3

In our code we have the following class:

template<class A, class B>
class myClass
{
    typedef std::list<Object<A,B>> MyList;
    typedef std::map<A, typename mList::iterator> MyMap

    MyList mList;
    MyMap mMap;
}

class A is metaprogrammed and it can be a string, int and so on. I would like to change the code so in case class A is a "meta string" a map will be used, otherwise unordered_map will be used.

I've tried to add some more meta programming but haven't succeeded yet:

template< class A, class B>
struct MapType // default
{
    typedef std::list<Object<A,B>> MyList;
    typedef std::unordered_map<A,B> MyMap;
}

//TODO struct with templated A (string) to use std::map

template<class A, class B>
class myClass
{
    ???? // if A ~ String define myMap to MAP . otherwise unordered

    MyList mList;
    MyMap mMap;
}

any other suggestions for using different map type will be appreciated as well.

Thanks

  • 2
    What exactly is a "meta string"? A specific class? A class implementing a specific interface? A class with specific properties? – celtschk Nov 1 '16 at 8:54
  • 1
    In the first code block, shouldn't MyMap be defined like this typedef std::map<A, typename MyList::iterator> MyMap? – Danh Nov 1 '16 at 8:54
3

A simple solution would be to use std::conditional to check if A is the same as your "meta string" class (I picked std::string for demonstration purposes):

template<class A, class B>
class myClass
{
    std::list<Object<A,B>> mList;
    std::conditional_t<std::is_same<A,std::string>::value,
                       std::map<A,B>, std::unordered_map<A,B>> mMap;
};

Another possibility would be to use partial specialization:

template<class A, class B>
class myClass
{
    std::list<Object<A,B>> mList;
    std::unordered_map<A,B> mMap;
};

template<class B>
class myClass<std::string,B>
{
    std::list<Object<std::string,B>> mList;
    std::map<std::string,B> mMap;
};
  • Thanks for the answer. It is very helpful. – user7036306 Nov 1 '16 at 9:30
2

Use std::conditonal trait:

template<class A, class B>
class myClass
{
    using MyList = std::list<Object<A,B>>;
    using MyMap = std::conditional_t<IsMetaString<A>::value,
                        std::map<A, typename mList::iterator>,
                        std::unordered_map<A, typename mList::iterator>>;

    MyList mList;
    MyMap mMap;
}

Please note I took the liberty to replace your tyedefs with the using type alias, which you should do too.

What is left is to implement IsMetaString, which depending on your definition of Meta String could be as simple as:

template <class T> struct IsMetaString : std::false_type {};
template <> struct IsMetaString<std::string> : std::true_type {};

for instance if by meta string you mean std::string. Or you could modify it to your needs.

Also I think you meant typename MyList::iterator instead of typename mList::iterator.

  • Since you felt you had to downvote my answer, on the basis its substance was incorporated into another members post, I return the favour. After all, the content of your post is also essentially in his/hers. I was distracted in the process of typing my post, so saw neither of yours before posting. – Peter Nov 1 '16 at 9:16
  • @Peter that is your right – bolov Nov 1 '16 at 9:18
  • Bingo. Generally, however, I aim to only downvote incorrect/invalid answers, not answers that happen to include content that is in other answers. However, you used your downvote in such a punitive manner, so I have responded in kind. – Peter Nov 1 '16 at 9:22
  • Thanks for the answer – user7036306 Nov 1 '16 at 9:31
0

Assuming a "meta string" has type foo (a fictitious name I just made up, since you haven't specified what a "meta string" is, you can simply do

template< class A, class B>
struct MapType // default
{
    typedef std::list<Object<A,B>> MyList;
    typedef std::unordered_map<A,B> MyMap;

    MyList mList;
    MyMap mMap;
};


template<class B>
struct MapType<foo, B>
{
     typedef std::list<Object<foo, B>> MyList;
     typedef std::map<foo,B> MyMap;

     MyList mList;
     MyMap mMap;
};
  • sorry, I have to downvote. Your answer is incorporated by TartanLlama answer that was posted before you. Me and him have basically the same answer too, but we posted virtually at the same time. – bolov Nov 1 '16 at 9:10
  • Thanks for the answer – user7036306 Nov 1 '16 at 9:31
0

With partial specialization (to be used in pre-C++11 which might not have std::conditional), you do not need to specialize the entire class (which might be a big burden of copying a lot of methods), but you can specialize just the map type:

template<class A, class B>
class myClass
{
    template<class X, class ITER_T>
    struct map_type {
        typedef std::map<X, ITER_T> type;
    };

    template<class ITER_T>
    struct map_type<std::string, ITER_T> {
        typedef boost::unordered_map<A /* or std::string */, ITER_T> type;
    };

    typedef std::list<Object<A,B>> MyList;
    typedef map_type<A, typename MyList::iterator>::type MyMap;

    MyList mList;
    MyMap mMap;
};

(for pre-C++11 I'd use boost::unordered_map instead of std::unordered_map)

  • Thanks. I will probably use a combination of the methods and perhaps try to avoid the use of conditional thanks to your answer :) – user7036306 Nov 1 '16 at 9:32
  • Sorry, I keep getting declaration of... shadows template parm. the inner template shadows the outer one. How can I fix this? – user7036306 Nov 1 '16 at 9:43
  • 1
    @FPGalero Just change the name of the template parameter for map_type :) – TartanLlama Nov 1 '16 at 9:50
  • @TartanLlama well, that was easy :) thanks – user7036306 Nov 1 '16 at 10:00
  • Yes, I didn't try to compile, updated to use different name for the inner template parameter. Also in the specialization I think A can be used or std::string directly (as in the comment). – axalis Nov 1 '16 at 10:26

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