There is no static keyword in Kotlin.

What is the best way to represent a static Java method in Kotlin?

23 Answers 23

up vote 505 down vote accepted

You place the function in the "companion object".

So the java code like this:

class Foo {
  public static int a() { return 1; }
}

will become

class Foo {
  companion object {
     fun a() : Int = 1
  }
}

You can then use it from inside Kotlin code as

Foo.a();

But from within Java code, you would need to call it as

Foo.Companion.a();

(Which also works from within Kotlin.)

If you don't like having to specify the Companion bit you can either add a @JvmStatic annotation or name your companion class.

From the docs:

Companion Objects

An object declaration inside a class can be marked with the companion keyword:

class MyClass {
   companion object Factory {
       fun create(): MyClass = MyClass()
   }
}

Members of the companion object can be called by using simply the class name as the qualifier:

val instance = MyClass.create()

...

However, on the JVM you can have members of companion objects generated as real static methods and fields, if you use the @JvmStatic annotation. See the Java interoperability section for more details.

Adding the @JvmStatic annotation looks like this

class Foo {
  companion object {
    @JvmStatic
    fun a() : Int = 1;
  }
}

and then it will exist as a real Java static function, accessible from both Java and Kotlin as Foo.a().

If it is just disliked for the Companion name, then you can also provide an explicit name for the companion object looks like this:

class Foo {
  companion object Blah {
    fun a() : Int = 1;
  }
}

which will let you call it from Kotlin in the same way, but from java like Foo.Blah.a() (which will also work in Kotlin).

  • 1
    In Kotlin it will be fun a(): Int { return 1 } or even fun a(): Int = 1 – Dmitry Zaytsev Mar 17 '17 at 9:08
  • best part is the docs about @JvmStatic – Muhammad Naderi Jul 31 '17 at 4:55
  • 1
    @DmitryZaitsev or even fun a() = 1. – Moira Aug 4 '17 at 7:26
  • What do Factory mean? – Bagus Aji Santoso Aug 24 '17 at 4:25
  • 1
    @Yajairo87 I think what you're asking is too much to cover in a comment here - so I've created a question addressing it directly : stackoverflow.com/questions/47046474/… – Michael Anderson Nov 1 '17 at 0:31

Docs recomends solving most of the needs for static functions with package-level functions. They are simply declared outside a class inn a source code file. The package of a file can be specified in the beginning of a package with the package keyword.

Declaration

package foo

fun bar() = {}

Usage

import foo.bar

Alternatively

import foo.*

You can now call the function with:

bar()

or if you do not use the import keyword:

foo.bar()

If you do not specify the package the function will be accessible from the root.

If you only have experience with java, this might seem a little strange. The reason is that kotlin is not a strictly object-oriented language. You could say it supports methods outside of classes.

  • 1
    Note that under the hood these "top-level" or "package" functions are actually compiled into their own class. In the above example, the compiler would create a class FooPackage with all of the top-level properties and functions, and route all of your references to them appropriately. More info from jetbrains. – Mitchell Tracy Dec 8 '17 at 14:59
  • 5
    +1 For explaining how to do the equivalent right in Kotlin rather than just the mirror equivalent from Java. – phoenix Feb 8 at 1:06

1. Define :

Any method/ val/ var inside object( keyword for Singleton) will act like static in java.

Use a companion object if you want to call a method simply using the class that contains the object.

object Foo{
fun sayFoo() = println("Foo")
val bar ="bar"
}

2. Usage :

Foo.sayFoo()
println(Foo.bar)

3. Output :

Foo
bar
  • If i m trying to initialize in some other class its gives java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError and I m using var instead of val – Sudarshan Jun 21 '17 at 12:25
  • 3
    Method calls need to have the INSTANCE keyword, like this: Foo.INSTANCE.sayFoo() – Raeglan Feb 16 at 12:17
  • I think this solution is the prefered way if you want a static CLASS not just static methdos. Because with companion objects you still can instantiate the parent class. – fabriciorissetto Jul 23 at 18:08

Use object to represent val/var/method to make static. You can use object instead of singleton class also. You can use companion if you wanted to make static inside of a class

object Abc{
     fun sum(a: Int, b: Int): Int = a + b
    }
object objectName {
    fun funName() {

    }
}
  • 1
    While this code snippet may be the solution, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. – Narendra Jadhav Jul 19 at 6:16

You need to pass companion object for static method because kotlin don’t have static keyword - Members of the companion object can be called by using simply the class name as the qualifier:

package xxx
    class ClassName {
              companion object {
                       fun helloWord(str: String): String {
                            return stringValue
                      }
              }
    }

There are 2 ways you can apply static in Kotlin

First make a companion object under class

For ex:

class Test{
    companion object{
          fun isCheck(a:Int):Boolean{
             if(a==0) true else false
          }
     }
}

you can call this function as

Test.Companion.isCheck(2)

Another way we can use is to make an object class

object Test{
       fun isCheck(a:Int):Boolean{
            if(a==0) true else false
       }
}

Happy Coding!

  • For first usage (i.e. Test.Companion.isCheck(2)) IDE shows warnings and say Companion reference is redundant. It can be reduced to Test.isCheck(2) and the reduced form is more close to java equivalent. – VSB Oct 27 at 14:23

Kotlin has no any static keyword. You used that for java

 class AppHelper {
        public static int getAge() {
            return 30;
        }
    }

and For Kotlin

class AppHelper {
        companion object {
            fun getAge() : Int = 30
        }
    }

Call for Java

AppHelper.getAge();

Call for Kotlin

AppHelper.Companion.getAge();

I think its working perfectly.

This also worked for me

object Bell {
    @JvmStatic
    fun ring() { }
}

from Kotlin

Bell.ring()

from Java

Bell.ring()

I would like to add something to above answers.

Yes, you can define functions in source code files(outside class). But it is better if you define static functions inside class using Companion Object because you can add more static functions by leveraging the Kotlin Extensions.

class MyClass {
    companion object { 
        //define static functions here
    } 
}

//Adding new static function
fun MyClass.Companion.newStaticFunction() {
    // ...
}

And you can call above defined function as you will call any function inside Companion Object.

Use the function inside "companion object or named object".

See example of companion object:

   class Foo {
  companion object {
     fun square(x : Int) : Int = x*x
  }
}

See the example of named object

object Foo{
   fun square(x : Int) : Int = x*x
}

You can access by using

val k = Foo.square(12)

Simply you need to create a companion object and put the function in it

  class UtilClass {
        companion object {
  //        @JvmStatic
            fun repeatIt5Times(str: String): String = str.repeat(5)
        }
    }

To invoke the method from a kotlin class:

class KotlinClass{
  fun main(args : Array<String>) { 
    UtilClass.repeatIt5Times("Hello")
  }
}

or Using import

import Packagename.UtilClass.Companion.repeatIt5Times
class KotlinClass{
  fun main(args : Array<String>) { 
     repeatIt5Times("Hello")
  }
}

To invoke the method from a java class:

 class JavaClass{
    public static void main(String [] args){
       UtilClass.Companion.repeatIt5Times("Hello");
    }
 }

or by adding @JvmStatic annotation to the method

class JavaClass{
   public static void main(String [] args){
     UtilClass.repeatIt5Times("Hello")
   }
}

or both by adding @JvmStatic annotation to the method and making static import in java

import static Packagename.UtilClass.repeatIt5Times
class JavaClass{
   public static void main(String [] args){
     repeatIt5Times("Hello")
   }
}

Companion Objects is the alternate of java static keyword and you can make a class or a method as static by declaring them as Companion Objects.
You don’t need to qualify companion objects with the class name either if you’re calling them from within the same class.

For example:

class SomeClass() {

    val id: Int

    init {
       id = nextId++       
    }

    private companion object {
       var nextId = 1
    }
}

fun main(args: Array<String>) {
    repeat(2) { 
        println(SomeClass().id)
    }
} 

You can use objects other than companion object

object Utils {
    fun someFunction()
}

So this will be looked like when the method is called.

Utils.someFunction()

make a companion object and mark the method with jvmstatic annotation

Write them directly to files.

In Java (ugly):

package xxx;
class XxxUtils {
  public static final Yyy xxx(Xxx xxx) { return xxx.xxx(); }
}

In Kotlin:

@file:JvmName("XxxUtils")
package xxx
fun xxx(xxx: Xxx): Yyy = xxx.xxx()

Those two pieces of codes are equaled after compilation (even the compiled file name, the file:JvmName is used to control the compiled file name, which should be put just before the package name declaration).

  • 7
    You forgot "Kotlin (ugly)" ... KOTLIN: companion object { val handler = object : Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()) {] ..... JAVA: static Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()) {}; – CmosBattery Nov 14 '17 at 15:30
  • I think he didn't really program at Java – user25 Jul 8 at 17:49

Suppose you have a class Student. And you have one static method getUniversityName() & one field called totalStudent.

You should declare companion object block inside your class.

    companion object {
 // define static method & field here.
}

Then your class looks like

    class Student(var name: String, var city: String, var rollNumber: Double = 0.0) {

    // use companion object structure
    companion object {

        // below method will work as static method
        fun getUniversityName(): String = "MBSTU"

        // below field will work as static field
        var totalStudent = 30
    }
}

Then you can use those static method and fields like this way.

println("University : " + Student.getUniversityName() + ", Total Student: " + Student.totalStudent)
    // Output:
    // University : MBSTU, Total Student: 30

You can achieve the static functionality in Kotlin by Companion Objects

  • Adding companion to the object declaration allows for adding the static functionality to an object even though the actual static concept does not exist in Kotlin.
  • A companion object can access all members of the class too, including the private constructors.
  • A companion object is initialized when the class is instantiated.
  • A companion object cannot be declared outside the class.

    class MyClass{
    
        companion object {
    
            val staticField = "This is an example of static field Object Decleration"
    
            fun getStaticFunction(): String {
                return "This is example of static function for Object Decleration"
            }
    
        }
    }
    

Members of the companion object can be called by using simply the class name as the qualifier:

Output:

MyClass.staticField // This is an example of static field Object Decleration

MyClass.getStaticFunction() : // This is an example of static function for Object Decleration

All static member and function should be inside companion block

  companion object {
    @JvmStatic
    fun main(args: Array<String>) {
    }

    fun staticMethod() {
    }
  }

The java code is like as below:

class Foo { public static int a() { return 1; } }

will become as below in kotlin:

class Foo { companion object { fun a() : Int = 1 } }

However, using @JvmStatic annotation on the JVM, we can have members of companion objects generated as real static methods and fields.

Use @JVMStatic Annotation

companion object {

    // TODO: Rename and change types and number of parameters
    @JvmStatic
    fun newInstance(param1: String, param2: String) =
            EditProfileFragment().apply {
                arguments = Bundle().apply {
                    putString(ARG_PARAM1, param1)
                    putString(ARG_PARAM2, param2)
                }
            }
}

A lot of people mention companion objects, which is correct. But, just so you know, you can also use any sort of object (using the object keyword, not class) i.e.,

object StringUtils {
    fun toUpper(s: String) : String { ... }
}

Use it just like any static method in java:

StringUtils.toUpper("foobar")

That sort of pattern is kind of useless in Kotlin though, one of its strengths is that it gets rid of the need for classes filled with static methods. It is more appropriate to utilize global, extension and/or local functions instead, depending on your use case. Where I work we often define global extension functions in a separate, flat file with the naming convention: [className]Extensions.kt i.e., FooExtensions.kt. But more typically we write functions where they are needed inside their operating class or object.

You can use Companion Objects - kotlinlang

Which it can be shown by first creating that Interface

interface I<T> {

}

Then we have to make a function inside of that interface:

fun SomeFunc(): T

Then after, We need a class:

class SomeClass {}

inside that class we need a companion Object inside that class:

companion object : I<SomeClass> {}

inside that Companion Object we need that old SomeFunc function, But we need to over ride it:

override fun SomeFunc(): SomeClass = SomeClass()

Finally below all of that work, We need something to power that Static function, We need a variable:

var e:I<SomeClass> = SomeClass()

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.