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I have a program that accepts a set of mutually exclusive flags that can be used to select some behavior. Let's say the flags are --csv, --xml and --json to select CSV, XML and JSON as output format respectively. It could also be done by having a single --format flag that would then be used like in --format=csv, --format=xml or --format=json with the same effect but I cannot and don't want to change the command-line interface.

I have already figured out a way to check that at most one of these options is used, that is, their mutual exclusivity. My solution for this is not the prettiest but I'm okay with this part.

Leaving this check out, my program currently looks like this.

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/program_options.hpp>

namespace po = boost::program_options;

enum output_formats {format_default, format_csv, format_xml, format_json};

int
main(int argc, char * * argv)
{
  auto options = po::options_description{"Options"};
  options.add_options()
    ("csv", "produce output in CSV format")
    ("xml", "produce output in XML format")
    ("json", "produce output in JSON format");
  auto vm = po::variables_map{};
  po::store(po::parse_command_line(argc, argv, options), vm);
  po::notify(vm);
  // Check that at most one of the options was passed (not shown here).
  auto format = format_default;
  if      (vm.count("csv"))  format = format_csv;
  else if (vm.count("xml"))  format = format_xml;
  else if (vm.count("json")) format = format_json;
  std::clog << "Output format: " << format << "\n";
}

It is working but I don't like the if, else if cascade to figure out what option (if any) the user passed.

I've seen that boost::program_options::bool_switch allows me to define flags that will set a bool and it works just fine. I would like to implement enum_switch so I can apply the same technique to my enum and re-write the code like this.

int
main(int argc, char * * argv)
{
  auto format = format_default;
  auto options = po::options_description{"Options"};
  options.add_options()
    ("csv", enum_switch(&format, format_csv), "produce output in CSV format")
    ("xml", enum_switch(&format, format_xml), "produce output in XML format")
    ("json", enum_switch(&format, format_json), "produce output in JSON format");
  auto vm = po::variables_map{};
  po::store(po::parse_command_line(argc, argv, options), vm);
  po::notify(vm);
  std::clog << "Output format: " << format << "\n";
}

I have found the implementation of bool_switch in Boost and it looks like this.

BOOST_PROGRAM_OPTIONS_DECL typed_value<bool>*
bool_switch(bool* v)
{
    typed_value<bool>* r = new typed_value<bool>(v);
    r->default_value(0);
    r->zero_tokens();
    return r;
}

Consequently, I have implemented enum_switch like this.

template <typename T>
boost::program_options::typed_value<T> *
enum_switch(T * dest, const T value)
{
  auto tv = new boost::program_options::typed_value<T>{dest};
  tv->default_value(value);
  tv->zero_tokens();
  return tv;
}

The first thing I've noticed is that Boost complained that my enum has no >> operator defined. Okay, I defined one and it turns out it never gets called. Unfortunately, the code still doesn't work as expected. If I call my program with no options, format will be format_json and if I pass, say, --xml, I get the following error:

option '--xml' requires at least one argument

If I pass --xml 1 I still get the same error and if I use --xml=1 then I get this funny error:

option '--xml' does not take any arguments

What am I missing to get working with my enum what apparently works for bool?

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Even though this question is already some years old, I found it now because I had the same problem.

To make a long story short: Instead of default_vaue() you need to call implicit_value() on the typed_value instance to set the desired format value.

I was also digging arounf a bit in the Program_options code to understand better this solution. From the api-doc of implicit_value():

Specifies an implicit value, which will be used if the option is given, but without an adjacent value. Using this implies that an explicit value is optional.

If an implicit value is given and there are no other explicit arguments, the value set by that call is directly stored into the variables_map during the call of po::store(). Otherwise, validate() is called to check the given arguments before store them. The general validation function always expects at least 1 argument while zero_tokens() already set the maximum to 0.

For the bool_switch() boost already provides an overloaded validate() that handles this case of implicitness in the proper way (only 1 other value besides the default of 0).

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