional statements. The logic is exactly the same.
    – Miqi180
    Oct 28 '16 at 11:58
2

Since I think the OP's own question contains a great answer (for most uses) and three years later no one has posted it, here it is. I converted the same logic into these two functions:

Function IsEntireRow(ByVal Target As Excel.Range) As Boolean
    IsEntireRow = Target.Columns.Count = Target.EntireRow.Columns.Count
End Function

Function IsEntireColumn(ByVal Target As Excel.Range) As Boolean
    IsEntireColumn = Target.Rows.Count = Target.EntireColumn.Rows.Count
End Function
0
1

you can use something like this:

Sub somethinglikethis()

    Dim rRange As Range

    Set rRange = Range("A:A")

    With rRange
        If .Rows.Count = 1048576 And .Columns.Count < 16384 Then
            Debug.Print "Range represents Column(s)"
        ElseIf .Rows.Count < 1048576 And .Columns.Count = 16384 Then
            Debug.Print "Range represents row(s)"
        ElseIf .Rows.Count = 1048576 And .Columns.Count = 16384 Then
            Debug.Print "Range represents whole sheet"
        Else
            Debug.Print "Range represents none of row(s) or column(s)"
        End If
    End With

End Sub

the amount of rows and columns are constants in excel (depending on Excel version): enter image description here

so, you just need to count the rows and columns in the range and compare these values with default values of rows and columns

4
  • Thanks for your answer. I think this would be an ideal solution for me if I'd keep the file for my own use. As I plan to distribute it to a number of users with different Excel versions I am too lazy to check their versions in the code. Will keep this as a backup though.
    – hypers
    Oct 28 '16 at 10:47
  • 1
    @hypers it's is not a big deal to check the version and assign variables for next comparing, just one row of code (if application.Version > ... or just a if [A:A].rows.count then = ...) will give you the way, but of course, it is on your own... Oct 28 '16 at 10:54
  • 1
    @hypers the number depends on the file type, not on the Excel version. It can even change in the same method if the workbook is saved to a newer or older format.
    – Slai
    Oct 28 '16 at 12:50
  • @Slai it's not a big deal also to check the file type, my answer is not a solution, it's just one of the possible directions... just my thoughts... I've never faced with such kind of tasks (define what the range is column or row) and I also can't imagine where such kind of tasks can be required... asume that such kind of things is redundancy code, but again, this is just thoughts... Oct 28 '16 at 14:21
1

You may be able to parse rng.Address(0,0); in English (rather than VBA):

s = rng.Address(0,0)
If s contains no letters then rng contains only full rows
If s contains no numbers then rng contains only full columns
2
  • Thanks for your pseudo-code. Initially I was thinking in same direction. But then I decided I was better off without Regexp or other string manipulation for this task.
    – hypers
    Oct 28 '16 at 12:39
  • 2
    @hypers My post was just food for thought Oct 28 '16 at 12:44
1

my 0,02 cents

Select Case rng.Address
    Case rng(1).EntireColumn.Address
        MsgBox "column"
    Case rng(1).EntireRow.Address
        MsgBox "row"
End Select

where rng is a variable of Range type

1
  • Thanks for your version. It seems to be not bad. However, it is a bit slower than my initial approach. A quick test (at my PC) showed that my version took about 4,96s (for 1mio iterations), while yours took near 8,33s.
    – hypers
    Oct 28 '16 at 14:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.