7
SELECT * 
FROM (SELECT id, user, MAX(score) FROM table_1 GROUP BY user) AS sub
ORDER BY 'sub.score' ASC;

This SQL query should select from a table only a score per user, and for accuracy, the highest.

The table structure is this:

+-----------------------+
| id | score | username |
+-----------------------+
| 1  |    15 |     mike |
| 2  |    23 |     tom  |
| 3  |    16 |     mike |
| 4  |    22 |     jack |

etc..

The result should be like:

3 mike 16
2 tom  23
4 jack 22

And then reordered:

3 mike 16
4 jack 22
2 tom  23

But the query does not reorder the subquery by score. How to do so?

5
  • I have voted to migrate this to Stackoverflow. You should not delete or cross-post this question at Stackoverflow. Oct 30, 2016 at 23:12
  • 1
    This returns an arbitrary id
    – Strawberry
    Oct 31, 2016 at 6:39
  • i think, you dont have score in your sub table, because u dont give max(score) alias. Oct 31, 2016 at 8:09
  • and your ID should in group by too. Oct 31, 2016 at 8:16
  • No one solved, I think the only way is to create a new table with results and then reorder it.
    – Northumber
    Nov 1, 2016 at 7:49

3 Answers 3

5

Let's look at what you are doing step by step:

SELECT id, user, MAX(score) FROM table_1 GROUP BY user

Here you are grouping by user name, so you get one result row per user name. In this result row you select the user name, the maximum score found for this user name (which is 16 for 'mike') and one of the IDs found for the user name (which can be 1 or 3 for 'mike', the DBMS is free to choose one). This is probably not what you want.

SELECT * FROM (...) AS sub  ORDER BY 'sub.score' ASC;

'sub.score' is a string (single quotes). You want to order by the max score from your subquery instead. So first give the max(score) a name, e.g. max(score) as max_score, and then access that: ORDER BY sub.max_score ASC.

Anyway, if you want the record with the maximum score for a user name (so as to get the according ID, too), you could look for records for which not exists a record with the same user name and a higher score. Sorting is easy then: as there is no aggregation, you simply order by score:

select * from table_1 t1 where not exists 
  (select * from table_1 higher where higher.name = t1.name and higher.score > t1.score)
order by score;
2
  • 1
    This shows correct results but does not reorder by score.
    – Northumber
    Nov 1, 2016 at 7:47
  • Sorry, my fault, I had not realized that the score was TEXT type, he was ordered according to ASCII and not the numbers. Thanks for the help :D
    – Northumber
    Nov 1, 2016 at 8:16
2

No need to write sub queries. Simply you can use this way:

SELECT id, `user`, MAX(score) FROM table_1 GROUP BY `user`
ORDER BY MAX(score);

If you want query with sub query:

SELECT * FROM (SELECT id, `user`, MAX(score) as max_score FROM table_1
GROUP BY `user`) AS sub ORDER BY max_score;
2
  • 1
    First query: Yes, that's a simpler way to write the original query. However, the issue that the returned ID can be totally unrelated to the maximum score is still present. Second query: there is no score in the results of the subquery; you would have to give max(score) an alias name. Oct 31, 2016 at 8:21
  • You're welcome. However, your answer won't help the OP that much. You've shown how to write the ORDER BYclause properly, which is good, but your queries still don't address the problem with the wrong ID the OP is obviously not aware of. Oct 31, 2016 at 8:28
2

Assuming user|score is unique..:

SELECT x.*
   FROM table_1 x
  JOIN ( SELECT user, MAX(score) score FROM table_1 GROUP BY user) y 
    ON y.user = x.user 
   AND y.score = x.score
 ORDER BY x.score 
2
  • Also this not reorder results by score :(
    – Northumber
    Nov 1, 2016 at 7:41
  • Sorry, my fault, I had not realized that the score was TEXT type, he was ordered according to ASCII and not the numbers. Thanks for the help :D
    – Northumber
    Nov 1, 2016 at 8:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.