I'm currently trying to replace a for in loop that I have with a regular for loop out of curiosity, but with no success. I always get undefined. Is this even possible with javascript objects?

example object I loop over:

var el = {
    1: {type: "fish", commonName: "clownfish", scientificName: "sdasd", gender: "m", price: 1.99},
    2: {type: "fish", commonName: "dragonfish", scientificName: "dada", gender: "f", price: 2.99}
};

My working for in approach:

for (var element in el) {
   if (el[element].type === type && el.hasOwnProperty(element)) {
       elementNum++;
   }
}

The simple for loop approach that always gets me Cannot read property 'type' of undefined:

for(var i = 0, x = Object.keys(el).length; i < x; i++) {
   if (el[i].type === type && el.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
      elementNum++;
   }
}
  • 1
    @Matias has the right answer, but I'm wondering why you aren't using an array? Are some indexes going to be skipped or something? Also, switch the order of (el[i].type === type && el.hasOwnProperty(i)) so that it doesn't check for .type if el[i] doesn't exist (because javascript stops looking through the if AND statement if it finds one that is false. – Howzieky Oct 30 '16 at 20:23
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're starting your loop from 0 while your first key in the whole object is 1.

var el = {
  1: {
    type: "fish",
    commonName: "clownfish",
    scientificName: "sdasd",
    gender: "m",
    price: 1.99
  },
  2: {
    type: "fish",
    commonName: "dragonfish",
    scientificName: "dada",
    gender: "f",
    price: 2.99
  }
};

var keyLength = Object.keys(el).length;

// I've simplified the for loop
for (var i = 1; i <= keyLength; i++) {
  console.log(el[i].commonName);
}

  • The answer cannot be shorter. Nice! – Tân Nguyễn Oct 30 '16 at 20:22
  • dammit, how could I not see this.. Thank you!! – Sebsemillia Oct 30 '16 at 20:22
  • @Sebsemillia I would consider that sometimes my mind is like a language hint tool (JSHint, JSLint...) lol – Matías Fidemraizer Oct 30 '16 at 20:24
  • @MatíasFidemraizer hehe ^^ – Sebsemillia Oct 30 '16 at 20:24
  • @4castle Fixed... – Matías Fidemraizer Oct 30 '16 at 20:27

I suggest to iterate directly over the keys of the object.

function getCount(type) {
    return Object.keys(el).reduce(function (r, k) {
        return r + +(el[k].type === type);
    }, 0);
}

var el = { 1: { type: "fish", commonName: "clownfish", scientificName: "sdasd", gender: "m", price: 1.99 }, 2: { type: "fish", commonName: "dragonfish", scientificName: "dada", gender: "f", price: 2.99 } };

console.log(getCount('fish'));

  • yes, I know this approach as well. I just wanted to try to do it with a simple for loop.. ;) thank you for your answer! – Sebsemillia Oct 30 '16 at 20:26
  • it works only if the object is in a fixed notation for the keys, like indices. – Nina Scholz Oct 30 '16 at 20:29

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