The function is to take a positive integer n and divide it by 2 (using integer division) until it reaches 1. The output should be the number of times that value is divided. My code so far is

def keep_halving(x):
    i=1
    for i in range(x):
        if x//2==0:
           return i

An example of how the function should run is

>>>keep_halving(4)
2
  • So what exactly is the problem that you're experiencing? There are numerous errors in this code, BTW. In fact, it is quite entirely wrong. Have you tried to run it step by step and see what's happening (an activity also known as debugging your code)? – barak manos Oct 30 '16 at 15:29
  • i=1 redundant. – abhishek-kdm Oct 30 '16 at 15:29
  • Also you will always return 1 every time your condition passes, which is definitely what you don't want to do. The i in your for loop is each value in your range. The i=1 has no effect there. – idjaw Oct 30 '16 at 15:31
  • 3
    @barak manos: I think Mihai Stefanescu would appreciate if you told him what exactly was wrong with his code and why and how he could improve it in order to achieve his goal (an activity also known as constructive criticism) – Ukimiku Oct 30 '16 at 15:40
  • @Ukimiku: Haha, +1 for that last statement :) – barak manos Oct 30 '16 at 16:00
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could try this:

n = int(input("enter number"))
while n > 1:
    n //= 2
    print (n)

Input: 128

Output:

enter number128
64
32
16
8
4
2
1

This will continuously divide by two using the while loop and stop when n gets to one.

Edit: I read your question too fast. Here is updated code:

count = 0
n = int(input("enter number"))
while n > 1:
    n //= 2
    print (n)
    count +=1
print (count)

This will add one onto count each time n is divided by two.

Input : 128

Output :

enter number128
64
32
16
8
4
2
1
7
  • Oh I didn't realize a while loop could be used here. Thank you very much – Mihai Stefanescu Oct 30 '16 at 15:49
  • No problem - apologies for not understanding your code initially. I am actually making something similar for a binary converter. One of the algorithms for converting decimal to binary is to keep dividing by two and noting down remainders. – August Williams Oct 30 '16 at 15:52
  • I simply did not include the print(n) which you left in the code in your answer. It ran as expected. Your help is much appreciated – Mihai Stefanescu Oct 30 '16 at 15:54
  • Yes, print(n) is not needed but I've always found it good practice to do something like that or similar to ensure that n is infact being divided by two each loop. No problem. – August Williams Oct 30 '16 at 15:55
  • Of course. It is a simple proof that the function is indeed working as it should. – Mihai Stefanescu Oct 30 '16 at 15:59

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