4

I've stream of strings and nulls like

Stream<String> str1 = Stream.of("A","B","C",null,null,"D",null,"E","F",null,"G",null);

I want to reduce it to another stream, where any sequence of not null string joined together, ie like

Stream<String> str2 = Stream.of("ABC", "", "D", "EF","G")

First way, that i found - create collector that firstly reduce complete input stream to single object with list of all joined strings and then create new stream from it:

class Acc1 {
  final private List<String> data = new ArrayList<>();
  final private StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

  private void accept(final String s) {
    if (s != null) 
      sb.append(s);
    else {
      data.add(sb.toString());
      sb.setLength(0);
    }
  }

  public static Collector<String,Acc1,Stream<String>> collector() {
    return Collector.of(Acc1::new, Acc1::accept, (a,b)-> a, acc -> acc.data.stream());
  }
}
...
Stream<String> str2 = str.collect(Acc1.collector());

But in this case before any use if str2, even as str2.findFirst(), input stream will be completely processed. It time and memory consuming operation and on infinity stream from some generator it will not work at all

Another way - create external object that will keep intermediate state and use it in flatMap():

class Acc2 {
  final private StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

  Stream<String> accept(final String s) {
    if (s != null) {
      sb.append(s);
      return Stream.empty();
    } else {
      final String result = sb.toString();
      sb.setLength(0);
      return Stream.of(result);
    }
  }
}
...
Acc2 acc = new Acc2();
Stream<String> str2 = str1.flatMap(acc::accept);

In this case from str1 will be retrieved only elemets that really accessed via str2.

But using of external object, created outside of stream processing, looks ugly for me and probably can cause some side effects, that i do not see now. Also if str2 will be used later with parallelStream() it will cause unpredictable result.

Is there any more correct implemetation of stream->stream reduction without these flaws?

  • 1
    There is library"StreamEx" it contains grouptun method (do not remember exact name). Using it you can convert your stream to stream of filled and empty lists. Next move is obvious. – talex Oct 31 '16 at 11:21
  • 1
    @Josep Prat: you should never use reduce with functions that modify their arguments. The collect method, as already used by the OP, is the right approach for mutable reduction. The fact, that reduction will process all elements, doesn’t change, whether you use reduce or collect. – Holger Oct 31 '16 at 12:19
  • 1
    @Josep Prat: you started with an empty List as “Identity function” and omitted how this list plays together with the strings in the accumulator function, but obviously had modifying the List in mind, further you wrote “the combiner being the list concatenation (addAll)” and what is List.addAll, if not a function that modifies one of the input lists? – Holger Oct 31 '16 at 12:53
  • 1
    Ok, your comment is not supposed to be a complete solution, but why do you suggests using reduce at all; what’s the supposed advantage over the Collector based solution, the OP already has posted in the question? – Holger Oct 31 '16 at 13:02
  • 1
    @Josep Prat: Sure, when you have immutable data structures only, there is no need to differentiate. That also implies that the language’s library will provide the necessary tools to deal with these structures (like a list concatenation that returns a new list, but may somehow get optimized under the hood at runtime to reduce or even eliminate the copying overhead). But here, the question wasn’t how to do the reduction… – Holger Oct 31 '16 at 13:44
5

Reduction or its mutable variant, collect, is always an operation that will process all items. Your operation can be implemented via a custom Spliterator, e.g.

public static Stream<String> joinGroups(Stream<String> s) {
    Spliterator<String> sp=s.spliterator();
    return StreamSupport.stream(
        new Spliterators.AbstractSpliterator<String>(sp.estimateSize(), 
        sp.characteristics()&Spliterator.ORDERED | Spliterator.NONNULL) {
            private StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            private String last;

            public boolean tryAdvance(Consumer<? super String> action) {
                if(!sp.tryAdvance(str -> last=str))
                    return false;
                while(last!=null) {
                    sb.append(last);
                    if(!sp.tryAdvance(str -> last=str)) break;
                }
                action.accept(sb.toString());
                sb=new StringBuilder();
                return true;
            }
        }, false);
}

which produces the intended groups, as you can test with

joinGroups(Stream.of("A","B","C",null,null,"D",null,"E","F",null,"G",null))
    .forEach(System.out::println);

but also has the desired lazy behavior, testable via

joinGroups(
    Stream.of("A","B","C",null,null,"D",null,"E","F",null,"G",null)
          .peek(str -> System.out.println("consumed "+str))
).skip(1).filter(s->!s.isEmpty()).findFirst().ifPresent(System.out::println);

After a second thought, I came to this slightly more efficient variant. It will incorporate the StringBuilder only if there are at least two Strings to join, otherwise, it will simply use the already existing sole String instance or the literal "" string for empty groups:

public static Stream<String> joinGroups(Stream<String> s) {
    Spliterator<String> sp=s.spliterator();
    return StreamSupport.stream(
        new Spliterators.AbstractSpliterator<String>(sp.estimateSize(), 
        sp.characteristics()&Spliterator.ORDERED | Spliterator.NONNULL) {
            private String next;

            public boolean tryAdvance(Consumer<? super String> action) {
                if(!sp.tryAdvance(str -> next=str))
                    return false;
                String string=next;
                if(string==null) string="";
                else if(sp.tryAdvance(str -> next=str) && next!=null) {
                    StringBuilder sb=new StringBuilder().append(string);
                    do sb.append(next);while(sp.tryAdvance(str -> next=str) && next!=null);
                    string=sb.toString();
                }
                action.accept(string);
                return true;
            }
        }, false);
}
  • Thank you, it exactly what i looking for, native method instead of tricks. Btw iterator() from input stream instead of spliterator() maybe more comfortable – rustot Nov 1 '16 at 7:33
  • @rustot: It’s tempting to use an Iterator, because we are more familiar with it, as it is much older, and in this specific case we might get away with it, but more than often, implementing a Spliterator atop a source Spliterator is much more straight-forward and potentially more efficient, as we pass a size estimate and characteristics to the result stream. Further, most source streams will be more efficient when traversed via Spliterator, which doesn’t have its logic split between a hasNext and next method… – Holger Nov 1 '16 at 9:13
  • 2 invocations hasNext + next vs 2 invocations tryAdvance + accept and temporary instance creation for lambda But i care not about efficiency, iterator allow look-ahead "is it latest element in stream" and special processing for it – rustot Nov 2 '16 at 8:25
  • @rustot: I’m not considering just the number of invocations. It’s more about how the underlying source has to implement it. See for example Files.lines, which is backed by a single method BufferedReader.readLine, which will return the next line or null, which matches exactly the tryAdavance logic. In contrast, an Iterator has to poll the next line in hasNext and remember it, so that next can return it, but it also has to ensure that multiple invocations of hasNext without next don’t advance and that calling next without hasNext also does the right thing. – Holger Nov 2 '16 at 8:46
  • In other words, the “look-ahead” of hasNext is a disguise here. It’s actually a polling for the next item, just like tryAdvance, followed by a storage operation, so the subsequent next call can retrieve it. But a simple if(hasNext()) next() bears five conditionals. First, next has to check whether next has already been called, then it will poll the next item, check the result and return the condition, then, the caller evaluate the boolean result and calls next, which will again check, whether next has been called and to what result. – Holger Nov 2 '16 at 8:50
5

It's quite hard to implement such scenarios using standard Stream API. In my free StreamEx library I extended standard Stream interface with methods which allow to perform so-called "partial reduction" which is exactly what is necessary here:

StreamEx<String> str1 = StreamEx.of("A","B","C",null,null,"D",null,"E","F",null,"G",null);
Stream<String> str2 = str1.collapse((a, b) -> a != null,
                          MoreCollectors.filtering(Objects::nonNull, Collectors.joining()));
str2.map(x -> '"'+x+'"').forEach(System.out::println);

Output:

"ABC"
""
"D"
"EF"
"G"

The StreamEx.collapse() method performs a partial reduction of the stream using the supplied collector. The first argument is a predicate which applied to two adjacent original items and should return true if they must be reduced together. Here we just require that first of the pair is not null ((a, b) -> a != null): this means that every group ends with null and new group starts here. Now we need to join group letters together: this can be done by standard Collectors.joining() collector. However we need also to filter out null. We can do it using MoreCollectors.filtering collector (actually the same collector will be available in Java 9 in Collectors class).

This implementation is completely lazy and quite friendly to parallel processing.

  • Thank you, interesting library! – rustot Nov 1 '16 at 7:36

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