Usually, an async deadlock occurs in UI thread or with ASP.NET context. I'm trying to simulate the deadlock in a console application so that I can unit test my library codes.

So here's my attempt:

class Program
{
    private static async Task DelayAsync()
    {
        Console.WriteLine( "DelayAsync.Start" );
        await Task.Delay( 1000 );
        Console.WriteLine( "DelayAsync.End" );
    }

    // This method causes a deadlock when called in a GUI or ASP.NET context.
    public static void Deadlock()
    {
        Console.WriteLine( "Deadlock.Start" );
        // Start the delay.
        var delayTask = DelayAsync();
        // Wait for the delay to complete.
        delayTask.Wait();
        Console.WriteLine( "Deadlock.End" );
    }

    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
        var thread = new Thread( () => 
        {
            Console.WriteLine( "Thread.Start" );
            SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext( new DedicatedThreadSynchronisationContext() );
            Deadlock();
            Console.WriteLine( "Thread.End" );
        } );
        thread.Start();
        Console.WriteLine( "Thread.Join.Start" );
        thread.Join();
        Console.WriteLine( "Thread.Join.End" );
        Console.WriteLine( "Press any key to exit" );
        Console.ReadKey( true );
        Console.WriteLine( "Pressed" );
    }
}

So Deadlock() should cause a deadlock in an right context. To simulate the ASP.NET context, I'm using DedicatedThreadSynchronisationContext from https://stackoverflow.com/a/31714115/121240:

public sealed class DedicatedThreadSynchronisationContext : SynchronizationContext, IDisposable
{
    public DedicatedThreadSynchronisationContext()
    {
        m_thread = new Thread( ThreadWorkerDelegate );
        m_thread.Start( this );
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        m_queue.CompleteAdding();
    }

    /// <summary>Dispatches an asynchronous message to the synchronization context.</summary>
    /// <param name="d">The System.Threading.SendOrPostCallback delegate to call.</param>
    /// <param name="state">The object passed to the delegate.</param>
    public override void Post( SendOrPostCallback d, object state )
    {
        if ( d == null ) throw new ArgumentNullException( "d" );
        m_queue.Add( new KeyValuePair<SendOrPostCallback, object>( d, state ) );
    }

    /// <summary> As 
    public override void Send( SendOrPostCallback d, object state )
    {
        using ( var handledEvent = new ManualResetEvent( false ) )
        {
            Post( SendOrPostCallback_BlockingWrapper, Tuple.Create( d, state, handledEvent ) );
            handledEvent.WaitOne();
        }
    }

    public int WorkerThreadId { get { return m_thread.ManagedThreadId; } }
    //=========================================================================================

    private static void SendOrPostCallback_BlockingWrapper( object state )
    {
        var innerCallback = ( state as Tuple<SendOrPostCallback, object, ManualResetEvent> );
        try
        {
            innerCallback.Item1( innerCallback.Item2 );
        }
        finally
        {
            innerCallback.Item3.Set();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>The queue of work items.</summary>
    private readonly BlockingCollection<KeyValuePair<SendOrPostCallback, object>> m_queue =
        new BlockingCollection<KeyValuePair<SendOrPostCallback, object>>();

    private readonly Thread m_thread = null;

    /// <summary>Runs an loop to process all queued work items.</summary>
    private void ThreadWorkerDelegate( object obj )
    {
        SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext( obj as SynchronizationContext );

        try
        {
            foreach ( var workItem in m_queue.GetConsumingEnumerable() )
                workItem.Key( workItem.Value );
        }
        catch ( ObjectDisposedException ) { }
    }
}

I set the context before calling Deadlock():

SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext( new DedicatedThreadSynchronisationContext() );

I expect the code to hang on this line because it should capture the context:

await Task.Delay( 1000 );

However , it passes just fine and the program runs through the end, and it prints "Pressed". (Although the program hangs on DedicatedThreadSynchronisationContext.ThreadWorkerDelegate() so it doesn't exist, but I consider it a minor issue.)

Why doesn't it produce a dead lock? What is the proper way to simulate a dead lock?

========================================

EDIT

As per the answer by Luaan,

I used DedicatedThreadSynchronisationContext.Send() instead of creating a new thread:

        Console.WriteLine( "Send.Start" );
        var staContext = new DedicatedThreadSynchronisationContext();
        staContext.Send( ( state ) =>
        {
            Deadlock();
        }, null );
        Console.WriteLine( "Send.End" );

It lets Deadlock() to run under the context, so 'await' captures the same context thus a dead lock occurs.

Thank you Luaan!

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because Deadlock doesn't run on the same thread as your synchronization context.

You need to make sure to run Deadlock on the synchronization context - just setting the context and calling a method doesn't ensure that.

The easiest way to do this with little modification is to send the Deadlock synchronously to the synchronization context:

SynchronizationContext.Current.Send(_ => Deadlock(), null);

This gives you a nice deadlock on the delay task wait :)

  • It makes sense. I called send() on DedicatedThreadSynchronisationContext, and voila, a dead lock! – wooohoh Oct 31 '16 at 14:36

The synchronization context that you're using is creating a new thread and having all work sent to it to that thread to be done, so the fact that you're blocking the thread that you set the synchronization context from is irrelevant as it's not the thread that's doing the work.

If you wanted to deadlock it you'd need to schedule a callback to use that synchronization context and then block there, when there are also additional callbacks needed for it to continue. Alternatively, you could use a more traditional message loop that runs in the thread that starts it, rather than creating a new one silently.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.