5
use strict;
my @array=('f1','f2','f3');
my $dir ='\tmp';
foreach (@array) {
my $FH = $_;
open ("$FH", ">$dir/${FH}.txt") or die $!;
}

foreach (@array) {
 my $FH = $_;
 close($FH);
}

i got "Can't use string ("f1") as a symbol ref while "strict refs" in use at bbb.pl line 6." error . What is the isuse ?

  • 3
    Have you tried reading about "open" at perldoc? There are issues that you have: 1) You can't use "$FH" as the first arg to open. You need a separate scalar to hold a ref to a file handle or a bareword form; 2) you are using 2 arg from of open. Don't do that. Use 3 arg form. 3) Use File::Path to assemble path names. – dawg Oct 27 '10 at 15:55
  • 1
    drewk, I think you meant to say Path::Class, not File::Path. – daxim Oct 27 '10 at 16:40
  • @daxim: correct – dawg Oct 27 '10 at 20:33
  • Putting this error message into google gives several pages of answers. – brian d foy Oct 28 '10 at 3:39
6

First: 2 arg open is bad, 3 arg open is better.

open( .. , ">", "$dir/${FN}.txt")   

second, what on earth are you doing with open("$FH" ..

argument 1 to open is supposed to be an actual filehandle of sorts which can be connected to a datastream. passing it a string will not work.

INSANE:  open( "Hello world", .... )  # how can we open hello world, its not a file handle
WORKS:   open( *FH,.... )  # but don't do this, globs are package-globals and pesky
BEST:    open( my $fh, .... ) # and they close themself when $fh goes out of scope! 

third

foreach my $filename ( @ARRAY ){ 
}

Forth:

dir = \tmp ? are you sure? I think you meant /tmp , \tmp is something different altogether.

Fifth:

use warnings;

using strict is good, but you should use warnings too.

Sixth: Use names for variables that are explanatory, we know @ is an array @array is not more helpful.

ALL TOGETHER

use strict;
use warnings;

my @filenames=('f1','f2','f3');
my @filehandles = ();
my $dir ='/tmp';
foreach my $filename (@filenames) {
   open (my $fh,'>', "${dir}/${filename}.txt") or die $!;
   push @filehandles, $fh;
}
# some code here, ie: 
foreach my $filehandle ( @filehandles ) { 
   print {$filehandle}  "Hello world!";
}
# and then were done, cleanup time
foreach my $filehandle ( @filehandles ){ 
   close $filehandle or warn "Closing a filehandle didn't work, $!";
}

Alternatively, depending on what you were trying to do, this may have been better code:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @filenames=('f1','f2','f3');
my $dir ='/tmp';
foreach my $filename (@filenames) {
   open (my $fh,'>', "${dir}/${filename}.txt") or die $!;
   print {$fh}  "Hello world!";
}

I don't explicitly close $fh, because its not needed, as soon as $fh goes out of scope ( at the end of the block in this case ) it is closed automatically.

  • 1
    1-arg open is best. or shortest or something like that. – ysth Oct 28 '10 at 3:18
  • 1
    Damn you ysth, damn you. I went and researched how 1-arg open works, and now myself, and a small group of people on IRC, wish they didn't know. ` perl -e '$FILE = q{ps aux |}; open(FILE) or die $!; print <FILE>;'` YUCK – Kent Fredric Oct 28 '10 at 4:09
  • 2
    @ysth: we should campaign for 0-arg open. perl -we 'for (q{ps aux |}){ open _; print <_>; }' is too long. for (q{ps aux |}){ open; print <_>; } or even open && print <_> for (q{ps aux |}); – Kent Fredric Oct 28 '10 at 4:56
6

You are using a string "f1" as the first argument to open which expects a filehandle.

You probably wanted to do:

my @filehandles = (); # Stash filehandles there so as to not lose filenames
foreach (@array) {
    my $FH = $_;
    open (my $fh, ">", "$dir/${FH}.txt") or die $!;
    push @filehandles, $fh;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.